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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After the 4 hurricanes hit our area in Florida and half the houses leaked through the walls everyone started to want elastomeric paint jobs. I hated the stuff because it was so thick and if you didn't put it on right it would peel off. The reason the houses leaked in the first place was because the builders used such cheap paint and half the time it was cut with water. They also didn't tie the block into the foundation right but it was to late to fix that problem.

I always steered clients back to our normal paint job using Loxon Primer (not conditioner) and Super Paint and most homeowners used that system which worked great. I used the Loxon Primer because most of the homes in our area only had the builders paint job and a lot of those had never been primed to begin with so our primer helped seal the house.

Anyways, I was wondering how many of you do elastomeric paint jobs and what situations you use that coating on?
 

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We use elastomerics 4 to 6 times a year. Usually on stucco that is showing hairline cracks. If the stucco is solid, I'll steer the customer to something like Pittsburghs's Manor Hall or Timeless (SuperPaint or Duration for you SW folk).

I've been using elastomerics for 12+ years. I usually spec 2 coats, just to get the film build.

I actually sold a 1 coat elastomeric job this week. We did the house 10 years ago with an elastomeric. It looks pretty good-- a little fading on the west side. They want to make a slight color change and freshen it up.

Brian Phillips
 

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House Painting Reading PA
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I do alot of elastomeric coatings where I am at. I sell it as a three step system.

1. Pressure wash using 11oz tsp, 11 oz borax, 1 1/2 gallons chlorine, 3 gallons of water to make up a five of cleaner. This removes algae, mold, mildew, dirt.

2.Scrape loose paint if any left.

3.Fill in any cracks in stucco with brush grade elastomeric patching.

4. 1 coat sprayed and backrolled Sw loxon acrylic primer

5. 2 coats with one being sprayed and backrolled, second being sprayed
Sw conflex xl highbuild.

This is one system I use. I use different when homeowners desires BenMoore ofcoarse.
 

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I do alot of elastomeric coatings where I am at. I sell it as a three step system.

1. Pressure wash using 11oz tsp, 11 oz borax, 1 1/2 gallons chlorine, 3 gallons of water to make up a five of cleaner. This removes algae, mold, mildew, dirt.

2.Scrape loose paint if any left.

3.Fill in any cracks in stucco with brush grade elastomeric patching.

4. 1 coat sprayed and backrolled Sw loxon acrylic primer

5. 2 coats with one being sprayed and backrolled, second being sprayed
Sw conflex xl highbuild.

This is one system I use. I use different when homeowners desires BenMoore ofcoarse.


What is the difference between Sherlastic & Conflex? Description says Sherlastic is an elastomeric , but conflex doesnt mention anything about it.


Which should i use for repainting an E.I.F.S home (acrylic based product)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Down this way there are tons of 'Lifetime Coating' companies who spray elastomeric coatings like sw sherlastic and just re-label it with their own label.
And do you find that these companies back up their claims or do they just close up shop every couple of years and start over?

We had a lot of those companies in the Orlando area as well but most were selling "ceramic paints". One company I knew just put a ceramic additive into SW Duration and gave it a lifetime warranty. Of course he never lived in one area for more than 2 years so I think he had an easy time making that claim. Gives the industry a black eye.
He also claimed energy savings as well from the "ceramic properties" :rolleyes:.
 

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Some are fly by nighters but some have been around awhile.

I subbed for one big one that has been around for a while when I first started out until I decided that if I wanted a good reputation i should stop. They cover their bases by not giving written warranties and calling their paint " Lifetime Coating" and bottom of label says it is manufactured for them by *****. They also have the blessing of the paint manufacturer because they buy so much product.

The only painters they have employed are a couple of guys on a warranty crew who go out and fix stuff that their subs screw up. They are basically a telemarketing company who cold calls people and gives the high pressure sales pitch.

Needless to say they have tons of legal problems but they have plenty of money to fix it.

They get up to 4 times as much per square foot as anyone else gets because of their bs pitch and the customer only gets a 1 coat sprayed on (no backrolled) elastomeric paintjob. If the customer knew any better they could get a 1 mid coat, 2 top coat elastomeric job for a third of the price and done by someone who actually speaks english.
 

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Epoxy Dude
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We had a lot of those companies in the Orlando area as well but most were selling "ceramic paints". One company I knew just put a ceramic additive into SW Duration and gave it a lifetime warranty. Of course he never lived in one area for more than 2 years so I think he had an easy time making that claim. Gives the industry a black eye.
He also claimed energy savings as well from the "ceramic properties"
Isn't it a shame Nathan... Adding hollow ceramic spheres to paint just doen't make the paint ceramic.

