Professional Painting Contractors Forum banner

1 - 20 of 82 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have multiple people saying flat is the worst, but I feel like it's the best because it's the only finish you can touch up on as easily without repainting. I don't see how it's hard to clean if you are gentle either. You're more likely to see imperfections if it isn't flat. It also shows the most color. I feel like other finishes look too gaudy.. I have people forcing me to change my wall from flat to anything other than it. Idk why it gets so much hate
 

·
Monarchski
Joined
·
148 Posts
I have multiple people saying flat is the worst, but I feel like it's the best because it's the only finish you can touch up on without repainting. I don't see how it's hard to clean if you are gentle either. You're more likely to see imperfections if it isn't flat. It also shows the most color. I feel like other finishes look too gaudy.. I have people forcing me to change my wall from flat to anything other than it. Idk why it gets so much hate
I like matte or low sheen for walls. Won't touch up? Who's paint are you using?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
I love flats. But most people don't anymore (except on ceilings). I can't actually remember the last time I did flat walls. Always matte or eggshell these days.

But Monarchski is right about touch ups. It used to be a problem if the paint wasn't flat, but these days not so much. I touched up some scuff-x eggshell recently a full year after the original job. Even with non-favorable lighting on the two spots I did, you couldn't tell.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,382 Posts
I also like flat finish for the following reasons:
1. It's a great primer finish
2. It touches up better than sheens
3. It hides and is very forgiving
5. It doesn't smell as bad as sheens
6. It dries quicker than sheens
7. It covers great
8. It is aesthetically a better choice when painting textures
9. It's less expensive than sheens
10. It's easy to paint over
11. It's great for concealing utilities and duct work in open ceiling plans
14. Nothing beats a black matte finish when used in interior design
15. Flat offers a soft and pleasant mood to any space when accompanied by compatible lighting
16. A Flat painted wall is a good companion to natural wood architectual features
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,077 Posts
It’s not about what we like or prefer, but what the customer wants or will work best for their situations: Flat for ceilings. Eggshell for most walls (though matte was becoming a bit more in vogue). And satin tor bathrooms, kitchens, and utility rooms (often walls and ceilings). Sometimes higher sheens for teen baths or kids’ bedrooms. Those seemed to be the standard sheen combinations around here for pretty much as long as I can remember.

Black matte for walls? Who were you painting for - Charles Manson or Jeffrey Dalmer?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,542 Posts
Flats can add a luxurious feel to a room, and therefore work well in bedrooms and formal rooms with light traffic; the only choice for ceilings, IMO. They need to be “fully scrubbable” if used on walls, as dirt and grime tends to collect around wall plates, corners, hallways, stairwells...a ‘no go’ if the HO has pets (or you’ll get the grease print on the favorite walls).
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,077 Posts
Has the potential for burnishing with dark flats been fixed over the years? I remember going into a home 15 years ago or so where the owner was a realtor who considered herself a designer. She’d had a bunch of her walls painted in darker colors ( purples, dark burgundy, hunter green, browns, etc) with flat sheens, all in high quality BM lines. When the light from the windows would hit them just right you could see all these lighter colored “swipes“ where the cleaners had wiped them down. They looked awful. Not sure it was the cleaners fault because I remember bumping up against the walls and leaving similar marks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Holland

·
Banned
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I like matte or low sheen for walls. Won't touch up? Who's paint are you using?
Many professional painters and contractors agree with me that with anything other than flat paint you can't touch up. It may be possible, but if you want an even finish without any noticeable sheen differences, flat paint is what touches up the best. This is well known and I disagree with you. You have to repaint the whole wall. I've heard this from professionals, and amateurs are usually the ones to say that you can touch up with anything other than than flat. You can't. I've seen several images and scenarios in which people tried to touch up non-flat and it looks horrible. Brand does not matter. If you want to argue with this to professionals you can but they'll straight up tell you that you simply can't to achieve a even surface and appearance.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Has the potential for burnishing with dark flats been fixed over the years? I remember going into a home 15 years ago or so where the owner was a realtor who considered herself a designer. She’d had a bunch of her walls painted in darker colors ( purples, dark burgundy, hunter green, browns, etc) with flat sheens, all in high quality BM lines. When the light from the windows would hit them just right you could see all these lighter colored “swipes“ where the cleaners had wiped them down. They looked awful. Not sure it was the cleaners fault because I remember bumping up against the walls and leaving similar marks.
15 years is a significant amount of time. Paint quality has changed a lot since then. I have BM flat. I dont have that problem. I really don't know what flat was like 15 years ago, but I'm pretty sure its much better now. Must have been also what the cleaners used. You aren't usually supposed to wash it with anything other than a sponge or a very soft cloth without small fibers like microfiber.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
15 years is a significant amount of time. Paint quality has changed a lot since then. I have BM flat. I dont have that problem. I really don't know what flat was like 15 years ago, but I'm pretty sure its much better now. Must have been also what the cleaners used. You aren't usually supposed to wash it with anything other than a sponge or a very soft cloth without small fibers like microfiber.
*With small fibers
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I love flats. But most people don't anymore (except on ceilings). I can't actually remember the last time I did flat walls. Always matte or eggshell these days.

