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One last point to add some useful info to a stupid thread.

From a design perspective flat vs satin/semi/gloss also depends on how much light is in the room, too. Flats will not reflect light around the room like a satin or semi will. Thus even using the same colors, a flat room will look darker compared to a satin room, as there will be no light reflection going on. I'm not a designer, but your room's overall ambient lighting is another thing to consider in choosing your sheen. In this respect I think sheen can be almost as important as the color itself, as the sheen can change how a certain color presents based on ambient lighting. I think it's so crucial that in some cases going flat vs satin in a room could end up like choosing a color 1-2 directions up or down in a color chart for how it ends up looking in finality with lighting in the room.
 

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What a stupid thread. I wonder if he was referring to Matte, not Flat. There is is a difference, but I don't even care anymore. Next.
 

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And why do you think they choose to use flat to cover up imperfections? It's harder to remove those and paint a different sheen and just paint flat. By getting rid of that you make them a bit more visible again. Institutions and other places that's fine to use that finish that makes sense as it's higher traffic. To say people are moving away from flat finish is ignorant. Why would they still market it? As far as I know there are still people that buy it and prefer it. I can't spot any imperfections on a flat painted wall vs one that isn't. There is a reason why flat is on houses being sold. It adds more value to it. Imagine walking into a house and seeing all this **** on the walls
Yep, this guy is a Promar 700 Flat Salesman...
 

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I would hope that the message of Flat paint won't be dismissed because of the behavior of the messenger.

Flat (matte) paint is a valid design option for architectual painting applications. It should also be noted, that the advocacy for flat paint doesn't mean it is a call as a replacement for sound enamel sheen applications, i.e. trim work, kitchens, bathrooms, and other utility areas that benefit from a higher sheen enamel . Particular those interior areas exposed to either chemical splash (Clorox), or water splash.
 

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I can't even remember the last time I put flat on walls. I know I have, but it was years ago in a condo that was going up for sale at the owners insistence. Ceilings for sure, but not on walls.
 

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I can't even remember the last time I put flat on walls. I know I have, but it was years ago in a condo that was going up for sale at the owners insistence. Ceilings for sure, but not on walls.
Flat paint remains the number one coating for residential interior ceilings and walls in California, USA. This can be corroborated by any paint supplier in California.
 

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I would add that lower sheens on interior walls in California, have become more popular in the last couple of decades. However, the choice is often based on the ability to clean the walls rather than aesthetics. Unfortunately, sheens are not compatible with the continued practice of sprayed on (and knock down) textures. Consequently, these interiors present themselves as awkward looking. I maintain that sheens look much better on smooth walls, but due to labor costs, textures will continue to be a favored finish for builders in California.
 

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Yeah, I have to imagine it's a regional thing. Up here, smooth walls are the norm. I could see using flat on textured walls for sure. Any higher sheen would just make the walls look "busy" if that's the right word for it.
 

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Yeah, I have to imagine it's a regional thing. Up here, smooth walls are the norm. I could see using flat on textured walls for sure. Any higher sheen would just make the walls look "busy" if that's the right word for it.
Sprayed texture is rarely ever consistent. Sheens just emphasize that inconsistency. However, I have seen really even texture that actually benefitted from being highlighted. But again, it's rare because of the skill involved to spray joint compound evenly, and the dependency on the equipment to facilitate that.
 

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Yeah, I have to imagine it's a regional thing. Up here, smooth walls are the norm. I could see using flat on textured walls for sure. Any higher sheen would just make the walls look "busy" if that's the right word for it.
Pretty much use flat or matte on smooth walls consistently in Toronto. Mostly washable flat (I think if they're washable it's questionable). Maybe twice in the last 4 or 5 months we have used eggshell. I only recommend eggshell over flat if they have kids or dogs.

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Flats are a General contractor's best friend. Especially given how their carpenter and taping subs more often than not provide anything but a perfect substrate to work from. (i.e. wonky and wet lumber and Frankenstein drywall installations).
 

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I have multiple people saying flat is the worst, but I feel like it's the best because it's the only finish you can touch up on as easily without repainting. I don't see how it's hard to clean if you are gentle either. You're more likely to see imperfections if it isn't flat. It also shows the most color. I feel like other finishes look too gaudy.. I have people forcing me to change my wall from flat to anything other than it. Idk why it gets so much hate
I learned that low sheen is better than flats (like Ben Moore low luster, or Duration mat) because, 1, Flats are like painting over a sponge, and take more paint and time, up to 2x more. 2. Especially outside, flats take an extra coat to look uniform (sheen). 3. They usually only touchup well inside.

I hate stains anymore because they are too Shiney. Flats do not peel as bad outside. I usually have to mix flat and satin together to get the right sheen. Mixing 1:1, you still get a flat, with a slight sheen that has the enamel holdout, which means that the next coat will take a fraction of the time to apply, and no need for 3coats outside to get a uniform sheet. Outside, it touches up better. 2 satins to one flat, gets a perfect satin sheen.
 
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