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I was also told, that its not exactly a catalyst, as in, after the 48 hour pot life, the product is still perfectly usable, but the crosslinker is no longer active after that time, but you can simply add more, so thats pretty cool.

Old masters hardener is not listed what the mechanism for cross linking is but TBH it sounds similar to aziridine cross linkers like Dalys and more than likely that is what it is. 48 hours life, then add more if need. aziridine based crosslinkers are unique in that they can be added to pretty much any acrylic finish.


Dalys crosslinker is 73% propylene glycol / 27% aziridine.
Lenmar crosslinker is 100% aziridine.


Interestingly the Daly's crosslinker would probably work nicely as both a crosslinker AND a latex extender like XIM due to the high amount of propylene glycol.



https://www.dalyswoodfinishes.com/PDF/specs/S-CrystalFinFloors.pdf
http://www.dalyswoodfinishes.com/PDF/sds/SDS-CROSSLINKER.pdf
 

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wow.
hard to believe that 4 coats of oil-based polyurethane would fail in less than 2 years! I'm curious what a failure would look like.

That was my feeling as well. I've had it on my main dining table for 4 years now. It's taken quite a beating and is still sound! I do wander if there was not some kind of contamination on the surface prior to application. I love the wipe on for a quick finish! I usually go 3-4 applications with a light wet sand between coats.
 

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About 18 years ago a local Starbucks restaurant asked me to refinish their almost new table tops as the finish had grown soft in less than one year.

I did so using Minwax Oil based semi-gloss which I brushed on. Four heavy coats and 10 days cure before returning the tops.

Starbucks remodels their stores every 10 years. When the refinished tables were retired they still looked very good with only minor surface scratches (probably from the old ceramic dishes--which were also retired for plastic ones).

I'm not saying it is the best finish for a table; but it is one that I know will stand up to commercial use for 9½ years of daily spills and wipings.

I think key is letting it have a full cure (7+ days) before putting the tops back in service regardless of the chosen finish.
 

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Timberlox Waterborne Polycarbonate Urathane Varnish from Cloverdale. Comes in satin & gloss. I've used this stuff on my own table, hardwood stair treads and nosings, wood doors, etc etc. Its my go to clear. Sand nice, spray brush or roll or pad all good. Best of all like you its Canadian :)
Am I allowed to link products in these forums?
Cheers
 

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Because of its longevity, I usually use polyurethane for table and desk tops. Tung oil is more difficult to deal with and isn't as long-lasting.

Layers of satin or other less glossy finishes build up softer than gloss, even if you don't desire a shining finish. I use gloss finish to build the desired finish, sanding as needed, and then buff the final finish to the desired level of shine. If you want to save time, start with a gloss finish and then finish with a satin or matte finish.

Take your time and allow each coat to fully cure. A soft layer deep down will always be soft, preventing the next layer from fully bonding.

Because modern coatings are chemically inert once they've been cured, you can choose between water-based and alkyd finishes based on your tolerance for the processes themselves. Cleaning with water vs. cleaning with solvents If drying in a too hot room, there will be fumes, bubbles in the finish, and orange peel.

If you didn't fill the grain before staining, an application of sanding sealer will help you finish the top with a good, smooth finish.
 
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