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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can you use Rustoleum Painters Touch Ultra cover premium latex paint with leather?

I've used this to paint leather edges and goes on fine just like "leather edge paint" that is sold in the industry for this purpose. The paints look very similar and i wanted to know if they are the same. Anyone know?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm not talking about dying leather. I do that and I know the difference.

I have used a latex based "edge paint" for years and it goes on thick and rubbery. It is used on high end leather hand bags. I get the paint from Italy. in the industry it is just called "leather edge paint."

https://www.buckleguy.com/leather-edge-paint/

it is about 4x the cost of the Rustoleum latex

My question is for someone that might have insight in the chemical composition of the "Rustoleum Painters Touch Ultra cover premium latex paint" is it the same?

Has anyone used the Rusoleum latex paint for leather? and how is the long term on it?
 

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I'm not talking about dying leather. I do that and I know the difference.

I have used a latex based "edge paint" for years and it goes on thick and rubbery. It is used on high end leather hand bags. I get the paint from Italy. in the industry it is just called "leather edge paint."

https://www.buckleguy.com/leather-edge-paint/

it is about 4x the cost of the Rustoleum latex

My question is for someone that might have insight in the chemical composition of the "Rustoleum Painters Touch Ultra cover premium latex paint" is it the same?

Has anyone used the Rusoleum latex paint for leather? and how is the long term on it?
Take it easy. You're requesting a lot of technical information from members of this site who've rarely, if ever, used leather edging paint.

BuckleGuy didn't present an easy access to their TDS (Technical Data Sheet) or SDS (Safety Data Sheet) where ingredients could be found in some cases.

Giardini at least provided some info on their lowered VOC waterborne leather edging paint that states it is comprised of an Acrylic emulsion with the addition of nanotechnology in the way of scuff resistant particulates.

Even though architectural paints in general are made of Acrylic resins, they may not apply to your needs. Since you know the leather painting industry better than any of us, I'd suggest you search more info from the leather product manufacturers.

It would be too easy to say "Sure, go ahead and use house paint on that expensive purse". But I'm certain no one wants to be liable for that. Good luck.
 

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Leather edging paint is probably quite a bit more flexible than the Rustoleum acrylic ultra touch. Leather edging paint is probably more like a paint made for cloth and such. A more flexible acrylic.
 

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Even though the "Rustoleum Painters Touch Ultra cover premium latex paint" is formulated with an acrylic resin, according to the TDS, it doesn't mention anything about leather.
 

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Leather edging paint is probably quite a bit more flexible than the Rustoleum acrylic ultra touch. Leather edging paint is probably more like a paint made for cloth and such. A more flexible acrylic.
The Giardini leather edging paint has nanotechnology. Maybe that's the difference between a BEHR Premium and leather edging paint.

We've provided quite a bit of information. Unfortunately, our site chemist hasn't entered the conversation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I've done tests with the Rustoleum latex paint and Italian edge paint and they both appear to be the same. They apply the same, smell the same and are flexable. The rustoleum on the leather edge (on left in the pic) is just as durable, i twisted and turned it and it stayed on. I just don't know about the long term

only 1 minor difference with the black rustoleum in the can wet it is lighter then when dried on the leather. With the Italian edge paint wet or dry it is the same color.

I have a feeling that "nanotechnology" is BS and a way for Giardini to jack up the price of Rustoluem paint

 

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Painting is full of subjectivity until it comes down to warranties and liabilities. It doesn't surprise me that the architectural acrylic resin based paint performs similarly to the leather edging acrylic paint. That's the trouble with paint, it seems to look and perform perfectly at immediate glance. But it's the performance over a period of time that separates makeshift applications from designed applications. Kind of like the PVA Sealer debates we have here.

Your job looks fantastic! I hope it holds up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
very true on paint subjectivity. let me ask from another angle.

What binds the rustoleum paint to wood or metal and not to metal? It is flexable at least in the short term and binds in the short term.

leather has oils and waxes could that break the bind? but wood is a material that has pores and takes in the environment and even patinas like leather

they also sell a base edge paint i assume helps the binding to the leather
 

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Okay, look at it this way... Your leather paint is 4X the price of the rustoleum....

Okay, how much are you even using of this paint? How much would you even save in a month if you did switch over?

