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Good to know. Maybe I try lacquer on the next one. Let you know how it goes! 馃槀

If you can find any, clear waterborne undercoater/sanding sealer is also a good thing to use under waterborne finishes. They dry quickly and sand to a powder. Lenmar, General Finishes, Gemeni and plenty of other manufacturers make one.


Good quality lacquers like the lenmar stuff are so easy to use, it just lays down for you with an hvlp no thinning required and recoat is way faster. Used with the lenmar quick stains for example you can stain, sanding sealer and 2-3 top coats in a day. Old masters stain + waterborne poly are a 2-3 day process.
 

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update. Old Masters Stain worked really well. The OM Poly was good too except a little tricky sprayed out of the hvlp. Put on 3 coats, sanding between coats. Problem I believe is all the dry spray coming from the hvlp and all the angle on a chair.
Seemed like an uphill battle not to get dry spray on other areas of the chair while trying to spray all angles. Wondering if brushing on the final coat would be an idea..It looked good, but felt a little rough..
 

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update. Old Masters Stain worked really well. The OM Poly was good too except a little tricky sprayed out of the hvlp. Put on 3 coats, sanding between coats. Problem I believe is all the dry spray coming from the hvlp and all the angle on a chair.
Seemed like an uphill battle not to get dry spray on other areas of the chair while trying to spray all angles. Wondering if brushing on the final coat would be an idea..It looked good, but felt a little rough..
I always do "Wipe On" Poly for furniture, it is really easy to manage.
 

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Do I have to use actual "wiping Poly" for that, or could I just thin down my old masters and wipe it on. Not sure if I should switch products this late in the game..

I always do "Wipe On" Poly for furniture, it is really easy to manage.
 

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Do I have to use actual "wiping Poly" for that, or could I just thin down my old masters and wipe it on. Not sure if I should switch products this late in the game..
I have heard that wipe on is just thin poly and any one of them can be thinned down for a wipe on application. I would thin it incrementally and try it on a scrap until it seems the right level of viscosity.
 

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Heres a couple of the finished product. Turned out looking really nice and very close to the original. Just a little rough from the dry spray. Going to try maybe wiping on all or just final coat of clear on next ones.
 

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They look nice! I also wipe vs spray most of the time. Haven't tried Old Masters but Arm R Seal by General Finishes is an excellent wipe on poly. I have used Minwax wipe on poly and it is OK too. My favorite for old stuff is Waterlox its wipe, brush, spray. Instead of a urethane resin it has a phenolic resin. Doesnt yellow and is easier to repair. I would call it an "old school" finish. Very forgiving. I agree with wiping final coat after a light sand may get rid of the foggy look. That foggy look my be the flattener if you are using satin. I have used HVLP but you really have to turn it down. You can virtually eliminate overspray if you really turn air a material down and move in close.
 

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And yes, for reference about 11-12 hrs labour in total on the first chair. Not including all the messing around finding materials. Maybe a bit quicker on next ones. .
 

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They look nice! I also wipe vs spray most of the time. Haven't tried Old Masters but Arm R Seal by General Finishes is an excellent wipe on poly. I have used Minwax wipe on poly and it is OK too. My favorite for old stuff is Waterlox its wipe, brush, spray. Instead of a urethane resin it has a phenolic resin. Doesnt yellow and is easier to repair. I would call it an "old school" finish. Very forgiving. I agree with wiping final coat after a light sand may get rid of the foggy look. That foggy look my be the flattener if you are using satin. I have used HVLP but you really have to turn it down. You can virtually eliminate overspray if you really turn air a material down and move in close.
Arm-r-seal makes a great Urethane.
I use it as a wiping varnish...often, to touch-up around windows when the Lacquer fails. Urethane is pretty safe if you don't know what clear is underneath, and looks good with minimal effort.
 

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They look nice! I also wipe vs spray most of the time. Haven't tried Old Masters but Arm R Seal by General Finishes is an excellent wipe on poly. I have used Minwax wipe on poly and it is OK too. My favorite for old stuff is Waterlox its wipe, brush, spray. Instead of a urethane resin it has a phenolic resin. Doesnt yellow and is easier to repair. I would call it an "old school" finish. Very forgiving. I agree with wiping final coat after a light sand may get rid of the foggy look. That foggy look my be the flattener if you are using satin. I have used HVLP but you really have to turn it down. You can virtually eliminate overspray if you really turn air a material down and move in close.
That's like Dalys teak oil. Has phenolic resin, Tung and oil modified urethane. We usually 'wet sand' old finishes with benite then a couple coats of Dalys teak oil.

Odies oil is also good easy to use finish.
 

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@finishesbykevyn I am afraid I have a few $50 peices with $1000 finishes. The other ones will go much faster. If you continue with HVLP no reason you couldn't hit them all saving a lot of cleaning. Wet sanding poly can really give you a nice finish but you have to apply enough finish to fill the grain.
 

