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Red Seal
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Hard to beat PPG Amerlock 2/400. Surface tolerant, submersible, fast cure.

You've had better results with it than I have then. I got this stuff to prime some steel water pipe - thankfully i've learned through bitter experience to test all new products before using them full scale on a project. The stuff I got was still soft after 4 days of curing. And yes, it was properly mixed with the correct hardener.

The Amercoat 370 works well for me though. Tough as nails and fast cure times, though it doesn't like to lay down much.
 

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Premium Member
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You've had better results with it than I have then. I got this stuff to prime some steel water pipe - thankfully i've learned through bitter experience to test all new products before using them full scale on a project. The stuff I got was still soft after 4 days of curing. And yes, it was properly mixed with the correct hardener.

The Amercoat 370 works well for me though. Tough as nails and fast cure times, though it doesn't like to lay down much.
The only concern I would have with Amerlock 370 is that it isn't considered a surface tolerant coating, from what I could tell. And as you are aware, Amerlock 2 is considered surface tolerant. (Not requiring thorough removal of rust, moisture, or salt water contamination prior to application.)
 

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Red Seal
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40 Posts
The only concern I would have with Amerlock 370 is that it isn't considered a surface tolerant coating, from what I could tell. And as you are aware, Amerlock 2 is considered surface tolerant. (Not requiring thorough removal of rust, moisture, or salt water contamination prior to application.)
True, it's not surface tolerant. One should generally not be painting over rust and contaminants wherever possible however....particularly over surfaces with a high moisture content as that's just begging for failure. I use it on concrete after diamond grinding - it serves me well for that purpose.
 

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True, it's not surface tolerant. One should generally not be painting over rust and contaminants wherever possible however....particularly over surfaces with a high moisture content as that's just begging for failure. I use it on concrete after diamond grinding - it serves me well for that purpose.

In general, steel substrates should be free from moisture and blasted to a 2 mil anchor. But in my experience working in refineries, treatment plants, and various other industrial settings, often a surface tolerant epoxy is the only option. It's definitely the workhorse of the industrial coatings industry, onshore and off.
 

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Epoxy finishes look fantastic once completed.

The problem with epoxies, in terms of the polyamides and amines, they don't hold up at all to UV's. An epoxy system with UV exposure should include a UV resistant top coat like a polyurethane, or even a waterborne acrylic, provided it is top coated within the cure window of the epoxy.
 
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