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Hi All,

I've just started my own residential painting business (ThePaintExpress - working on the webpage now...) and although I'm comfortable with interior painting the only exterior work I've ever done was my own home. I went out to do a bid last weekend on the interior of this cottage and the owner asked for an exterior bid as well. I'll sum it up but there's one picture that may help and I've attached it for reference.

The siding is a compressed wood (hardboard?) with embossing and it's in good condition but the previous paint job is a really smooth sheen. I'm not sure if I need to sand the entire exterior or just use something like Krud Kutter (gloss off) to surface prep it. Also, the nail heads of which there are many are starting the rust. Whoever installed this stuff did NOT use galvanized nails unfortunately. So my thoughts are the entire exterior should be power washed, DE glossed, primed and then painted.

The hole in the picture is going to be repaired correctly by the carpenter doing the interior remodeling. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated....thanks in advance.
 

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Well, if they really didn't use galvanized nails no paint job is ever going to look good. Sanding what looks like textured wood will be almost impossible. Because the nails are going to want to rust and if you are worried about paint adhering to the existing paint, I would prime with oil and then top coat with your choice of paint.
 

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Looks straight forward so why make it complicated? Do a soft wash and rinse. Normal prep, spot prime nail holes, and paint with mooreguard or whatever flavor of exterior paint you like. Don't sand or degloss wtf? Honestly this question seems very DIY oriented. Maybe you should post an introduction?
 

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Degloss the siding?? Unless its high gloss, or oil base, paint sticks to (clean) paint. ESPECIALLY outside, where its nice and weathered. Its been deglossed by nature anyway. Just powerwash it like every other painter in the world would do. Personally, Ive never worried about rusty nail heads, but if it you want, just rattle can them with something.
 

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The trim on my new home is MiraTec press board with the fake wood grain and the builder didn’t install/finish according to manufacture’s spec, and the EP zinc coated wire nails are beginning to rust. I’m probably going to clean the rust off as best I can with a soft brass wire brush or 3M maroon pad and wash everything down with a non-chlorine cleanser due to the sodium chloride salt byproduct from chlorine bleach has a tendency to promote rust even with 304 stainless. I’m considering spotting the nail heads, rusty or not, with either a zinc-rich primer or a red oxide primer and top coat with “Duration?” Any thoughts on Duration being I’ve heard it provides great resistance against rust bleeding through the film, yet never used SW paints so I’m concerned how it performs in general sans the rusting fastener issue.

There was a recent local class action suit filed against a local developer by members of the HOA due to having used EP wire nails for installing the MiraTec and not the specified 304 or better stainless or the lesser hot dipped galvanized…plus the press board hadn’t been primed and finished to spec and is beginning to delaminate thinking that members of my HOA might follow a similar course of action.
 

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Not to hijack this thread, the builder also used EP nails on the Hardi Plank siding where they face nailed the butt-joints and on the bottom course. Those are rusting as well. The builder’s painters used Resilience on both the siding and trim which is mildewing badly only on the trim. Was hoping someone here could provide feedback on Duration as an alternative to Resilience. I might add that although I’m overly critical when it comes to maintaining high quality standards, the painters did a really great job.
Edit:
Also looking for recommendations on a cleanser to kill and remove mildew and don’t want to use sodium hypochlorite or similar chemicals which promote rust.
 

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As far as Im concerned, if the nail is rusty on the head, then it may be rusting all the way through causing deep damage. Priming the head is only a temporary measure. Only sure fire way is to pull the nails. But who wants to pay for that is the question.. :LOL:
 

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As far as Im concerned, if the nail is rusty on the head, then it may be rusting all the way through causing deep damage. Priming the head is only a temporary measure. Only sure fire way is to pull the nails. But who wants to pay for that is the question.. :LOL:
In my case it wouldn’t be possible to pull the 18 gauge wire nails yet I did pull a couple to evaluate, and there’s only superficial rust on the heads plus there’s no water intrusion so I’m not too concerned the fasteners will completely rust out in my lifetime. I’m addressing it now as more of a preventive measure being less than 10% of the fasteners are showing signs of rust.
 

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Hi All,

I've just started my own residential painting business (ThePaintExpress - working on the webpage now...) and although I'm comfortable with interior painting the only exterior work I've ever done was my own home. I went out to do a bid last weekend on the interior of this cottage and the owner asked for an exterior bid as well. I'll sum it up but there's one picture that may help and I've attached it for reference.

The siding is a compressed wood (hardboard?) with embossing and it's in good condition but the previous paint job is a really smooth sheen. I'm not sure if I need to sand the entire exterior or just use something like Krud Kutter (gloss off) to surface prep it. Also, the nail heads of which there are many are starting the rust. Whoever installed this stuff did NOT use galvanized nails unfortunately. So my thoughts are the entire exterior should be power washed, DE glossed, primed and then painted.