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What's the benefit of wet sanding vs. dry sanding and what grit/type of paper are you using? Is this before the final coat?

@finishesbykevyn I am afraid I have a few $50 peices with $1000 finishes. The other ones will go much faster. If you continue with HVLP no reason you couldn't hit them all saving a lot of cleaning. Wet sanding poly can really give you a nice finish but you have to apply enough finish to fill the grain.
 

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Post some pics when you're done.

I prefer slow drying stains (like minwax and OM) for "nicer" woods. I think it enhances the grain a little more than the fast drying stains, and less likely to get blotchy.
I stain prior to top coat with a deep penetrating stain and wipe off. I do not apply the finish coat for 2-3 days after that. I also do french polish, rubbed lacquer & rubbed urethane but as a rule, wipe on poly is a nice finish that won't cost the earth on labor, is reliable and clients find the price is right.

These are the last 2 items I did. The table was an ancient, gray, warped, water damaged wreck! Both being antiques I do no remove all evidence of age.

View attachment 104961

View attachment 104963
OAK KRUG DESK CHAIR 1935


View attachment 104965
MISSION STYLE TABLE / NOT REPRO Date unknown
 

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I stain prior to top coat with a deep penetrating stain and wipe off. I do not apply the finish coat for 2-3 days after that. I also do french polish, rubbed lacquer & rubbed urethane but as a rule, wipe on poly is a nice finish that won't cost the earth on labor, is reliable and clients find the price is right.

These are the last 2 items I did. The table was an ancient, gray, warped, water damaged wreck! Both being antiques I do no remove all evidence of age.

View attachment 104961

View attachment 104963
OAK KRUG DESK CHAIR 1935


View attachment 104965
MISSION STYLE TABLE / NOT REPRO Date unknown
Great looking work, Jennifer!
 

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Thank You, @Brushman4 I wish I had a before pic of that table, I got it for $5 because it looked beyond redemption. I have a before of the chair but it was not nearly so decrepit. I like to take what looks nonredeemable and surprise people. It generally only costs my labour and material to revive what might look like junk.
 

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I stain prior to top coat with a deep penetrating stain and wipe off. I do not apply the finish coat for 2-3 days after that. I also do french polish, rubbed lacquer & rubbed urethane but as a rule, wipe on poly is a nice finish that won't cost the earth on labor, is reliable and clients find the price is right.

These are the last 2 items I did. The table was an ancient, gray, warped, water damaged wreck! Both being antiques I do no remove all evidence of age.

View attachment 104961

View attachment 104963
OAK KRUG DESK CHAIR 1935


View attachment 104965
MISSION STYLE TABLE / NOT REPRO Date unknown
Nice work!

I love the figure/rays on the mission table. Have you ever played around with fuming? Have done a bit of it. It really pops the rays beautifully. Also have done a bunch of mission/arts & crafts pieces achieving period color utilizing potassium dichromate aka bichromate of potash in conjunction with copperas.. the formulation being a Greene & Greene signature utilized during the arts & crafts movement, PD being dangerous stuff. Wiping finishes are the way to go with mission style..I love the minimalist look and silky feel of wiping finishes..
 

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@finishesbykevyn I do wet sanding by hand with progressively higher grits. You can wet or dry sand sand between coats. After you have enough finish on you wet sand. Water is a lubricant , keeps your sandpaper clean, provides a smoother sand, and holds dust down. You will get a slurry of water and finish that you can wipe up. Start with 400 and move up to 600, 800, 1000 depending on final sheen you want. I use Mequires #2 (automotive finish product) to remove fine marks in finish. Can buff it out gloss or leave it satin. When wet sanding flat surfaces I use a sanding block. It will cut fast so you have to be careful and not sand through finish. There are some old school abrasives such as rottenstone but I have not tried them. I haven't tried with poly but with waterlox you can wet sand with the finish making a slurry of wood and finish. This will work into the pores and act as a filler. Useful on walnut, mahogany, oak, any wood with large pores. I don't think it would work well with poly.
 

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@Tprice2193 Just an FYI: Pumice and rottenstone are mainly used for the final polishing stages of a rubbed finish. Rottenstone is used with something like mineral oil to rub up the gloss, once all the oil has been washed off you can also do a waxed finishing polish. I have done a lot of that kind of thing. It is an expensive finish because it is very labor intensive. The average HO would not be willing to pay that kind of labor. (it is absolutely the nicest of finishes, though!) I doubt @finishesbykevyn could invest the kind of time required to do all the levels of wet sanding and stone rubbing you are suggesting. Great care must be taken, but yes, the process will work on poly JUST DON'T BREAK THROUGH ANY OF THE POLY LAYERS AT ANY POINT IN THE SANDING PROCESSES!!! or you will need to remove it all and start over.
 
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