But Monarchski is right about touch ups. It used to be a problem if the paint wasn't flat, but these days not so much. I touched up some scuff-x eggshell recently a full year after the original job. Even with non-favorable lighting on the two spots I did, you couldn't tell.
Scuff-x is used for that. It depends on the type it is. I'm pretty sure it also depends on the color. A lighter color is easier to touch up if it isn't flat. If it is its harder because you'll see more sheen. I wouldn't want to risk it though. If I were to paint and use flat, but overtime had spots that needed fixing up, I would want it to look like it used to and thats were flat would be best. Even though other sheens may touch up better now, I've never used scuff-x, that doesn't really mean flat finish is worse off touching up. Its still much better.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,542 Posts
Many professional painters and contractors agree with me that with anything other than flat paint you can't touch up. It may be possible, but if you want an even finish without any noticeable sheen differences, flat paint is what touches up the best. This is well known and I disagree with you. You have to repaint the whole wall. I've heard this from professionals, and amateurs are usually the ones to say that you can touch up with anything other than than flat. You can't. I've seen several images and scenarios in which people tried to touch up non-flat and it looks horrible. Brand does not matter. If you want to argue with this to professionals you can but they'll straight up tell you that you simply can't to achieve a even surface and appearance.
I don't know what you're "touching up", but I do touch-ups all the time, and they are not noticeable. What kind of paint are you using? Are "touch-ups" your sole criteria for using a flat paint?
?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,467 Posts
Many professional painters and contractors agree with me that with anything other than flat paint you can't touch up. It may be possible, but if you want an even finish without any noticeable sheen differences, flat paint is what touches up the best. This is well known and I disagree with you. You have to repaint the whole wall. I've heard this from professionals, and amateurs are usually the ones to say that you can touch up with anything other than than flat. You can't. I've seen several images and scenarios in which people tried to touch up non-flat and it looks horrible. Brand does not matter. If you want to argue with this to professionals you can but they'll straight up tell you that you simply can't to achieve a even surface and appearance.
Thatguy93, what do your customers think of using flat vs eggshell, satin or semi-gloss? Wouldn't it depend on what surface you are painting? Would you put a flat paint on a kitchen ceiling where the customer is known to cook a lot of fried foods? Ever try to clean grease off of flat vs semi-gloss paint? You can't clean grease off of flat nearly as well as off of a good semi-gloss because a flat is open and porous and allows grease to soak into the paint whereas semi-gloss seals the surface and grease stays on top of the paint allowing it to be effectively cleaned off of the surface. What do your customers have to say about using different sheens in different areas for different purposes? Have you ever lost a painting bid because you tried to convince a potential client to go with flat when they wanted eggshell or satin? I have and I try not to do that anymore because it is bad for business - mine. Any thoughts?

futtyos
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
Thatguy93, what do your customers think of using flat vs eggshell, satin or semi-gloss? Wouldn't it depend on what surface you are painting? Would you put a flat paint on a kitchen ceiling where the customer is known to cook a lot of fried foods? Ever try to clean grease off of flat vs semi-gloss paint? You can't clean grease off of flat nearly as well as off of a good semi-gloss because a flat is open and porous and allows grease to soak into the paint whereas semi-gloss seals the surface and grease stays on top of the paint allowing it to be effectively cleaned off of the surface. What do your customers have to say about using different sheens in different areas for different purposes? Have you ever lost a painting bid because you tried to convince a potential client to go with flat when they wanted eggshell or satin? I have and I try not to do that anymore because it is bad for business - mine. Any thoughts?

futtyos
Flat paint is still sealed. Nothing will soak through it, at least not any worse than semi. But is definitely a coarser finish, so the dirt doesn't slide off like with a semi.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I would like to know specifically which paints @Thatguy93 is using that he cannot touch-up with.
I'm calling BS.
I'm telling you that from the experience of others including professional painters that you cannot touch up easily, note the word easily, with anything other than flat. Brand does not matter. There is no BS in this. I call your BS on flat being literally impossible to clean as in not at all because that's definitely bullshit. Look up touch up. Search and research touch up. I guarantee you that most of the time the answer will be that it's hard to touch up without repainting. To achieve a near perfect touch up flat is the best. You can touch up with other sheets but not as good as flat this is 100% a fact.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I don't know what you're "touching up", but I do touch-ups all the time, and they are not noticeable. What kind of paint are you using? Are "touch-ups" your sole criteria for using a flat paint?
?
To achieve a more better blend, flat paint is the best. There is no argument here you can either disagree with me and have more flawed logic or agree with me with reasonable logic
 
1 - 20 of 82 Posts
Top