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Hi everybody.

I'm a long time lurker and first time poster. I've run into a problem I have never seen before and I was wondering if someone knows how to proceed with the next steps.

It was a simple unpainted popcorn removal project. Easy enough. I assumed it was drywall underneath the popcorn in this two story townhouse. Nope it's concrete, I should have tapped it to figure that out. There is some kind of sandy grout between the popcorn and the concrete however and its not easy to remove. I tried smoothing it out by sanding it with 150 grit paper but its making scratches as if im using 60 grit. I vacuumed off as much dust as I could and im thinking of testing skim coating directly over it and in another spot priming it and then skim coating. Does anyone know which option would be better and what primer would be best for this unusual surface ? Its still very sandy and rubs of dust if you touch it.

Any advice would be appreciated!


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111856
 

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Its concrete covered with a thin layer of a grainy substance that's almost like grout.
 

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I get the impression the pics show what remains after the popcorn was removed, but maybe not. Either way, if what is there is sound, vac well, apply a quality primer of your choice, then skim coat. Overall it seems like a fairly straightforward project - at least from where I am sitting on my couch.
 

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I get the impression the pics show what remains after the popcorn was removed, but maybe not. Either way, if what is there is sound, vac well, apply a quality primer of your choice, then skim coat. Overall it seems like a fairly straightforward project - at least from where I am sitting on my couch.
Thats correct. I already removed the popcorn texture.

Today I decided to skim coat it before priming it. Hopefully its going to bond well enough. I had a gut feeling no primer is going to bond to that sandy/chalky surface.
 

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Yeah, I debated about the real need for a primer coat prior to skim coating, but when making suggestions, I prefer to be overly cautious than not.
 
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I hope I don't regret not priming it first. Everything went well with skimming first. I decided on using Gardz as the first coat because it states it is good for chalky problem walls. Two coats of yellow can ceiling paint on top and it looks mint.

Time will tell now if that was the right play.

Does no one here have any experience with popcorn ceilings over concrete ? There is surprisingly little to no info about this on the interwebs. I could only find one video of it on youtube
 

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I hope I don't regret not priming it first. Everything went well with skimming first. I decided on using Gardz as the first coat because it states it is good for chalky problem walls. Two coats of yellow can ceiling paint on top and it looks mint.

Time will tell now if that was the right play.

Does no one here have any experience with popcorn ceilings over concrete ? There is surprisingly little to no info about this on the interwebs. I could only find one video of it on youtube
You can skim over Gardz- that should be fine. I've done that in the past a few times without any problems.
 

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I hope I don't regret not priming it first. Everything went well with skimming first. I decided on using Gardz as the first coat because it states it is good for chalky problem walls. Two coats of yellow can ceiling paint on top and it looks mint.

Time will tell now if that was the right play.

Does no one here have any experience with popcorn ceilings over concrete ? There is surprisingly little to no info about this on the interwebs. I could only find one video of it on youtube
There can obviously be a lot of geographic and time variations with regards to building practices. And I have no comprehensive knowledge of it. But I'm going to guess it's just exceedingly rare either way. Popcorn, to me goes with residential applications where concrete ceilings are exceedingly rare. I've never even seen one - unless one means plaster and lath. And concrete goes with commercial building where popcorn is less likely to be found. See my first 2 sentences, but I think you just came across a really rare bird.
 

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I hope I don't regret not priming it first. Everything went well with skimming first. I decided on using Gardz as the first coat because it states it is good for chalky problem walls. Two coats of yellow can ceiling paint on top and it looks mint.

Time will tell now if that was the right play.

Does no one here have any experience with popcorn ceilings over concrete ? There is surprisingly little to no info about this on the interwebs. I could only find one video of it on youtube
If the surface of the bare concrete was not too chalky, you should get away with skimming over it without a primer. I've just experienced too many patching failures due to chalky surfaces, that I choose to primer prior tp patching over suspect surfaces. GARDZ will definitly penetrate and possibly add to better adhesion of the joint compound.

As far as the mint color, there might be something wrong with the paint if it was supposed to be yellow.
 

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Hi everybody.

I'm a long time lurker and first time poster. I've run into a problem I have never seen before and I was wondering if someone knows how to proceed with the next steps.

It was a simple unpainted popcorn removal project. Easy enough. I assumed it was drywall underneath the popcorn in this two story townhouse. Nope it's concrete, I should have tapped it to figure that out. There is some kind of sandy grout between the popcorn and the concrete however and its not easy to remove. I tried smoothing it out by sanding it with 150 grit paper but its making scratches as if im using 60 grit. I vacuumed off as much dust as I could and im thinking of testing skim coating directly over it and in another spot priming it and then skim coating. Does anyone know which option would be better and what primer would be best for this unusual surface ? Its still very sandy and rubs of dust if you touch it.

Any advice would be appreciated!


View attachment 111855 View attachment 111856
I would shoot an oil primer on it skim coat it and go from there
 

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This. Quikrete Concrete Bonding agent is PVA glue, paint it on, then skim coat. It will help glue stuff to the concrete/sand, and better guarantees your skim coat sticks, especially if you have a thick layer. It's basically a plaster trick, to use a bonding agent. Plaster Weld is another one, but Quikrete bonding agent works just as well and is commonly available at Home Depot. The consistency is pretty much like a thinner more brushable Elmer's Glue.

I would actually not use a paint primer under it as if that doesn't stick it's going to be giant sheets of stuff as latex, and oil could still have issues. It's better to just use bonding agent as glue to stabilize the surface. It also works I'm presuming similar to Gardz in drywall repairs where the paper is torn, it doesn't dry up as hard as I've heard Gardz does, but it still will seal the surface and allow the joint compound to bond.
 
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