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Obviously this thread shows just how PERSONAL a paint brush is! I know for 40 years I've been on the lookout for the perfect brush for me (interior use) and, quite by accident, I discovered the Wooster Pro's at HD. Not a lot of painters use them, not a lot of positive feedback either, but, for me, they are perfect. Not too firm, not too soft. I love the amount of paint it holds and my cut-ins go fast!!! I mean, I hate those brushes that are soft and floppy and you spend twice as much time cutting in as you do rolling the walls.

Im not saying a Wooster Pro is right for everyone, but, if you catch them on sale at HD as you're strolling through, give them a look-see. At $12 a pop, you can buy 2 or 3 in comparison to the elite brushes like Corona.
Are these the ones you are talking about?


That's the one I was going to try until I realized the store right across the street from my Home Depot carries Coronas. Looks like the 2.5" Cortez is $19.99 so not bad. Hard to find much info on Corona models though as far as stiffness goes.
 

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...That's the one I was going to try until I realized the store right across the street from my Home Depot carries Coronas. Looks like the 2.5" Cortez is $19.99 so not bad. Hard to find much info on Corona models though as far as stiffness goes.
Look at what the bristles are made out of. That won't change from brush to brush.
 

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Obviously this thread shows just how PERSONAL a paint brush is! I know for 40 years I've been on the lookout for the perfect brush for me (interior use) and, quite by accident, I discovered the Wooster Pro's at HD. Not a lot of painters use them, not a lot of positive feedback either, but, for me, they are perfect. Not too firm, not too soft. I love the amount of paint it holds and my cut-ins go fast!!! I mean, I hate those brushes that are soft and floppy and you spend twice as much time cutting in as you do rolling the walls.

Im not saying a Wooster Pro is right for everyone, but, if you catch them on sale at HD as you're strolling through, give them a look-see. At $12 a pop, you can buy 2 or 3 in comparison to the elite brushes like Corona.
I recently discovered these while painting some block walls. The brush I was using before took 6 strokes to fill the holes in the block. The Wooster took 2.
 

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The stiffest brushes I've found are the pink filament ones. I usually buy SW Provals for those.

I almost want to do a review here, but oddly Harbor Freight has amazing brushes for $5. They have the orange bristles that newer HD store brand/Linzer? brushes have, and another that seems to have almost the same bristles as Linzer, for $5.50 or so.

This brush here.

It's the same bristles and everything as these brushes from HD:

Would anyone be interested in a Harbor Freight paint brush review? For $5 they're awesome. I still prefer my Wooster Silver Tips, but these are better in some scenarios (stiffer.)

These are sort of like a slightly stiffer Purdy in how they handle, less stiff than the orange ones (little less accurate for me.)
 

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To double post some, what I've found with brushes is besides the surface you're painting over, and conditions, generally I find:

Softer brush:
Less brush marks in theory. Works better with thinner and slower drying paints, something like BM Advance or similar. Works worse with thicker and faster drying paints like Aura or Regal. Coverage can be better as it forces you to go slower, leaving more mils of paint on the surface and less separation between each brush mark.

Stiffer brush:
More brush marks in theory. Works better with thicker and faster drying paints, like Aura or Regal. With thicker and faster drying paints it can be easier to leave a consistent mil layer and not have it dry while applying it, and the stiffer bristles have more ability to pull into semi-dry paint and leave it OK looking. Usually easier to leave more accurate cut lines with a stiffer brush, but that could be technique. Stiffer brush=brush works more like a pen and doesn't respond as much to your hand making wrong micro-movements.

I noticed some stiffer paint brushes say "For today's low VOC paints!" on them or something to that effect, I believe I saw Shurlines with the pink bristles labeled that at Lowes a long time ago. I think it's true, but those brushes can be worse for a thinner paint, but some of the fast dry low VOC paints are about impossible to apply with a soft brush like a Purdy XL now (imo.) So a stiffer brush can probably do more of everything better than a soft brush now. Same with exterior, stiffer is better, especially in hot weather or with a faster drying exterior paint. Also for anything textured, stiffer is a requirement, as texture creates brush drag.

At least this is how I believe paint brushes "work" and the general rules. Obviously everyone's experience will be different but I try to change brushes for each type of paint I use, and the only happy medium brush I've found is the Wooster Silver Tip, but even then I'll switch to something stiffer if the situation requires it, if I have stiffer brushes on hand or can go to work next day with one.

Some stuff is technique, too. The guy I work for generally uses softer brushes, but has a tendency to not work his paint as much, I tend to definitely have a tendency to overwork any paint, he tends to be able to just put it on and get it just right (I would rate him as better at brushing trim than me to be totally honest) whereas I tend to backbrush more, and with some modern paints that technique no longer really works the same. He also tends to cut by not fanning his bristles out, and I tend to fan my bristles out way more when cutting and push a lot harder. So technique could be the ultimate thing, but these are my personal observations.
 

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Please, can you post a picture of one of your older brushes! Curious to see how it ages.

"The original synthetic brush filament, black nylon was developed just before World War II and gained wide use in the next decade with the growth in use of water-based paints." Corona Website

"Nylon brushes are very durable but may soften in hot weather or after prolonged use in latex paint." Wooster Website
These have all seen comparable use. Not dead yet. (2 Lindbeck ultra pro, the black nylon, and a Wooster Chinex which is a little more beat b/c I never liked it so use it for beater work. Almost making the pic way off at the upper left almost out of frame is an old Purdy 2.5" sash that's long since become a duster).

111698
 

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These have all seen comparable use. Not dead yet. (2 Lindbeck ultra pro, the black nylon, and a Wooster Chinex which is a little more beat b/c I never liked it so use it for beater work. Almost making the pic way off at the upper left almost out of frame is an old Purdy 2.5" sash that's long since become a duster).

