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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Home owners want the interior and exterior of their front door to look the same. What, if any, are the drawbacks of using an exterior product on the interior of the door. Most likely I will be using Proluxe or a marine varnish (will be stained first if this route is chosen).

Also, wondering if anyone can recommend a good (if they still exist) stripper for marine varnish.
 

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Home owners want the interior and exterior of their front door to look the same. What, if any, are the drawbacks of using an exterior product on the interior of the door. Most likely I will be using Proluxe or a marine varnish (will be stained first if this route is chosen).

Also, wondering if anyone can recommend a good (if they still exist) stripper for marine varnish.
I did some hickory t&g with door and window about a two months ago, thin it with 10% corotech brushing reducer and its like liquid glass. Doesn't dry as hard as interior urethanes but that's about all you'll notice. Door and windows also dries more clear than spar and other marine varnishes being mainly phenolic resin.
 

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If it were me, I'd go waterborne. It looks like theres a porch over it. If there isnt sun beating on it, you dont need to get as hardcore.

To me, waterborne spars look a lot closer to a normal poly. They dont have that softness. And it wont outgas the inside of their house for days.

I love this stuff here: Super easy to work with, looks great, short recoat window.... Interior / Exterior Poly WB Gloss (Qt)

They put it on floors and boats....
 

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What ever you spray as a color on the backround.spray a coat of isolator followed by 2 x 6 mil on both sides 2k poly and walk away.
 

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Its been a while since I used strippers, but MEK (methylene ethyl ketone) strippers are effective and not extremely toxic (if I'm remembering correctly), where Methylene ethyl Chloride is the stripper you want to avoid (carcinogenic)

What direction does that door face? Looks like it has some exposure to the elements from the visible weathering near the bottom. Is it from sun exposure?

I like Spar for exterior wood doors and Polyurethane on the inside. I like them because I'm familiar with them and they are predictable and durable, and maintenance is pretty easy (scuff and re-coat). I also like the amber notes of oil-based varnish as they age, and how they look on real wood (they accentuate the grain and add depth).
 

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@Woodco i never brush the exterior door even interior doors or the cabinet. That needs a special talent and a big heart to take in when you see those brush marks.I am part OCD.
I hear some say use Advance :ROFLMAO: . anyways that is another debate to fight.
"Kill Room " that is what i do first at the job site.Second Ram board or red rosin and finally the air scrubbers.
A day before i let the HO know that i will be spraying and i do my thing alone.
Each and every day before i leave i make sure all the job site is free of dust and over spray and orginize equipment's on the way which may cause home owner trip or hurt them self's.
Up to this point nobody told me i should be brushing the paint instead spraying.I mean Nobody. If they tell me i basically walk away and let them do them self's or there is always somebody can do that but not me.

Also you really do not need to use Catalyst.You can use the Poly by it self or there is cross linker you may use or Deft or Varathane or some other Diy type single component Polys.I mean you have a choice
I basically rather use the most possible protection available than coming back the second time.
I make my living with my name on the job. I do not have a single advertisement elsewhere. I am booked 5 months ahead and i am happy.
Sorry for my long post. Guess i was so much frustrated about the ppl who do not give enough attention to masking and protecting them self's and customers.
 

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I didnt say anything about brushing. I dont know where you got that from.... But honestly, I probably would, and it would still look great.

The only thing Im saying is to be aware that this is an occupied house (Im assuming this anyway) so offgassing after the job is done is an issue. I didnt realize you didnt need the catalyst for the poly, Thats really all you had to say. "You dont have to use the catalyst." But I have to ask.... whats the point of using it then?

If you have air scrubbers, good for you. The vast majority of us dont have industrial cabinet shop grade equipment at our disposal to do a Rolls Royce job. Maybe the client doesnt want to pay the prices you would charge. I know I would rather hire someone like Pete to do a good job at a fair price, than a company that would do a perfect job at 4 times the price, and have to wait five months for it. Im not doubting your work, nor telling you how to do things, so theres really no need for the tirade.
 

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@Woodco i never brush the exterior door even interior doors or the cabinet. That needs a special talent and a big heart to take in when you see those brush marks.I am part OCD.
I hear some say use Advance :ROFLMAO: . anyways that is another debate to fight.
"Kill Room " that is what i do first at the job site.Second Ram board or red rosin and finally the air scrubbers.
A day before i let the HO know that i will be spraying and i do my thing alone.
Each and every day before i leave i make sure all the job site is free of dust and over spray and orginize equipment's on the way which may cause home owner trip or hurt them self's.
Up to this point nobody told me i should be brushing the paint instead spraying.I mean Nobody. If they tell me i basically walk away and let them do them self's or there is always somebody can do that but not me.