Us painters deal with hundreds of gallons, and we know that spending more on a higher quality paint may cost us thousands of dollars, but we know it wont fail, and we wont get the callbacks, etc. etc. The chemical composition could be VERY similar, but the rustoleum is designed to go on hard, nonflexible surfaces. There may be an additive for this that would be detrimental on a flexible surface.

Now, how much would you be at a loss of your purses came back cuz the paint failed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
it is not all about the money even though i do commercial manufacturing and it would save.

i want to understand this paint

also, using rustoluem gives me more flexibility of colors and it's local availability .

btw, bags have come back from peeling edge paint on the "leather edge paint" manufacturer told me it is probably because i did not rough up the surface good enough or use a base.
 

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I would get some rustoleum, paint the half the inside of a belt with it, the other half with the leather paint, wear it (or have someone wear it) for a couple months and see what happens.
 

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You might want to look into GARDZ. (inside joke) But seriously, a primer/sealer might be useful in your situation.

There is a difference between a chemical bond and mechanical bond. Most paints are mechanically bonded to a substrate either through permeation or grip. That's why it is so important to scuff, sand, or even abrasive blast an anchor profile in steel. The paint will offer some flexibility to allow it to remain adhered to the substrate during normal movement.

But unlike a steel tank, or building, a purse is going to be subjected to a lot twisting movements that will go beyond the limits of what most paints are designed for.

For example, I can place an infant on the saddle of a bucking bull and have him grip the rope. That baby's limited grip will only allow him to remain long enough before the bull begins to buck. Now put a professional bull rider on that same saddle and he will remain through some fierce bucking.

Another thing to consider, is the sweat and oils a handbag will be subjected to. Many single component paints will break down and soften up to the point of being sticky if constant contact with oil or chemicals occur.
 

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I've done tests with the Rustoleum latex paint and Italian edge paint and they both appear to be the same. They apply the same, smell the same and are flexable. The rustoleum on the leather edge (on left in the pic) is just as durable, i twisted and turned it and it stayed on. I just don't know about the long term

only 1 minor difference with the black rustoleum in the can wet it is lighter then when dried on the leather. With the Italian edge paint wet or dry it is the same color.

I have a feeling that "nanotechnology" is BS and a way for Giardini to jack up the price of Rustoluem paint

Nanotechnology is a thing, but i'm not quite sure Rustoleum actually has it though. They may claim they have it, because all it really refers to is the "size" of the "technology" and who really rates and legislates that? No one. Just like the paints that claim they are mold resistant because they have nano-quantities of mold killer!
 

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very true on paint subjectivity. let me ask from another angle.

What binds the rustoleum paint to wood or metal and not to metal? It is flexable at least in the short term and binds in the short term.

leather has oils and waxes could that break the bind? but wood is a material that has pores and takes in the environment and even patinas like leather

they also sell a base edge paint i assume helps the binding to the leather
I don't think it would be a problem using the cheaper paint on the edge cut of leather. That is a pretty open grained substrate and any good acrylic should adhere to it quite well. I don't think i would use a regular house paint type acrylic on the surface face of leather just because it may be to brittle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
yes that "nanotechnology" has always got me because it means nothing unless you give more details

what do you think about heating the latex acrylic paint? Does it harm or help?

We apply multiple layers and at times and sometimes heat the rough parts with an iron to melt so you can apply a smooth coat.

pacman do you think the oils and waxes in the leather fibers would affect the paint? how about the patina / oxidization that forms on leather?
 

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yes that "nanotechnology" has always got me because it means nothing unless you give more details

what do you think about heating the latex acrylic paint? Does it harm or help?

We apply multiple layers and at times and sometimes heat the rough parts with an iron to melt so you can apply a smooth coat.

pacman do you think the oils and waxes in the leather fibers would affect the paint? how about the patina / oxidization that forms on leather?
Oils, waxes, and oxidation are considered to be contaminants on any substrate to be painted.

This will be my last contribution to this thread because we're circle talking. Bottom line, using any material outside of its recommended use, whether successful or not, is simply Hillbilly science.
 

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Oils, waxes, and oxidation are considered to be contaminants on any substrate to be painted.

This will be my last contribution to this thread because we're circle talking. Bottom line, using any material outside of its recommended use, whether successful or not, is simply Hillbilly science.
And what's wrong with that? You do remember Jed Clampett don't you?
 
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