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I've been a painter for 2 plus decades and was always told early on "you need to backroll ceilings if they're sprayed"

You don't. Plain and simple. I have been spraying ceilings in promar 400 flat for a decade without backrolling and after it completely dries (24 hours). It looks flawless.

Then comes the painters who will tell you "well how do you do touchups"? With a microfiber roller.

I think painters get worried because flat paint dries very inconsistently and doesn't dry like an eggshell so it doesn't look good right away. The next day it'll look better than any backrolled ceiling you've ever done.
 

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I've been a painter for 2 plus decades and was always told early on "you need to backroll ceilings if they're sprayed"

You don't. Plain and simple. I have been spraying ceilings in promar 400 flat for a decade without backrolling and after it completely dries (24 hours). It looks flawless.

Then comes the painters who will tell you "well how do you do touchups"? With a microfiber roller.

I think painters get worried because flat paint dries very inconsistently and doesn't dry like an eggshell so it doesn't look good right away. The next day it'll look better than any backrolled ceiling you've ever done.
This is so timely because I was actually wanted to do some digging on this as well.

I've been painting just as long and I've done both, spray and backroll ceilings. I have back rolled alot of ceilings to date because I just got tired going back in for touch up after electricians and other trades made a mess of the ceilings. On the other hand the reason why I'm on is I just finished spraying 6000sqft of ceilings on this job as the builder is maticuious and know I probably won't have touch ups. I will say though, not very happy with the way some rooms have dried.

I sealed ceilings first then primer coat before spraying two top coats. Client chose regal matte which I don't like the sprayed look. Used the same promar 2 or 400 in the past which I loved, unfortunately can't find where I live.

I think there is a place for both as no job is the same. When it comes to large open ceilings it can be very difficult. I find smaller lower ceilings heights give a better look possibly because of lightning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This is so timely because I was actually wanted to do some digging on this as well.

I've been painting just as long and I've done both, spray and backroll ceilings. I have back rolled alot of ceilings to date because I just got tired going back in for touch up after electricians and other trades made a mess of the ceilings. On the other hand the reason why I'm on is I just finished spraying 6000sqft of ceilings on this job as the builder is maticuious and know I probably won't have touch ups. I will say though, not very happy with the way some rooms have dried.

I sealed ceilings first then primer coat before spraying two top coats. Client chose regal matte which I don't like the sprayed look. Used the same promar 2 or 400 in the past which I loved, unfortunately can't find where I live.

I think there is a place for both as no job is the same. When it comes to large open ceilings it can be very difficult. I find smaller lower ceilings heights give a better look possibly because of lightning.
Regal looks awful on ceilings especially backrolled. Dries way too fast.

I actually can't stand Regal paint in any sheen. Definitely high quality paint but looks like crap imo.
 

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I've been a painter for 2 plus decades and was always told early on "you need to backroll ceilings if they're sprayed" You don't. Plain and simple. I have been spraying ceilings in promar 400 flat for a decade without backrolling and after it completely dries (24 hours). It looks flawless. Then comes the painters who will tell you "well how do you do touchups"? With a microfiber roller. I think painters get worried because flat paint dries very inconsistently and doesn't dry like an eggshell so it doesn't look good right away. The next day it'll look better than any backrolled ceiling you've ever done.
I totally agree. I've been painting for 25 years , and have always sprayed ceilings without back rolling.
 

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I've been a painter for 2 plus decades and was always told early on "you need to backroll ceilings if they're sprayed"

You don't. Plain and simple. I have been spraying ceilings in promar 400 flat for a decade without backrolling and after it completely dries (24 hours). It looks flawless.

Then comes the painters who will tell you "well how do you do touchups"? With a microfiber roller.

I think painters get worried because flat paint dries very inconsistently and doesn't dry like an eggshell so it doesn't look good right away. The next day it'll look better than any backrolled ceiling you've ever done.
I've been a painter for 2 plus decades and was always told early on "you need to backroll ceilings if they're sprayed"

You don't. Plain and simple. I have been spraying ceilings in promar 400 flat for a decade without backrolling and after it completely dries (24 hours). It looks flawless.

Then comes the painters who will tell you "well how do you do touchups"? With a microfiber roller.

I think painters get worried because flat paint dries very inconsistently and doesn't dry like an eggshell so it doesn't look good right away. The next day it'll look better than any backrolled ceiling you've ever done.
If you can pull it off, go for it. I've never had luck on huge open concept ceilings without backrolling. On new construction I believe in atleast backrolling the prime coat as to ensure a good Bond with the drywall and plaster. It also adds some build to hide plaster imperfections. I'm not sure it's so much a myth as it is an MPI standard.
 

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LOL… despite the definitive aspect of this thread’s title, I suspect the “myth” of back rolling will still be alive and well by the time this thread has run it’s course. There are just too many variables (products, cover types, different styles of painting, textures, sheens, etc) to declare there is always only one way to do something and end up with the same results.
 

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I do think @Woodco brought up a good point regarding textured ceilings rarely ever needing to be backrolled. I thought the same as I read the OP, but they didn't specify. We see maybe 10% smooth wall here in Oregon, so I'm certainly not the authority on what should or shouldn't be done. Come to think of it, nobody here is the authority on what others should or shouldn't do. Too many variables anyways.
 
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