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When I come across bulging lines in sheetrock, I generally don't mention it in the quote. And when I get the job, I just paint over it. What do you guys do? Do you quote to repair them? If so, would you just cut out the old tape and retape + compound to fix?

Or is it too risky meaning it could just create more problems messing with it? I've done plenty of sheetrock repairs when there are holes but not a line that spans across the whole wall.

I would like to be able to offer fixing these especially to clients with high walls in nice homes who would appreciate getting rid of the eyesore. But wondering what other painters usually do.
 

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Youngling
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When I come across bulging lines in sheetrock, I generally don't mention it in the quote. And when I get the job, I just paint over it. What do you guys do? Do you quote to repair them? If so, would you just cut out the old tape and retape + compound to fix?

Or is it too risky meaning it could just create more problems messing with it? I've done plenty of sheetrock repairs when there are holes but not a line that spans across the whole wall.

I would like to be able to offer fixing these especially to clients with high walls in nice homes who would appreciate getting rid of the eyesore. But wondering what other painters usually do.
Offer the service if you understand drywall repair.

I fix small imperfections when I paint as part of the bid and talk to the homeowner about big repairs and related costs.

My last job I fixed a massive wall buckle.


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You can offer a price to fix it but its not always easy especially if there is light shining on it. You have to understand where to put the mud. Basically you have to find the high spot and graduate it out over a span to make it a more gradual transition. You will need to take it out over a large distance make it look better. Unless you feel confident in your drywall skills I wouldn't offer to fix it. But if you are and can make money on it that upsell it.
 

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That line imo doesn't look fixable without rescrewing the existing drywall or hanging new rock entirely. You have to check it with some sort of straight edge or level, in that case the split looks like two sheets crushing eachother out, and if you put a straight edge on it you'd probably see over 1/8" or probably more like 1/4" of bulge between the two sheets. In that case, no amount of mud over it will make it work, as now the whole wall is out of level.

But with minor seams below an 1/8" or so, you can often feather them out, but then you could be in the game of skim coating the entire wall as you'd probably need to feather them 8-9" wide.

One other place I've seen them split really badly, by say, a couple inches, is transitions between wood stud walls and masonry foundation walls. I've seen sheetrock just nailed in presumably while the concrete was still curing where the nails back out. Using screws there to fix it imo doesn't really work, as you need washers behind your tapcons/etc, you need to use a masonry drill and drill bit, and it sucks. It's probably better to do the UK style "dot and dab" where you get basically cement tile mortar, and put a blob of mortar every foot or so on the board, and press it in until it's level with your other board.

 

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I always repaired any visible tape joints but it more than quadrupled the cost ...our drywall prep typically accounted for more than 75% of the drywall painting cost.

Prior to commencing, I’d do a walk-through with the client and point out all the drywall defects and let them determine how far they’d like to take it.

Sometimes we’d need to either remove the tape, grind down the joints and re-mud (grinding down prevented excessive repair build-up which often results in shadows), or just break them out by troweling out a couple of coats of mud, combined with some screws to pull the drywall in tight if loose. We’d also skim coat nearly every drywall re-paint.

Stairwell flats are more prone to buckling and often re-occur no matter how good the repairs are. On better construction, stairwell walls are often sheathed with plywood prior to drywalling to prevent the flats from compressing & buckling.

111200

111202

111201
 

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I make sure that any "major" repairs are Not included. AKA Drywall seams and retaping. That needs atleast 2 coats of mud and a skim to look proper. I would charge 3 Hrs. labour for that repair. Re-taping not neccasary unless it's soft or cracking. If it is, cut it out and re-tape..
 

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That line imo doesn't look fixable without rescrewing the existing drywall or hanging new rock entirely. You have to check it with some sort of straight edge or level, in that case the split looks like two sheets crushing eachother out, and if you put a straight edge on it you'd probably see over 1/8" or probably more like 1/4" of bulge between the two sheets. In that case, no amount of mud over it will make it work, as now the whole wall is out of level.

But with minor seams below an 1/8" or so, you can often feather them out, but then you could be in the game of skim coating the entire wall as you'd probably need to feather them 8-9" wide.

One other place I've seen them split really badly, by say, a couple inches, is transitions between wood stud walls and masonry foundation walls. I've seen sheetrock just nailed in presumably while the concrete was still curing where the nails back out. Using screws there to fix it imo doesn't really work, as you need washers behind your tapcons/etc, you need to use a masonry drill and drill bit, and it sucks. It's probably better to do the UK style "dot and dab" where you get basically cement tile mortar, and put a blob of mortar every foot or so on the board, and press it in until it's level with your other board.

I’d sometimes have to pull joint compound using a 4’ Darby to make joints disappear when the drywall wasn’t coplanar..the industry standard which is typically included in new construction contract general provisions for drywall finishing flatness is not to exceed 1/8” over a 10’ run.
 

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I’d sometimes have to pull joint compound using a 4’ Darby to make joints disappear when the drywall wasn’t coplanar..the industry standard which is typically included in new construction contract general provisions for drywall finishing flatness is not to exceed 1/8” over a 10’ run.
Tell that to the framers.
 

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I always repaired any visible tape joints but it more than quadrupled the cost ...our drywall prep typically accounted for more than 75% of the drywall painting cost.

Prior to commencing, I’d do a walk-through with the client and point out all the drywall defects and let them determine how far they’d like to take it.

Sometimes we’d need to either remove the tape, grind down the joints and re-mud (grinding down prevented excessive repair build-up which often results in shadows), or just break them out by troweling out a couple of coats of mud, combined with some screws to pull the drywall in tight if loose. We’d also skim coat nearly every drywall re-paint.

Stairwell flats are more prone to buckling and often re-occur no matter how good the repairs are. On better construction, stairwell walls are often sheathed with plywood prior to drywalling to prevent the flats from compressing & buckling.

View attachment 111200
View attachment 111202
View attachment 111201
Thats the nicest dropped out set of stairs I've ever seen. Lol. Where did you get those sheets? They fit like a glove. Dropping stairs has always been a battle. Especially on a curved stairwell..
 

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Would you mind explaining the "Trimaco on the miter saw" comment... ?
Can't picture how you were using that.
Gonna Guess he stuck the roll on the Miter saw and cut off a few inches from the end. Now the Roll is the Exact size of the stairs when he rolls it out.

Done this with Paper rolls (Rosin, Masking) To resize them to an exact width.

Example:
 

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Gonna Guess he stuck the roll on the Miter saw and cut off a few inches from the end. Now the Roll is the Exact size of the stairs when he rolls it out.

Done this with Paper rolls (Rosin, Masking) To resize them to an exact width.

Example:
nice.
 
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