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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I've just started my own residential painting business (ThePaintExpress - working on the webpage now...) and although I'm comfortable with interior painting the only exterior work I've ever done was my own home. I went out to do a bid last weekend on the interior of this cottage and the owner asked for an exterior bid as well. I'll sum it up but there's one picture that may help and I've attached it for reference.

The siding is a compressed wood (hardboard?) with embossing and it's in good condition but the previous paint job is a really smooth sheen. I'm not sure if I need to sand the entire exterior or just use something like Krud Kutter (gloss off) to surface prep it. Also, the nail heads of which there are many are starting the rust. Whoever installed this stuff did NOT use galvanized nails unfortunately. So my thoughts are the entire exterior should be power washed, DE glossed, primed and then painted.

The hole in the picture is going to be repaired correctly by the carpenter doing the interior remodeling. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated....thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am not a fan of this type of siding. There are a few names for it, but in the end it’s just a fancy chip board (OSB) with exterior glue. If it’s hardboard Masonite-type siding, it’s treated the same way: use solid stain. It weathers poorly in areas of water exposure, predictably, such as water shed areas from roofs, and etc… it is important to make sure that the boards nearest the ground are monitored and kept in good condition, as rain and snow tend to cause these boards to fail first.

Latex solid stain is common maintenance for this type of siding if it has not been painted already (to treat it the same as Cedar in this regard). Can stain directly onto surface as is, but soft wash 1-2 weeks before painting work is recommended. Re-stain every 7-10 years. Builders sometimes spot prime nail heads at time of install, but if they are rusting it might be simplest to price a coat to prime entire siding using an oil based primer tinted t color, and then top coat with latex solid stain. Caulk with paintable caulk. Good luck with your business. I am located in Wisconsin too,so I deal with the same regional weather conditions as you. Is that Lake Michigan, or another lake?
That is a small lake in central Wisconsin called Wood Lake - it's between Westfield and Coloma.

I appreciate all the responses, with almost zero experience doing exteriors for customers this is extremely helpful. I'm likely going to bid this by adding in an oil based priming coat to ensure no issues down the road and follow the general advice of a soft wash a week or two out if I get hired for the job.

Thank you to all that replied
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Sorry bro...but maybe pass on exterior part for now...and congrats on doing the work for web presence.

I read and re-read your post and it doesn't seem like u want to do exterior, which is fine.

Just because you're there interior-wise doesn't mean u have to do the exterior

If I'm wrong, go for it and re-read the other posts...they're good and do more research.

I don't specialize in exteriors and PT folks have helped alot in regards to the exterior I've done.

Over my career of self employment that is in its later stages, I have taken projects what I thought were 60/40, 50/50, profit versus learning curve....cuz I want to know what it's really like and ended up less than those percentages. I still do this, but less.

I guess my point is listen to your gut. If you want try a different paint project and expect to make the same profit as interiors, you won't...but you choose it because you can afford it while broadening your skill set.

Cheers
Your insights are interesting, I'm not intentionally going after the exterior work as you noted because interior painting is my comfort zone. This seemed like a small project so my thought was go ahead and bid and see if it lands a job. On one hand I hate to say no I don't do exteriors and leave money on the table especially since I'm just getting into this as an owner(sole proprietor). My gut tells me to stay away from large projects until I've done enough smaller ones to feel better able to tackle bigger stuff.

It's good to hear an outsiders point of view....helps keep things in perspective.
 
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