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Haha. All good. Under that window was probably one of the last pieces and had to be overlapped to match the pattern. I'm pretty sure I was at the end of my patience by this time. I was so focused on keeping the pattern "in tact", that keeping it level under that window never even crossed my mind. It was however very level across the ceiling line and the rest of the wainscot. So cut me a little slack! 馃槄 馃檹. I am glad you pointed that out though.
That's a pain. So you can start on one wall, and by the time you circle around the room, the pattern is off? It doesn't seem like there is actually a way to make that work, if the walls/room aren't perfectly square.
 

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I'll chime in again. Yes, that is unacceptable, but sometimes, its unavoidable. If there wasnt enough paper to properly do it, for example. Just today, I had a problem because the corners were out of whack. All I could do, is overlap the paper at eye level and make it look good there, but above and below, the pattern went out.. If the room is out of whack, we can only do what we can do... But yes, that could have been done way better, but hes asking for our help, just like I used to do.

Yeah, he asked what would you do. It wasn鈥檛 clear to me from the first post that he already did the job. I thought he was trying to gain info based on the original job to not repeat the first guy鈥檚 errors. My bad.

Honestly, don鈥檛 you guys check those areas to see if it鈥檚 going to present a problem? If not, why? I realize it鈥檚 different from stenciling entire walls but, how do you determine what wall to start on? For us it was always about site lines. What area might be in your site line from entering the room? Or sitting on the toilet?

If there鈥檚 not enough paper to properly do the job, why ruin more paper? Wouldn鈥檛 that become something you alert the homeowner about?

I know it might not seem so but my comment was intended to be helpful. Unhappy customers are not good for business.
 

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You want to paper a bathroom with a geometric pattern. What are the odds that:
1) The ceiling is level all the way around.
2) The tile is level all the way around.
3) The corners are plumb.
4) The window ledge is parallel to the tile.
5) The pattern itself is perfectly aligned on the paper.
Answer: The odds are zero. You're the paperhanger, make it look perfect......
 

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Yeah, he asked what would you do. It wasn鈥檛 clear to me from the first post that he already did the job. I thought he was trying to gain info based on the original job to not repeat the first guy鈥檚 errors. My bad.

Honestly, don鈥檛 you guys check those areas to see if it鈥檚 going to present a problem? If not, why? I realize it鈥檚 different from stenciling entire walls but, how do you determine what wall to start on? For us it was always about site lines. What area might be in your site line from entering the room? Or sitting on the toilet?

If there鈥檚 not enough paper to properly do the job, why ruin more paper? Wouldn鈥檛 that become something you alert the homeowner about?

I know it might not seem so but my comment was intended to be helpful. Unhappy customers are not good for business.
Sometimes people call and want an installation and have already bought the paper, and are a little on the short side... You cant just go to the store and get more paper. Also, with somethign like a mural, thats just not gonna work. The best thing to do there, is to not split the sheet, get it into he corner, then cut one side of the corner, so it minimizes pattern loss.

It also depends on the paper. Some patterns HAVE to be plumb, even if the walls and ceiling arent. If we cock it to try to match the off plumb corners, then when artwork is hung, it will look like its crooked. And we also cant think of everything. Sometimes we get caught up just trying to make the ceiling look right, that we miss that the corners are out. Theres a LOT of variables, and its easy to overlook something due to being focused on something else, then we finish up, and see where we screwed up, and then its too late...

With this particular pattern, it repeats horizontally, so it could have easily been slid over to the next pattern to overlap the corner the best way possible, so yeah, thats a rookie mistake. Learn from it. Then do a combination of creative cutting, and markers to blend in anything that doesnt quite match right. Its really time consuming. Another thing todo is pick the most visible corner and start the paper there. If your paper were overlapped you can cut out tiny notches on the top layer to expose the color beneath, so it at least doesnt look like a sharp cut off. Get creative. Do this with your kill point too. I've even cut pieces out of a scrap, and glued it on top of the paper to make it look right.

Some advanced techniques involve widening or narrowing the pattern with creative cutting to make the pattern land in the corner in a better spot. If it was being hung left to right, over the door would be a great place to do this. IT can be done on a full wall though, but its tedious. If one were hanging vertical stripes, and you have a stripe in a corner thats off by a 1/2" in the corner, you can double cut the strip in one or more places where that 1/2" is either spread out to several stripes that are 1/8" a piece or whatever will not show as much. I'll see if I can download some pics of some tricky stuff I've done.
 

