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I have a new fiberglass door that needs stain. I hear gel stain is the way to go. Any tips or methods would be helpful. Also, some fiber-doors I see are either maple in color or an opaque color. Tools or techniques would be greatly appreciated! :eek:
 

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painttofish,I actually just did a search here a day ago to find some tips on this,did'nt find any.I have done a few stained fiberglass doors and gel stain is what I used.Most people seem to think they have turned out good but being my own best critic I am not satisfied.What I do is put a little linseed oil in the stain,use a good brush and brush on as dry as possible.How I do this is slightly dip the brush tap it off as usual then dab it on a rag then your ready to apply stain to door.these have been some quality doors I've done so the factory finish is non porous and the stain spreads easily but if you run into a door that wants to grab the stain you'll want to paint it with eggshell first.I forgot to add stain in sections and keep on moving.The brush I use is a wooster platinum.But like stated earlier I am still looking to improve mine so If anyone has any other method paintofish and I need to hear it.
 

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Thanks nogg. Just wondering if linseed oil is necessary? Also if the door is porous and I am going to stain it, you recommend painting it with eggshell? Is that better than sanding sealer or poly? I have herd dry brushing is the best way to do it. Thanks. Anyone else got 2 cents...
 

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Be careful with your warranty, UV rays and heat build up can make the finish look bad within a year. If the door is protected by a full glass storm door the area between the doors is like an oven and it can bake the finish. If the sun hits the whole door or parts of the door the fading or flaking of the finish looks bad.
 

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We had paint blister off thermal type fiberglass entry doors on the sunny side of the street. Prep was good, primer, and product... on wood doors.

The quality of insulation value within the door created a heatwave on the surface that you could EASILY feel with your hand in only warm weather.

In summer, you did NOT want to hold your hand near the doors.

Don't forget, 130 degrees, you're stripping paint!
r
 

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Often the gel stain colors are not close enough to the color i need to match to existing woodwork and trim.
i use a solid color stain because it is much easier to adjust the color.
I bring a piece of 'skin' from the supplier and they color match to a piece of trim i bring to S-W.
I know nothing about primers or using eggshell in regards to staining a fiberglass door...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Often the gel stain colors are not close enough to the color i need to match to existing woodwork and trim.
i use a solid color stain because it is much easier to adjust the color.
I bring a piece of 'skin' from the supplier and they color match to a piece of trim i bring to S-W.
I know nothing about primers or using eggshell in regards to staining a fiberglass door...
Do you stain the door as it were wood or do you use a different technique?
 

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I have a new fiberglass door that needs stain. I hear gel stain is the way to go. Any tips or methods would be helpful. Also, some fiber-doors I see are either maple in color or an opaque color. Tools or techniques would be greatly appreciated! :eek:
OK, since no one has answered your question yet I'll take a stab at it.
First of all, remove the door from its frame and lay flat on saw horses. Remove all hardware and weatherstripping from door and frame. Clean door with mineral spriits and a clean rag. Tape off glass if applicable. Sand and prime frame with 123 tinted to the base color of the door. Test for stain color (I have about 16 different colors of gel stain that I keep on hand that can be intermixed if necesary for the proper color, I prefer Old Masters gel stains). Apply stain to small area of the door at a time with a bristle brush, then with a dry brush start to remove some of the stain. It helps to hold the brush flat against the door at first. Remove excess stain from brush by blotting on a rag. Continue removing stain until it is uniform in appearance and move on to the next area. Use the same process on the frame. Allow to dry thoroughly and apply 2 coats of polyurethane for interior or 2 coats of spar marine for exterior (I always recommend that exteriors be painted rather than stained for better durability).

Here is a picture of one that I did a year ago. I'm presently in the process of doing some others and if I can remember I'll try to get some pictures of them as well.
 

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Thanks rabbit, Door looks great! Are you tinting the 123 to the base of the factory door color, or to the color of the stain? Can you explain the necessity of priming the door.;)
It is NOT necesary to prime the door first to stain it. I tint the 123 to the factory color of the door but I only use it on the door frame because the factory primer on the frame is not only the wrong color (white) but it is junk.
 

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Gel stain works great. I've found it helps me to tape off each section as i do the door. For example I'll tape off around all pannels directly at the edge of the flats. Then pull tape and do the same with the horizontals then the verticals. Things dry pretty quickly here so you can two coat right away. Then come back with 2 coats of minwax hellmsman. The tape gives you nice sharp lines. you don't want to get the stain where your not ready to work it. It will lap real bad
 

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First time staining fiberglass door - gel stain still tacky after 14 hours

It's the first time for putting gel stain on the interior of a new fiberglass front door. Application took a little getting used to, but figured it out pretty quickly and it looks pretty good -- in color and stroke.

Problem is this. It's been over 14 hours and the stain is still not dry. Still very tacky.

It's not been put on that heavily. Temperatures have been between 60 and 75 degrees, and the humidity has been low.

Any guidance would be most appreciated.
 

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Good advice by jack and aaron. Jack's door looks exemplary, like it should.

I've used gel stain, and as far as I'm concerned, it should be called gel "glaze" because it's not really soaking into anything. FYI, if your final color is not dark enough, you can add more gel stain to your subsequent poly coats to acheive your desired color.

mebinohio: I had this similar problem- the surface was just slightly tacky for me. I applied poly the next day anyway, and it dried down very well- no tacky feeling.
 

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It's the first time for putting gel stain on the interior of a new fiberglass front door. Application took a little getting used to, but figured it out pretty quickly and it looks pretty good -- in color and stroke.

Problem is this. It's been over 14 hours and the stain is still not dry. Still very tacky.

It's not been put on that heavily. Temperatures have been between 60 and 75 degrees, and the humidity has been low.

Any guidance would be most appreciated.

Wait for it to dry. It's going to be slower drying because it can't soak in, it has to dry naturally. More than 24 hours, or even 48 wouldn't be unusual.
 
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