Theoretically, ceramic microspheres can offer some insulation properties... HOWEVER, they must be compacted against each other in exactly the right ratio of particle sizes to make it happen. It also takes a thick film to get the spheres to orient. We've never seen a company do a good job backing up that kind of claim.

There are alot of paint companies making claims that are going to give 'real' ceramic coatings a 'black eye'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Theoretically, ceramic microspheres can offer some insulation properties... HOWEVER, they must be compacted against each other in exactly the right ratio of particle sizes to make it happen. It also takes a thick film to get the spheres to orient. We've never seen a company do a good job backing up that kind of claim.

There are alot of paint companies making claims that are going to give 'real' ceramic coatings a 'black eye'.
So, your saying that a "good ceramic paint" will actually help insulate a home? How much insulation are we talking about?
 

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Aw shucks! I was waiting for the Dude to come back and answer that question about r value in paint...
r
 

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I know elastomeric paints for over 20 years know as my father
sold paint from a french paint factory specialised in facade coating and
elastomeric paints since the 50's.

A great technical solution for plastered cracked outside(!) walls,
but not in every case. Because it is a thermoplast (is that english too?)
the surface of the paint pollutes faster.
 

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Freedom Maker
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Elastomeric and Brick

Question: my parents are looking at a brick house and are hoping it only has to be painted every 10 or more years. Would a "typical" (Good prep, 2 coats Duration or equivalent type-job) or an elastomeric be the best solution for longevity on previously painted brick? Thanks!

Ethan

P.S. Never used an elastomeric before.
 

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Ethan, I would have no reservation using elastomeric over suggested primer.

Never sprayed it before????

It takes a big pump and a big tip to apply properly. Do NOT thin product.
r
 

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Ethan,
Elastomerics should be sprayed and backrolled to insure a good grab & "water tight integrity" seal to substrate, with a pinhole free finish. That could be an issue with a brick substrate.Elastomerics typically show dirt faster, due to their softer finish. Hence, a maintenance cleaning program should be in-place.
Possibly look at the acrylic "hi-builds" such as "Duration", "Permanizer", "Fortis", etc. They may fit the ticket.
 

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Elastomeric paints are known for their longevity and durabilty making it ideal for exterior masonry surfaces. And are - as far as I know - meant to be applied on masonry surfaces (mainly brick and stucco).

I have done a lot of elastomeric coatings for exteriors before, and as long as you educate the customer properly and extensively about the product, they will understand the capabilities of it. Myself I prefer to spray the elastomeric as well as backroll to ensure that the product seals properly. A lot of people think that elastomeric should not be sprayed but my supplier insists that its in his opinion the only way to do it properly and efficiently. As long as its done at a higher PSI (closer to the 2500 - 3000 PSI range) with a larger tip on your spray gun.

Of course along with spraying comes the extensive preparation like pressure washing, taping off all windows with poly or masking paper (or something of the sort) and drop cloths everywhere. At least one helper is ideal to help move ladders and your airless sprayer to make things run smoothly, but it is possible as a lone gunman.
 

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Sorry to repost but I had to share this one with you guys, and I know you guys have got to hate painting this type of brick mortar if you ever have. But this was done by spraying elastomeric and I believe they call it Weeping Mortar or something to that effect. Turned out pretty nice though.


 

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After the 4 hurricanes hit our area in Florida and half the houses leaked through the walls everyone started to want elastomeric paint jobs. I hated the stuff because it was so thick and if you didn't put it on right it would peel off. The reason the houses leaked in the first place was because the builders used such cheap paint and half the time it was cut with water. They also didn't tie the block into the foundation right but it was to late to fix that problem.

I always steered clients back to our normal paint job using Loxon Primer (not conditioner) and Super Paint and most homeowners used that system which worked great. I used the Loxon Primer because most of the homes in our area only had the builders paint job and a lot of those had never been primed to begin with so our primer helped seal the house.

Anyways, I was wondering how many of you do elastomeric paint jobs and what situations you use that coating on?
I'm not sure of the breathability of elasomeric. So far, out here, I've seen heavy favor towards stains or elastomerics. I personally am going to use your system.

There are two type of stucco, breathable and not. The first is stucco applied over chicken wire. The second involves styrofoam and built in venting. Similar to drivit. I'm thinking this has an effect on whether or not I'd use elastomeric. I'd use it on the non-breathing type, but most are just the regular stucco.
 

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i like using the elastomeric for stucco and adding latex conditioner to it when i need to cut in stufff by hand and faster than just the super thick elastomeric

we must strive to become better ancestors
 
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