The hole in the picture is going to be repaired correctly by the carpenter doing the interior remodeling. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated....thanks in advance.
I am not a fan of this type of siding. There are a few names for it, but in the end it’s just a fancy chip board (OSB) with exterior glue. If it’s hardboard Masonite-type siding, it’s treated the same way: use solid stain. It weathers poorly in areas of water exposure, predictably, such as water shed areas from roofs, and etc… it is important to make sure that the boards nearest the ground are monitored and kept in good condition, as rain and snow tend to cause these boards to fail first.

Latex solid stain is common maintenance for this type of siding if it has not been painted already (to treat it the same as Cedar in this regard). Can stain directly onto surface as is, but soft wash 1-2 weeks before painting work is recommended. Re-stain every 7-10 years. Builders sometimes spot prime nail heads at time of install, but if they are rusting it might be simplest to price a coat to prime entire siding using an oil based primer tinted t color, and then top coat with latex solid stain. Caulk with paintable caulk. Good luck with your business. I am located in Wisconsin too,so I deal with the same regional weather conditions as you. Is that Lake Michigan, or another lake?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am not a fan of this type of siding. There are a few names for it, but in the end it’s just a fancy chip board (OSB) with exterior glue. If it’s hardboard Masonite-type siding, it’s treated the same way: use solid stain. It weathers poorly in areas of water exposure, predictably, such as water shed areas from roofs, and etc… it is important to make sure that the boards nearest the ground are monitored and kept in good condition, as rain and snow tend to cause these boards to fail first.

Latex solid stain is common maintenance for this type of siding if it has not been painted already (to treat it the same as Cedar in this regard). Can stain directly onto surface as is, but soft wash 1-2 weeks before painting work is recommended. Re-stain every 7-10 years. Builders sometimes spot prime nail heads at time of install, but if they are rusting it might be simplest to price a coat to prime entire siding using an oil based primer tinted t color, and then top coat with latex solid stain. Caulk with paintable caulk. Good luck with your business. I am located in Wisconsin too,so I deal with the same regional weather conditions as you. Is that Lake Michigan, or another lake?
That is a small lake in central Wisconsin called Wood Lake - it's between Westfield and Coloma.

I appreciate all the responses, with almost zero experience doing exteriors for customers this is extremely helpful. I'm likely going to bid this by adding in an oil based priming coat to ensure no issues down the road and follow the general advice of a soft wash a week or two out if I get hired for the job.

Thank you to all that replied
 

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I've generally found that if the rustiness applies to the entire nail, then 1) you can tell b/c the head has worked its way out and 2) it means that there are moisture problems (leaks or whatnot) that need to be addressed or you can R&R all the nails you want but still end up with the same problem before too long.

For typical rusty nail heads only (where the head just ends up getting exposed) I generally run around with a cordless rotary tool and grinder head. Ground the head, spot prime, slap a generous coating of a quality caulk over them and then go with it. I figure that for just plain head rust it's about getting them sealed up from moisture.
 

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Sorry bro...but maybe pass on exterior part for now...and congrats on doing the work for web presence.

I read and re-read your post and it doesn't seem like u want to do exterior, which is fine.

Just because you're there interior-wise doesn't mean u have to do the exterior

If I'm wrong, go for it and re-read the other posts...they're good and do more research.

I don't specialize in exteriors and PT folks have helped alot in regards to the exterior I've done.

Over my career of self employment that is in its later stages, I have taken projects what I thought were 60/40, 50/50, profit versus learning curve....cuz I want to know what it's really like and ended up less than those percentages. I still do this, but less.

I guess my point is listen to your gut. If you want try a different paint project and expect to make the same profit as interiors, you won't...but you choose it because you can afford it while broadening your skill set.

Cheers
 

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Sorry bro...but maybe pass on exterior part for now...and congrats on doing the work for web presence.

I read and re-read your post and it doesn't seem like u want to do exterior, which is fine.

Just because you're there interior-wise doesn't mean u have to do the exterior

If I'm wrong, go for it and re-read the other posts...they're good and do more research.

I don't specialize in exteriors and PT folks have helped alot in regards to the exterior I've done.

Over my career of self employment that is in its later stages, I have taken projects what I thought were 60/40, 50/50, profit versus learning curve....cuz I want to know what it's really like and ended up less than those percentages. I still do this, but less.

I guess my point is listen to your gut. If you want try a different paint project and expect to make the same profit as interiors, you won't...but you choose it because you can afford it while broadening your skill set.

Cheers
Your insights are interesting, I'm not intentionally going after the exterior work as you noted because interior painting is my comfort zone. This seemed like a small project so my thought was go ahead and bid and see if it lands a job. On one hand I hate to say no I don't do exteriors and leave money on the table especially since I'm just getting into this as an owner(sole proprietor). My gut tells me to stay away from large projects until I've done enough smaller ones to feel better able to tackle bigger stuff.

It's good to hear an outsiders point of view....helps keep things in perspective.
 

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The painting business certainly has a wide variety of skill sets. Having knowledge in every area takes alot of time. I for instance have never done an epoxy floor and that would freak me out. Or structural steel where proper sandblasting methods are required. Although I've painted 100's of exterior houses, I choose now to only do interior for my own reasons. I have however been a self taught carpenter over the last several years. Sometimes you have to learn on the fly.
 
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