Professional Painting Contractors Forum banner

21 - 40 of 63 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,373 Posts
Good point Criard. BM's extender is made from the same (in house) materials as their paint, which does help a lot with compatibility as long as you're using it with their products. I'm not sure how well Floetrol meshes with most brands; I stock both, some people seem to prefer Floetrol (maybe just name association).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Yes you can over thin wb paint, it says right on the label apply right from the can,if needed apply a SMALL amount of water. If you thin paint out to to much it's pretty much worthless since it can't do what it was designed to do
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
I notice that some batches of duration and aura exterior are thicker than others, so i have been flinging a bit of water in the paint pot, alittle helps alot. Otherwise its way slow brushing with heavy paint and i lose accuracy with windows and doors. In hot weather the paint thickens up even more in the pot. With rolling, i just work the paint as much as i can, without thinning. Without knowing any science of paint, i would think the viscosity has something to do with its durability.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,174 Posts
Paint these days are designed to be applied right out of the can, actually the coating falls apart when you over thin the paint. Some enamels lose their hang time with any amount of water. Most lables will tell you "sparingly" which tells me not to thin it unless absolutely necessary, and if needed it being less than 1%. Your comprising the coating when deviating from manufacturer recommendation. You lose all manufacturer support, widening the liability for potential failures. Doesn't take much for a coating to fail, over thinning is just promoting failure.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,373 Posts
Paint these days are designed to be applied right out of the can, actually the coating falls apart when you over thin the paint. Some enamels lose their hang time with any amount of water. Most lables will tell you "sparingly" which tells me not to thin it unless absolutely necessary, and if needed it being less than 1%. Your comprising the coating when deviating from manufacturer recommendation. You lose all manufacturer support, widening the liability for potential failures. Doesn't take much for a coating to fail, over thinning is just promoting failure.
To add to that, many TDS will have a maximum thinning amount for your application. I know modern BM paints do. And to tie into another thread nicely, as you mention, a company is going to ask how much you thinned their coating as a part of their normal questions if you have a product failure. When you say 30% they're going to laugh and walk away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,338 Posts
I find that if I put too much water in my scotch I don't get drunk fast enough.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CApainter

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,338 Posts
You people are so strange. Why are you putting other stuff in perfectly good liquor?
Because it's the correct way to drink scotch. a little spring water opens the bouquet. Look it up.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DrakeB

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,338 Posts
That's what the ice is for.
You can't control the flavor of ice. That's why in Scotland it's traditional to actually have a spring water tap at the bar. Ideally, you would use the same spring water source the distillery used to make the scotch.

Like my moonshining ancestors. They used Ohio river water in their moonshine.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,373 Posts
You can't control the flavor of ice. That's why in Scotland it's traditional to actually have a spring water tap at the bar. Ideally, you would use the same spring water source the distillery used to make the scotch.

Like my moonshining ancestors. They used Ohio river water in their moonshine.
Couldn't you just put spring water in ice trays?

Mods, I'd like to ask that this thread title be changed to "Can you thin your liquor too little" please.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
I agree one can thin to much but I always thought the addatives like penetro did not hurt the paint like a solvent as a thinner. I would be willing to bet even if I did 50/50 penetrol and oil paint it would bound good and not fail. It would not cover but it would not fail. Penetrol can be used as primer by itself I know on bare metal.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
10,539 Posts
I agree one can thin to much but I always thought the addatives like penetro did not hurt the paint like a solvent as a thinner. I would be willing to bet even if I did 50/50 penetrol and oil paint it would bound good and not fail. It would not cover but it would not fail. Penetrol can be used as primer by itself I know on bare metal.
We haven't used Penetrol for years, but the label used to talk about adding oil colors or oil paint to make penetrating stains. We used to take that route to make custom deck stains, adding cadmium red, for instance. We've also used it straight as a paintable water repellant on window sills and thresholds.

EDIT: the Australian website for Flood still lists all of those uses, the U.S. TDS, not so much.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TJ Paint

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
I use penetrol all the time. We brush lots of trim around hear. People do not like the sprayed look they think it looks mass produced and cheap. Thinning with penetrol get a nice look. It almost looks sprayed.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
10,539 Posts
I use penetrol all the time. We brush lots of trim around hear. People do not like the sprayed look they think it looks mass produced and cheap. Thinning with penetrol get a nice look. It almost looks sprayed.
How do you deal with the yellowing?

A recently departed PC around here did a passel of kitchens, mostly white, and he used Penetrol liberally to help the leveling. His kitchens didn't turn yellow, they turned orange! They were startling to see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
We probably only use 5% Penetrol at most. We warm the paint to help with leveling as well. Nobody seems to use pure white on trim and cabinets around here. Its almost always an off white that is borderline cream. We just did one westhighland white a sherwin williams color look it up if you get a chance that is a typical trim color around here. I think since it is already yellow the yellowing is not a noticable. It had 4/32 of deep yellow in a gallon.
 

·
PinheadsUnite
Joined
·
30,724 Posts
How do you deal with the yellowing?

A recently departed PC around here did a passel of kitchens, mostly white, and he used Penetrol liberally to help the leveling. His kitchens didn't turn yellow, they turned orange! They were startling to see.
How much did he use?

I've used boiled linseed to help leveling and never had a discoloration. Sure with enough of any amber "extender" one could notice a change, but would have to be a diaper full, one would think.

(Penetrol, IMO, has too many driers in it)
 

·
PinheadsUnite
Joined
·
30,724 Posts
I take it most people do not use oil anymore than. I know I need to get with the modern times but I still love the oil paint.
I'm as stubborn and old school as you. Going so far as to "reconstitute" castrated oils so they look and act like the oils of our youth.

One of the (many) reasons I stopped the paint and went exclusively to wallpaper installation, was the degradation of oils and the inferiority of latex (there was no term "waterbornes") in 1990.

BUT since then the waterbornes have far evolved (generally speaking) into superior coatings than the castrated oils.

This spring as I have been catching up on house maint, I been trying to use up some old oils and some other left over waterbornes, and what I LOVE about using waterbornes is the lack of solvent fumes & odor. The quality of life after painting a room is far healthier than the old days when the whole house would be permeated with fumes of thinners and drying alkyds for up to three days after.

I bet the life expectancy of painters has been increased by a decade for those that don't use oils.
 
21 - 40 of 63 Posts
Top