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Guess I was thinking along the lines of a brad nailer. Going to be using this pretty much mainly for baseboard trim and window/door trim installations. For that purpose, I think a 16 guage brad nailer would be a good choice over an 18 gauge. Thoughts?

Did some checking around at big O and found a 6 gal. Porter Cable pancake compressor for $99 (150PSI). Also had a little Senco 1 gal. (120PSI) for $199 and although I know it would handle the brad nailers I am looking at, not sure that it would be big enough and give me enough flexability to possibly use it for other things.

Porter Cable also had a deal with that 6 gal. compressor and three nailers for $199; a 16 guage, 18 guage, and stapler. Not too keen on that package since the Porter Cable 16 guage brad nailer that I was looking was around $120 by itself. Guess i would need to check model numbers first tom see if they were offerring the same units that are sold as stand alones or if these are a set of cheaper models just built for this package deal.

Any ideas on suggested compressor sizes would also be appreciated.

This is my gun to a knife fight.




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The mini Senco compressor is nice for what you're talking about doing. You don't want to be humping around a big one to nail up a little bit of baseboard.

If that is all you need to do, grab a cordless. I have two Paslode cordless framing guns, and I used to have a 16g finish gun that walked off. I've never had any big problems, but they can be finicky in cold weather.

The battery ones get some good reviews, but I don't own one, so I couldn't speak for them. I moved all cordless to Makita brushless from Dewalt 18v nicad, and from what I hear, the Makita cordless nailers suck. I didn't plan that far ahead when I made the jump and it's a big investment to change all cordless platforms, so I'm pretty stuck for a while.
 

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I am full time builder/remodel and I have everything under the sun. I have tried every tool, from every brand. My best suggestion for what you are talking about doing would be the dewalt cordless 16 gauge. IMO 16 gauge is a great all around size nail. 18 is really to small for proper hold in door and window trim, and 15 can be over kill. We have 3 of these guns, and have had zero problems. Cordless is the future, get on it now if you are looking for new tools
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I am full time builder/remodel and I have everything under the sun. I have tried every tool, from every brand. My best suggestion for what you are talking about doing would be the dewalt cordless 16 gauge. IMO 16 gauge is a great all around size nail. 18 is really to small for proper hold in door and window trim, and 15 can be over kill. We have 3 of these guns, and have had zero problems. Cordless is the future, get on it now if you are looking for new tools
Thanks for the feedback on the guage of the brads.
 

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Pretty much all I would want the gun for is reattaching baseboards. So I guess a brad nailer is what I would be interested in getting.
Why not look into the cordless brad nailers. Ryobi AirStrike comes to mind. Plus you can use the batteries elsewhere (radios, drills, lights, etc.).

I have a couple Ryobi units and they work fine, especially if your trying to re-attach and call it good. Better than lugging a compressor around, pancake or not.

Ryobi use to sell a combo kit. Get a compressor, nailer, and stapler as a combo pack for a good price. Think I picked mine up for $175 or so, was a sale item. Wasn't looking to..but the price was too good to pass on, so I picked it up. Actually has come in pretty handy lol.


23G pinners don't have enough hold power for baseboard. In a pinch they probably would work, but I wouldn't count on them, especially if it was a lot that needed to be attached/re-attached.

Air driven always beats corded. They are more reliable, have less complex parts, generally tend to be lighter and smaller (as they don't need a battery pack attached), and they have power behind them when it comes to air.

But just like any tool..the job dictates what tool you use. I personally would rather carry a battery operated unit for quick fixes than the air setup.
 

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I also vote for the Paslode. I find they really come in handy for exterior wood replacement, but it's nice not being tethered to a air line inside as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
So, ended up going with a Senco 18 guage gun. Remodeling contractor I work with occasionally said that the 18 guage would be fine for almost any trim work and the Senco guns get good reviews.

Also went with a Senco compressor; 1.5 hp /2.5 gal twin tank unit. Powerful enough to do the jobs I need doing, good recovery time, and not too heavy. A little spendy for the size but has quality features that make it worth a little extra money IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Also, thanks to all of you who chipped in with suggestions. Much appreciated.
 

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So, ended up going with a Senco 18 guage gun. Remodeling contractor I work with occasionally said that the 18 guage would be fine for almost any trim work and the Senco guns get good reviews.

Also went with a Senco compressor; 1.5 hp /2.5 gal twin tank unit. Powerful enough to do the jobs I need doing, good recovery time, and not too heavy. A little spendy for the size but has quality features that make it worth a little extra money IMO.
Good choice. Unless we're hanging HardiPlank/Panel, that gun easily handles 80% of the tasks for which we grab a nailer.
 
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Discussion Starter #35
Good choice. Unless we're hanging HardiPlank/Panel, that gun easily handles 80% of the tasks for which we grab a nailer.
Thanks! I figure that I can always pick up a 16 guage down the line should I ever need one. But for now the 18 should be more than adequate.
 

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Thanks! I figure that I can always pick up a 16 guage down the line should I ever need one. But for now the 18 should be more than adequate.
Just let me know, I'll send you mine. We use that one so rarely that I forget we have it.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Eventually plan on replacing our hollow core doors with solid slabs and the 16g is likely better for setting casings. Maybe then. :biggrin:
 

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Eventually plan on replacing our hollow core doors with solid slabs and the 16g is likely better for setting casings. Maybe then. :biggrin:
Now you're talkin' like a spec builder, the kind who uses the casings to hold the door frames in the openings.
 

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Now you're talkin' like a spec builder, the kind who uses the casings to hold the door frames in the openings.


Lol. I know a "carpenter" who does that. Even exterior doors. Solid core & metal.


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