Also you really do not need to use Catalyst.You can use the Poly by it self or there is cross linker you may use or Deft or Varathane or some other Diy type single component Polys.I mean you have a choice
I basically rather use the most possible protection available than coming back the second time.
I make my living with my name on the job. I do not have a single advertisement elsewhere. I am booked 5 months ahead and i am happy.
Sorry for my long post. Guess i was so much frustrated about the ppl who do not give enough attention to masking and protecting them self's and customers.
Just so you know, this is a forum for Painters and Painting Contractors. It's not a Cabinet Re-finishing forum. I know everything you do has to be sprayed with 2k poly and conversion varnish, but 95% of the people on here know how to use a paint brush and there are very good reasons for using them. Just saying. A paint brush is NOT a diy product. I also would not expect a whole household to vacate the premises just so I can paint the front door. That ridiculous.
 

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@finishesbykevyn woodwork suppose to be sprayed. Period. it does not matter is a door or cabinet or something else.
If you cannot spray a good product that protects the wood just sub construct to somebody who can do the job.
Just because you love brushing and do not like spray or solvent or similar this does not give you the right to push my buttons.
where did i say brushing is diy? i said use some big box store diy type product like varathane or deft or what ever.

You are right i am at the wrong place.
 

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@finishesbykevyn woodwork suppose to be sprayed. Period. it does not matter is a door or cabinet or something else.
If you cannot spray a good product that protects the wood just sub construct to somebody who can do the job.
Just because you love brushing and do not like spray or solvent or similar this does not give you the right to push my buttons.
where did i say brushing is diy? i said use some big box store diy type product like varathane or deft or what ever.

You are right i am at the wrong place.
Says who?? Now your just being silly. There are multiple ways of applying products depending on the situation and material. I know most of your work is done "in the shop" but in a repaint scenario, spraying is not always an option. So stop derailing this thread with a 1 trick pony response.
 

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@finishesbykevyn woodwork suppose to be sprayed. Period. it does not matter is a door or cabinet or something else.
The vast majority of designers & architects I’ve worked with preferred the hand finished look vs sprayed, not wanting a manufactured look which often clashed with their designs & architecture.

I’ve even had a couple clients ask me to price out removing Italian 2K finishes on new window & door packs followed by hand finishing, due to not liking what was described as a plasti-dipped look.

There’s a huge demand for hand finishing of millwork nowadays vs sprayed. I’ve even had a top millwork firm employing 97, hire me to come in & train their finishing department in the art of hand finishing due to the demand, their finishers having prior experience in spray-only finishes which limited them to specific markets. And not to be taken the wrong way, in my opinion, laying down a nice finish with a spray gun requires a very limited skill-set….
 

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@finishesbykevyn woodwork suppose to be sprayed. Period. it does not matter is a door or cabinet or something else.
If you cannot spray a good product that protects the wood just sub construct to somebody who can do the job.
Just because you love brushing and do not like spray or solvent or similar this does not give you the right to push my buttons.
where did i say brushing is diy? i said use some big box store diy type product like varathane or deft or what ever.

You are right i am at the wrong place.
Sprayed finishes have their place of course. I would really recommend you attend a class on fine paints of Europe to get a sense of what can be achieved with a brush.
Here are examples of some brush work from a customer of mine:
Property Stairs Wood Interior design Architecture
Building Table Wood Interior design Flooring
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Its been a while since I used strippers, but MEK (methylene ethyl ketone) strippers are effective and not extremely toxic (if I'm remembering correctly), where Methylene ethyl Chloride is the stripper you want to avoid (carcinogenic)

What direction does that door face? Looks like it has some exposure to the elements from the visible weathering near the bottom. Is it from sun exposure?

I like Spar for exterior wood doors and Polyurethane on the inside. I like them because I'm familiar with them and they are predictable and durable, and maintenance is pretty easy (scuff and re-coat). I also like the amber notes of oil-based varnish as they age, and how they look on real wood (they accentuate the grain and add depth).
Thanks Holland,
I do not use strippers very often, and have yet to find one that works well. Hoping that I can sand all of the flat areas and use the stripper only in areas that using a sander is not possible. My shop starting carrying Rock Miracle stripper. I have never heard of it, but going to give it a try.

The door faces south, but is covered. So, not sure how much direct sun it gets. The wood behind the wreth is much darker than the rest of the door. I have already told them that it might be impossible to remove the dark area.
I think the home owner told me he put a marine varnish on the door, and he wants something that would be as durable.
 

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If you have a budget that allows you to take your time on the prep (stripping and proper sanding ), you should be able to get rid of the dark area behind the wreath, or at least tone it down significantly. Will look great when you’re done, a lot better than it currently looks!

btw- Spar is a traditional marine varnish.
———

I don’t have a lot of faith in “miracle” strippers.
Since it’s mostly outside, I would personally use a solvent based stripper, and get it done fast and well.
Let us know what you use and if it works!
———

Some thoughts regarding stripping…
let the stripper do the work. Keep it wet until it starts to wrinkle the film. Don’t fight the varnish trying to remove it. Scrape the soft stuff, repeat the first step until the stubborn areas soften. Rinse only when stripping is done to neutralise the stripper, and clean the surface. Be careful not to damage the wood, as it will be soft at this stage. Take your time.

