Professional Painting Contractors Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,588 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a hard time saying no. I have gotten myself into a few pickles by taking on one too many the odd time and have had to end up offering bonuses to some subs for extra long days/weeks. It is sooooo hard to tell somebody with a small window of time to complete, that you cannot do their job. We always hit our deadlines but I still haven't been able to say no to a client. I will sometimes price high, knowing it will be a crunch, but that allows for bonuses and OTfor the guys... How often do you guys say "NO" ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,096 Posts
Being a one guy operation, saying no and remaining a credible resource is much better than saying yes to more than I can handle, and letting stuff slip.
But the last couple of years it hasn't been a big problem...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,886 Posts
Had to do it more than once when a) someone needs the job done within a few days timeframe and we are all booked up or b) when someone needs a very small job done (eg one room) and we are all booked up a few months out.

In these cases, we never just say no. We always refer the customer to a local solo operator...he appreciates it a lot.
 

·
PinheadsUnite
Joined
·
30,724 Posts
Case in point, as I mentioned in this post I was almost ready to say no.

But there a part of me (call it pride, call it confidence, call it whatever) that wants to make it happen. I do like pulling the difficult jobs off. Not only does it get my adrenaline flowing, but I know it is good for my reputation.

Suzie is asked by Madge if she knows a good paperhanger, Suzie says, "As a matter of fact, Bill Archibald was most attentive to our needs"

More than a few time, someone has called me about a situation that has their back against the wall. I tell them give me an hour or two and I'll see if I can pull it together. I then call some fellow NGPP members and more than likely call Ms Frantic back with good news.

We are service. It pays to say, yes I can.

BUT make sure you can, before saying yes.
 
  • Like
Reactions: nEighter

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,187 Posts
It's easy to say no when you don't need the work. It's like if a ugly girl ask you to the prom, it's easy to say you have to do your hair that night, but say you have a date with another ugly girl, and the best looking girl in highschool ask you out, it's really (hard) to say no to her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,388 Posts
I say no all the time. I use to take on all work - now if I know there is a high probability of failure of me to complete the job satisfactorily I will turn it down. Thank god for the new lead laws coming out - because I hate scraping homes, nobody pays you enough, and you never know how much labor it will turn out to be. And can you believe folks want you to warrantee the work?!?!
I get better things to do than endless scraping and trying to warrantee a paint finish over a patchwork of 17 previous coats of paint - no thank you.

Now I'll just ask folks if their home was built after 1977 - if not, ixnay.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
10,323 Posts
I think learning to say "no" is one of the hardest things to adapt to...and one of the smartest. Keeping in mind any scheduling/manpower issues, you also have to consider the homeowners expectations as well as yours.

Holiday seasons, now through the end of the year, is always the toughest time, because the HO obviously wants it completed and looking good for the obvious reasons. I keep a couple things in mind; time frame and available manpower to do the job. Luckily, my guys will do the extra hours to get most of these done. And, at times, I have no problem in conveying to the customer there will be an added surcharge for the extra hours a/o weekends. Other times, I will just give the job to the employees, and let them keep the labor portion of the job.

Now is a good time to contact your past customers for touch-ups on jobs you have already completed. In my case this has resulted in new painting to be done in the house many times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,187 Posts
I think knowing when to say no is good and another thing to master is how to say no to your clients without making them feel rejected. Once I decide to say no to someone the next thing in my mind is, I want to keep them interested in me the next time they have something. So let them down easy, and don't run down the job they offered you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I want to parlay that people will pay good money for a positive experience.
Under promise and over deleiver. Ill say say no in a heart beat if someone tries to put me up against a deadline I dont feel comfortable with,
I totally agree with them, everyone needs to know how much you can handle, and sometimes having a very few but good strong customer is very good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,314 Posts
We have turned very few down, either scope of work was not a good fit or scheduling, just turned down a 10,000 job they want done next week!:(
 

·
PinheadsUnite
Joined
·
30,724 Posts
We have turned very few down, either scope of work was not a good fit or scheduling, just turned down a 10,000 job they want done next week!:(
Yup, there are always those red flags. Easy to say no to an obvious debacle :thumbsup:
 

·
PinheadsUnite
Joined
·
30,724 Posts
When you all are asked to do a job that is obviously a bad fit, do any of you offer a name of another who would be a better fit?
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top