Professional Painting Contractors Forum banner

21 - 40 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
I have a Mark IV,, it is designed for spraying mud for a level5. It does that very well. It is not, however worth a dime for "textures". You have to buy an kit and it does less than you would hope for, for that kinda money.

For knock-down and orange-peel, and popcorn, I still prefer the old hopper and air compressor. If its something I have doubts about, I will get some scrap pieces of drywall and figure out how thin the mud needs to be and/or the pressure and distance etc.

I never prime before spraying unless there is an issue with stains or nicotine.

As for rolled textures,,, some guys customize their rollers to "make" theirs unique. Try it some time on some scrap. Take a roller cover, and put some mud or paint on it in a few areas, like little lines,,, let it dry and then roll some mud on with it. That makes it unique and impossible to match. The old timers called it job security.

Then you get into the stomps and brushes,,,,, but I'll quit boring you guys now,,,lol
 

·
A Brush Above
Joined
·
4,669 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
As for rolled textures,,, some guys customize their rollers to "make" theirs unique. Try it some time on some scrap. Take a roller cover, and put some mud or paint on it in a few areas, like little lines,,, let it dry and then roll some mud on with it. That makes it unique and impossible to match. The old timers called it job security.

Then you get into the stomps and brushes,,,,, but I'll quit boring you guys now,,,lol

Not boring, enlightening. This info is what I was hoping to hear. Thanks Captain!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
One of the ones I really enjoyed doing was the "wagon wheel" The light fixture in the dining or living room, we would attach a sting to the center of it, then tie a wisk broom to the string. After smearing mud with a trowel, we would spin the wisk around it, making a circle, then take a 2" paint brush and draw the "spokes" back to the light box. After that was done, we would "smash" a "roset?" (a decrotive center piece that they use now-a-days to fix an overcut box) on the box. Then tape the outer edge of the wagon wheel(after it dried) and stomp the cieling, then take a 4" paint brush and go around the edge of the ceiling, making the apperance of crown. I think it looked cool, I guess most would think it takky today.

There was alot of hand finished ceilings back then, and we called our company, "Sheetrock by Design"

I know,,, I'm rambling !!!!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,187 Posts
One of the ones I really enjoyed doing was the "wagon wheel" The light fixture in the dining or living room, we would attach a sting to the center of it, then tie a wisk broom to the string. After smearing mud with a trowel, we would spin the wisk around it, making a circle, then take a 2" paint brush and draw the "spokes" back to the light box. After that was done, we would "smash" a "roset?" (a decrotive center piece that they use now-a-days to fix an overcut box) on the box. Then tape the outer edge of the wagon wheel(after it dried) and stomp the cieling, then take a 4" paint brush and go around the edge of the ceiling, making the apperance of crown. I think it looked cool, I guess most would think it takky today.

There was alot of hand finished ceilings back then, and we called our company, "Sheetrock by Design"

I know,,, I'm rambling !!!!!!!!
Ugly
 

·
A Brush Above
Joined
·
4,669 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
There is massive variations depending on how thick the mud is, how liberally it was applied and the set up time before knockdown. The brush on the left is a crows foot, the brush on the right is a u-shaped stomp. Not the best images of final product, just a picture I snapped of the house I'm in to give a reference.
 

·
A Brush Above
Joined
·
4,669 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Yes, that is a horrible example, typically this texture has large voids and is not supposed to be overstomped. It gets used more than you know in the south, but can look vastly different depending on applicator / application.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
I haven't had the same experience as you are referring too. Hoppers work fine as long as you play with the air pressure, mixture, tip size and dial on the gun itself. Once you get it close, you still have to feather the texture to get a uniformed Finish. We have used spray cans as well and got good results, but you have to play with th daily and distance with those things.
Just my two cents

As a professional texture guy, painters should stick to paint, its what they do, and texture guys should do the texture

Yes i have worked wonders with the cans of texture but you have to know where and when to use them, and what kind.