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Here is a room I got REALLY creative with. I widened and narrowed stripes all over the place to make everything land in good spots. and make the stripes meet each other on the other side of the room See if you can spot where I did it, besides the obvious diagonal parts. This was actually pretty fun making everything line up in a good way. It was like a puzzle. Log in to Facebook
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here is an example of a very bad out of whack corner situation with pattern that showed it really bad. Some places I creatively cut into the overlaps, and some places, I cut out fish bodies out of scraps and glued them onto the paper. It doesnt look great, but it looks WAY better than what it would have been with headless or tailless fish.
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Hers a minor "tent" effect I did on a ceiling. It was no accident that both sides landed the way they did. I did the diagonals on one side, and went out a little ways, then I went to the other side, and did the same, Where there was about 6 feet in the middle, I cut some guide strips to see how they would meet up. I had to overlap three or four pieces and widened a few of the light colored stripes about 1/2" You have to look REALLY hard to see them. Log into Facebook
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Heres a 'queen of spain' I did in a powder room. This stuff is 52" wide, so overlapping two strips in the corner is out of the question. I dont quite remember how I got this corner. I think I just had to measure it absolutely perfect, and got lucky with the straightness of the corner. If there were any wierd cut off spots, I would probably have cut out some tear drops from a scrap and glued them to the paper. The black version of this is a lot easier, as you can use a marker to to round out any cut offs a little
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This one, I believe I just got incredibly lucky with and everything landed perfectly. If it didnt, I would have cut an even amount off of two strips in a corner to cut an even amount off both sides so they line up in the corner. If needed I could have trimmed an equal amount off the butt sides of the strips to shrink the pattern a touch to make it fit better
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This one, I balanced the pattern so all four walls had equal corners, and the pattern was centered on each one, so I did the back wall first, then when I got to the left corner, I had about 2"overlapping. I did my best to cut an equal amount off the strip on the next wall so the pattern is essentially mirrored, and cut off equally on both walls Of course it wasnt perfect, so I used a black sharpy to fill some white to make all the little white arrowhead looking things mirror each other. I also could have cut matching pieces and glued them to the paper as well, but I didnt want to spend the time.
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One more. This ones a video, so hopefully the link works. Its a damask pattern in an entryway. The patterns fit perfectly in the two narrow walls, so I made each corner perfect, and met them in the middle about the door, and archway, and creatively spliced them together up high. It took a long time to pull this off right, but I think it was worth the effort, as it looks a lot better to have the corners perfect. See if you can spot where I joined them. The part over the door is a little more obvious, but the part over the arch, you can barely tell.

EDIT...I cant post the video, but I'll leave the story here to give an idea of what to do in a situation like that.
 

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Also, heres the post I made about a horrible looking corner. The paper was already ordered, when I got the job, so I didnt have enough to overlap two strips. It still would have looked bad, but I could have at least made it match at eye level. Is there any way to avoid this?

straight Diagonal geometrics in corners are the WORST.
 

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Wow. Super impressive Woodco. I can hardly wrap my head around how you did the diagonal ceiling stripes to match up. That rounded wall looks super cool also. I assume paper goes on a curved wall no problem? Or does it wrinkle? Yes, there are soo many things to consider and think about when doing a room that it spins your head in circles. Like I said, I only do a few hangs per year so have slowly been learning over the years and every paper is different which makes it like learning all over again each time you do it. It funny how you can be so focused on one concern and then totally blow something so obvious like my under the window conundrum. You actually would't notice that sitting on the toilet and in fact didn't notice until that picture was taken.. Thanks for all the tips guys.
 

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Excellent work @Woodco !! I imagine that ceiling was fun to hang!

@finishesbykevyn- i thought your work looked good. I鈥檓 not sure I would minded (or noticed) the slight discrepancy near the window.

I don鈥檛 know how to hang paper, can appreciate a skill I don鈥檛 have.
 

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Wow. Super impressive Woodco. I can hardly wrap my head around how you did the diagonal ceiling stripes to match up. That rounded wall looks super cool also. I assume paper goes on a curved wall no problem? Or does it wrinkle? Yes, there are soo many things to consider and think about when doing a room that it spins your head in circles. Like I said, I only do a few hangs per year so have slowly been learning over the years and every paper is different which makes it like learning all over again each time you do it. It funny how you can be so focused on one concern and then totally blow something so obvious like my under the window conundrum. You actually would't notice that sitting on the toilet and in fact didn't notice until that picture was taken.. Thanks for all the tips guys.
Thanks. That curved wall didnt give a problem.
 

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here is an example of a very bad out of whack corner situation with pattern that showed it really bad. Some places I creatively cut into the overlaps, and some places, I cut out fish bodies out of scraps and glued them onto the paper. It doesnt look great, but it looks WAY better than what it would have been with headless or tailless fish. View attachment 112223
A trick I learned from Da Arch on here years ago is to de-laminate the pattern from the backing, making the overlay much thinner and less detectable.
 

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Here is a room I got REALLY creative with. I widened and narrowed stripes all over the place to make everything land in good spots. and make the stripes meet each other on the other side of the room See if you can spot where I did it, besides the obvious diagonal parts. This was actually pretty fun making everything line up in a good way. It was like a puzzle. Log in to Facebook View attachment 112229 View attachment 112230
My OCD is satisfied by how the paper lines up with the vent. 馃憤馃徎
 

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How I handled a kill point yesterday... I could have done much better, but I was in a time crunch... Clear elmers glue on the paper over paper, btw. Its up high, and the purpose is really to keep peoples eyes from drawing there.
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