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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've found a fast, waste-free method of applying Gardz to new drywall using a smooth-nap, sponge, power-roller cover like the one pictured below. My Graco 395(equipped with the digital display) is able to maintain fairly low pressures reliably, and I set it to max-out at about 500psi for this process. You can hold the trigger wide open while rolling quickly upward for the wet-out, and then back-roll around with trigger-bursts as needed to distribute and feed the more absorbent areas like wide drywall joints. You will use a lot of Gardz, but not a drop has to end up on the floor.

I've found that rapid wet-out is essential, as partial wet-out will cause the Gardz to set sufficiently to actually "self hold-out" almost instantly on new drywall causing splotchy results. You quickly learn how to keep the sponge saturated enough to feed the surface all it wants to drink, but dry enough to mop up any excess without dripping.

The result when dry is a very even plastic-like surface that grips any subsequently applied coating like no other as shown in the second photo. Paint applies and dries evenly over the entire surface and all evidence of joints disappear completely with the first coat. It will pass any peel-test you care to try.

Give it a try!



 

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Spam or not, I've rolled out new drywall and joint compound with Gardz and 18" rollers and after getting the hang of it, I have not had the problems you describe. But, the finish with Gardz is fantastic. I now love the smell, because it looks amazing.

Applying paint on top of Gardz is so smoooooth, as the surface is sealed up so well. 1 coat over clear gardz looks better that 1 coat over white primer (doesn't mean much since I always do 2 coats, but, hey, its cool).
 

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So, how many people have been priming homes with Gardz? What are the advantages? I've used it on several wallpaper removal jobs and like it for that, but I'm just not sure it would be worth using on a new home. It sure does dry hard.

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Spam or not, I've rolled out new drywall and joint compound with Gardz and 18" rollers and after getting the hang of it, I have not had the problems you describe. But, the finish with Gardz is fantastic. I now love the smell, because it looks amazing.

Applying paint on top of Gardz is so smoooooth, as the surface is sealed up so well. 1 coat over clear gardz looks better that 1 coat over white primer (doesn't mean much since I always do 2 coats, but, hey, its cool).
Agree 100%! Amazing stuff!Keeps topcoat uniform.:thumbsup:
 

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bbair said:
So, how many people have been priming homes with Gardz? What are the advantages? I've used it on several wallpaper removal jobs and like it for that, but I'm just not sure it would be worth using on a new home. It sure does dry hard.

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Same here, would love to hear from those that do.
 

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Gardz provides a uniform, sealed surface, more so than primer. No differences in porosity on taped areas, or on drywall. Paint doesn't look any different on either area. Sheen is absolutely consistent. I don't use it for every job, but I used it on a level 5 job (no bare drywall) and it looked great as well. Maybe not revolutionary, but it is cool stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Why routinely use Gardz on new drywall? Because:

So, how many people have been priming homes with Gardz? What are the advantages? I've used it on several wallpaper removal jobs and like it for that, but I'm just not sure it would be worth using on a new home. It sure does dry hard.

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Good Question, I think there are several advantages:

1- EVEN ABSORPTION- Various thicknesses of mud over drywall paper produce huge variations in absorptive behavior that can persist through a number of coats of primer and paint. This results in variation of paint absorption and varying drying time that have effects on the sheen of the final finish. If you view the wall or ceiling from various angles you can actually see the drywall joints because of this variation in sheen. Gardz absolutely eliminates this problem by creating an even surface with excellent adhesion but essentially zero absorption.

2- ADHESION- As a builder I've had serious problems with adhesion of PVA sealers and primers to drywall joints. I've had the experience of masking finished walls, for example, along the top of newly installed baseboards so they could be painted, only to have the paint and primer peel off of the drywall along with the(high-quality) masking tape- a real heartbreaker. PVA sealers and primers simply do not penetrate deeply enough to polymerize the substrate and get a reliable grip. That is what Gardz is all about- deep penetration and solidification of the surface.

3- CONTAMINATION RESISTANCE- Any dust remaining on the surface after sanding drywall joints can severely compromise the already limited ability of PVA sealers and primers to bond to the surface. With Gardz, you don't even need to be very careful with drywall dust, it simply saturates it along with penetrating into the surface and completely incorporates it into the matrix.

All of this is pretty much true with both smooth-wall and lightly textured drywall. I personally mix my texturing mud 50/50 with good quality paint and apply it over the gardz- but my texture is only intended to provide a pleasant texture, not to be a sin-hider.
 

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Hartstoc said:
Good Question, I think there are several advantages:

.

2- ADHESION- As a builder I've had serious problems with adhesion of PVA sealers and primers to drywall joints.
Pretty dang good paint post for a builder! Nicely done!
 

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