I have never seen a very good orange peel patch job with hoppers. It is very hard to match unless you use a grayco machine. even then those are temperamental.

Believe it or not, I have been called to spray a 5x5 bathroom specifically told to use my spray rig. That is really the only thing that will do a decent job. you can get all types of textures with it. I own 4 types of machines to apply texture; a portable hand held hopper. The do okay but are limited in tip sizes. A small pump gun that does wonders on small orange peel stuff. A grayco sprayer (the second largest that they make) does a very decent job of orange peel. Knockdown is ok but not great.
And finally my 300 gallon spray rig.

I have never met a handy man that can get stuff perfect because they arent from a texture background.

Texture is an art form. Its all about pressure, thickness of mud, tip size, and know how.

If you want perfection on walls, hire a drywall punchout specifically, not a handyman or painter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
I take offence to that, in my area and most here in western Canada, painters and tapers do most of the texturing. I do think you can make your points with out calling others down.
. This ceiling was done by myself (Painter) and my buddy (Taper).


Just my two cents

As a professional texture guy, painters should stick to paint, its what they do, and texture guys should do the texture

Yes i have worked wonders with the cans of texture but you have to know where and when to use them, and what kind.

I have never seen a very good orange peel patch job with hoppers. It is very hard to match unless you use a grayco machine. even then those are temperamental.

Believe it or not, I have been called to spray a 5x5 bathroom specifically told to use my spray rig. That is really the only thing that will do a decent job. you can get all types of textures with it. I own 4 types of machines to apply texture; a portable hand held hopper. The do okay but are limited in tip sizes. A small pump gun that does wonders on small orange peel stuff. A grayco sprayer (the second largest that they make) does a very decent job of orange peel. Knockdown is ok but not great.
And finally my 300 gallon spray rig.

I have never met a handy man that can get stuff perfect because they arent from a texture background.

Texture is an art form. Its all about pressure, thickness of mud, tip size, and know how.

If you want perfection on walls, hire a drywall punchout specifically, not a handyman or painter.




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,651 Posts
I take offence to that, in my area and most here in western Canada, painters and tapers do most of the texturing. I do think you can make your points with out calling others down.
I wouldn't get too upset about it, that post is 5 yrs old. I don't think he was actually intending to call anyone down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,926 Posts
I wouldn't get too upset about it, that post is 5 yrs old. I don't think he was actually intending to call anyone down.
When I saw this thread and the amount of comments I was wondering how I could've missed this, or someone really said something to piss a bunch of people off. Maybe the Idaho painter is trying a new market :jester
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
When I saw this thread and the amount of comments I was wondering how I could've missed this, or someone really said something to piss a bunch of people off. Maybe the Idaho painter is trying a new market :jester
HAHA! Be sure to "like" all his pages and videos! can not stress that enough!

I have used the cans of texture enough to say they will rarely give satisfactory results and often it is easier in the end to bust out the hopper and I have seen pros come in to do patches that looked like crap as well.

Anyway lots of knockdown in this region and I found this tool to do pretty well most of the time for small patches and there are a few other brands on the market.

http://www.amazon.com/PPT1-Pirate-Patch-Tool/dp/B00A9ZUY5W
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,926 Posts
HAHA! Be sure to "like" all his pages and videos! can not stress that enough!

I have used the cans of texture enough to say they will rarely give satisfactory results and often it is easier in the end to bust out the hopper and I have seen pros come in to do patches that looked like crap as well.

Anyway lots of knockdown in this region and I found this tool to do pretty well most of the time for small patches and there are a few other brands on the market.

http://www.amazon.com/PPT1-Pirate-Patch-Tool/dp/B00A9ZUY5W
That looks really cool. Does it actually work well?

Most of what we have here is stippled ceilings, and smooth walls
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
It works very well but has a square border so is only good for smaller patches but could be modified by cutting the border off, otherwise it is doing a section and let dry. Another problem is with texture that is larger or smaller but another company has 3 sizes, though it may not match every pattern it usually is convincing enough.
 
21 - 40 of 45 Posts
Top