Wear a respirator, rubber gloves, and glasses.

Plastic tarps under the immediate area, then maybe painters tarps on top of that to absorb moisture.

tape everything off. Stripper will damage anything it touches. Check your shoes before walking off the tarp area.
I would strongly recommend removing the door if possible, and stripping it in the garage…maybe get a cove door from the lumberyard, or a sheet of plywood to cover the opening. Maybe just plastic if it’s only for a day.

Have on hand:
-empty cardboard box for stripper residue.
-extra Garbage bags
-scrapers
-sharpened dowels
-Mineral spirits
-nylon brushes and tooth brushes for cleaning stripper residue when done (using oms).
-extra rags
-bucket of water for oily rags

should take about 4-6 hours to strip.
let dry overnight (or until completely dry) and then come back to sand and varnish (just clearing it, no stain?).
 

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@finishesbykevyn woodwork suppose to be sprayed. Period. it does not matter is a door or cabinet or something else.

where did i say brushing is diy?

So, if you didnt say it in the above statement, how about here: "That needs a special talent and a big heart to take in when you see those brush marks.I am part OCD."

Thats pretty much twice where you implied brushing is inferior...

Dont get me wrong, I always prefer sprayed, but a GOOD painter will know when setting up to spray a small project isnt economically reasonable. Not to mention, you'd almost have to TRY to leave brush strokes in poly (oil OR waterborne) for it to not be smooth....

BTW, the cherry staircase in my profile picture.... I did with a brush. I sprayed all the rest of the woodwork in the house though, except for the crankouts, which my dumbass boss insisted couldnt be sprayed, even though ive sprayed them before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
If you have a budget that allows you to take your time on the prep (stripping and proper sanding ), you should be able to get rid of the dark area behind the wreath, or at least tone it down significantly. Will look great when you’re done, a lot better than it currently looks!

btw- Spar is a traditional marine varnish.
———

I don’t have a lot of faith in “miracle” strippers.
Since it’s mostly outside, I would personally use a solvent based stripper, and get it done fast and well.
Let us know what you use and if it works!
———

Some thoughts regarding stripping…
let the stripper do the work. Keep it wet until it starts to wrinkle the film. Don’t fight the varnish trying to remove it. Scrape the soft stuff, repeat the first step until the stubborn areas soften. Rinse only when stripping is done to neutralise the stripper, and clean the surface. Be careful not to damage the wood, as it will be soft at this stage. Take your time.

Wear a respirator, rubber gloves, and glasses.

Plastic tarps under the immediate area, then maybe painters tarps on top of that to absorb moisture.

tape everything off. Stripper will damage anything it touches. Check your shoes before walking off the tarp area.
I would strongly recommend removing the door if possible, and stripping it in the garage…maybe get a cove door from the lumberyard, or a sheet of plywood to cover the opening. Maybe just plastic if it’s only for a day.

Have on hand:
-empty cardboard box for stripper residue.
-extra Garbage bags
-scrapers
-sharpened dowels
-Mineral spirits
-nylon brushes and tooth brushes for cleaning stripper residue when done (using oms).
-extra rags
-bucket of water for oily rags

should take about 4-6 hours to strip.
let dry overnight (or until completely dry) and then come back to sand and varnish (just clearing it, no stain?).
Thanks Holland!

Do not know if taking the door off would be possible. I work alone and exterior doors weigh a ton.
I am figuring three days to strip and prep both sides of the door and side lights.

What are sharpened dowells for?

I most likely will not be doing this work until the spring...if I get the job. I might try to do the interior sooner. There are new floors being installed. The door is only a small part of a large job, which is the last stage of a much larger job due to water damage as a result of a faulty clamp on a plastic pipe.
 

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Thanks Holland!

Do not know if taking the door off would be possible. I work alone and exterior doors weigh a ton.
I am figuring three days to strip and prep both sides of the door and side lights.

What are sharpened dowells for?

I most likely will not be doing this work until the spring...if I get the job. I might try to do the interior sooner. There are new floors being installed. The door is only a small part of a large job, which is the last stage of a much larger job due to water damage as a result of a faulty clamp on a plastic pipe.
sharpened dowels can be used for scraping loose varnish from interior corners. very useful for doors.
They are soft and won't damage door, can be re-sharpened.

That brings up an old, familiar topic: should painting be done before or after the floors are installed?
Of course, painting should always be done before new floors are installed, but not everyone on PT feels that way.
 
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