View attachment 111698
Tools of the trade!

The Lindbecks look like they’re collecting a little paint in the ferrule...are they getting a hard belly? What’s the bristle composition on those?

That black nylon looks soft, and taken care of.

I love Chinex!
 

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Tools of the trade!

The Lindbecks look like they’re collecting a little paint in the ferrule...are they getting a hard belly? What’s the bristle composition on those?

That black nylon looks soft, and taken care of.

I love Chinex!
The Wooster Lindbecks are nylon/polyester. They can get hard to clean, but prewetting them helps significantly depending on length of time in paint and conditions. I've never had them get hard in the belly. These are my normal go-to brushes, but I wouldn't say that "I" chose them. Virtually everyone I ever painted with starting out used them. Since I've always been happy with them, know them well, and they're the easiest ones for me to get my hands on at my local BM, I just keep using them. (The Wooster rep "gave" the Miami to me only if I was already buying a couple of Woosters that day...which I was).

I do need to try some alternative brands in chinex. The way people talk about them, I'm thinking Wooster maybe just doesn't do chinex as well as others? Or maybe I need a different "style" while using them.
 

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Very different brush care techniques at work, here....

Maybe I'm bad, but I hang mine in a 5gallon pail of water. I almost never dry them out. I wash them, wash the bucket, and put them right back in the bucket with fresh water.

If I use oil paint, I use an old brush and toss it afterwards.
 

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Very different brush care techniques at work, here....

Maybe I'm bad, but I hang mine in a 5gallon pail of water. I almost never dry them out. I wash them, wash the bucket, and put them right back in the bucket with fresh water.

If I use oil paint, I use an old brush and toss it afterwards.
Interesting. Only the bristles submerged? A lot of ferrules will end up holding a bunch of water which then tends to make a mess upon reuse. I spin, comb, and put back in the cover. I suppose most "instructions" are to hang to dry, but they always just go back into the cover damp and it doesn't cause me any trouble that way.
 

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I submerge the bristles and just a few millimetres of the ferrules. I spin them out before use, or whack the ferrule on the toe of my boot, if I forget the spinner.

Brushes, bucket, and water are cleaned once a week.
 

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I submerge the bristles and just a few millimetres of the ferrules. I spin them out before use, or whack the ferrule on the toe of my boot, if I forget the spinner.

Brushes, bucket, and water are cleaned once a week.
I do the boot whack sometimes, but mostly just the old hand spin. This includes when I pre-wet a brush before it goes in paint. I do have an actual mechanical spinner, but mostly only use it on the rare occasion that I clean a nap.
 

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I had a Wooster rep give me a Miami when they were re-introduced. (Wooster Miami) Black nylon. IDK the chemistry or why "black" nylon matters, but it cuts great and the easiest cleaning brush I've ever had. I though Chinex were great for easy clean up when I first got one. These black nylons - even easier.
I don't know if it is the reason they choose it, but adding the black colorant to the resin makes the nylon UV resistant. Place a "natural" nylon cable tie and a black cable tie in the bright sun for a couple of weeks and check on them. The natural will probably crack when bent; the black will not. I am struggling to imagine why UV resistance would be important on a paint brush though, so that might not be a factor.
 

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I don't know if it is the reason they choose it, but adding the black colorant to the resin makes the nylon UV resistant. Place a "natural" nylon cable tie and a black cable tie in the bright sun for a couple of weeks and check on them. The natural will probably crack when bent; the black will not. I am struggling to imagine why UV resistance would be important on a paint brush though, so that might not be a factor.
Interesting. Never knew that. Note to self on cable ties...
 

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I don't know if it is the reason they choose it, but adding the black colorant to the resin makes the nylon UV resistant. Place a "natural" nylon cable tie and a black cable tie in the bright sun for a couple of weeks and check on them. The natural will probably crack when bent; the black will not. I am struggling to imagine why UV resistance would be important on a paint brush though, so that might not be a factor.
Black Nylon is the "original synthetic filament" introduced during WWII.
From what I have read, the black nylon gets "soft" in excessive heat and sunlight (and also excessive moisture- meaning after using in paint for several hours).
 

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After years of using Purdy (yes I know) I want to give something else a try. Searched around a bit last year and came across Corona but didn’t feel like ordering online at the time. Just found out a local store literally 2 minutes from me carries Corona now so I want to finally try one out. End goal is to ditch Purdy. I still like some of their brushes but the quality control has just gone down hill.

Corona
Instead of guessing which one to buy first I figured I’d ask people who have actually used them for advice. I wanna pick up a 2.5” angled sash to start and go from there. This will be specifically for interior latex painting only. In the future I will try other models but right now I am looking for something stiff enough to cut nice lines on the wall but one that can also be used for baseboard/trim without worrying too much about brush marks. With that said I am guessing I want something in the middle of the firmness scale? Other than that I just want it to clean EASY and hold it’s shape nice over time.

Wooster
I also see Wooster mentioned a lot here but the only local store I have that carries them is Home Depot. I’d be open to trying one of them based on what people from here recommend. I was searching around a lot and some people say HD Wooster are different from Wooster you can get elsewhere. Is there a “good” Wooster that HD carries and if so which one?
I personally would not bother with a Wooster unless you don't clean your brushes. I would start with a 2.5" Vegas or Excalibur (I would buy both and see what you end up liking). Wooster's DuPont brushes tips are not finished well enough, whereas Corona really goes the extra mile. Also Wooster's are flat at the top, whereas Corona dome their brushes (sort of like a chisel shape). Excalibur will clean as easy as you can possibly clean a brush since its Chinex, and will last an eternity, but you probably will get slightly nicer finish with the Vegas.
 
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