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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, Everyone, I have a customer who is putting Cypress wood on int. walls, its new, so it looks almost like pine, but she wants to have it turn gray, also she wants a satin or semi-gloss finish. She has seen in a magazine some '' pecky cypress'' that's gray, but this wood is not. I really don't no what to do to turn it a weathered gray, unless I stain it 1st then seal it. the wood does have some rough/ splintered areas. I didn't know if anyone has run into this, and used some chemical mix to make it age faster. any ideas are greatly appreciated.
maybe I ought to try mixing up some light stain, really thinned out.

Thanks.
 

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Does iron acetate react with it? We don't see much cypress around here. Orange Doug fir I use a mixture two steel wool pads (Washed in lacquer thinner and dried) to one gallon 5% vinegar and reduce 10:1 -20:1 for a weathered gray on rough fir beams. Excellent on alder too. Pine needs treatment with tannic acid to produce a gray effect.
 

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Interior/Exterior Painting. Wall Paper. Residential/Commercial
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Had this type of situation on a past job. They wanted "barn wood" on the walls of the rec room. Had ceder to work with. Tried steel wool in vinegar wash, made it look aged but not like barn wood. Doing a few experiments I ended up using a propane torch to lightly char the surface of the cedar, then used a semi transparent gray stain and a satin clear for a finish. Not rough like barn wood, but has the look. I recommend getting a few pieces of Cypress and experimenting
 

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Had this type of situation on a past job. They wanted "barn wood" on the walls of the rec room. Had ceder to work with. Tried steel wool in vinegar wash, made it look aged but not like barn wood. Doing a few experiments I ended up using a propane torch to lightly char the surface of the cedar, then used a semi transparent gray stain and a satin clear for a finish. Not rough like barn wood, but has the look. I recommend getting a few pieces of Cypress and experimenting
Sometimes the job won't allow for a torch, in this case a similar effect can be achieved using a combination of stains, sanding the soft grain off, and a dye stain after and possibly a wash/glaze after
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't know if the cypress reacts with iron, I did come across a mixture of steel wool & teabags, & thin vinegar, I'm going to experiment with some sample boards, its quite a large area, 2 full floors. Thanks for the info, hopefully i can do the boards before they go up. I'll send some pics, if all goes well.
Thanks Again
 

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Vertical grain cypress colored with reactive black 31 & TiO2 dissolved in H2O w/a touch of acrylic resin to bind it.

Image.jpeg
 

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General finishes pewter dye will produce a similar looking result, fyi. Iron acetate on alder looks exactly like that too
I’ve never had much success in achieving a non-contrived silver-gray weathered look w/cypress, whether using dyes similar to the GF mentioned, iron acetate or ferrous sulfate after pre-treating w/tannic acid, and/or bleaching w/H2O2 & lye, followed by adding color back in w/either dyes and/or stains, including silver-gray metal complex dyes by WD Lockwood.

I was hired as a finishing consultant for the project in the following article to achieve a weathered gray look on new cypress installations, yet after countless failed sampling attempts, the design team as per my recommendations opted to use sinker cypress instead, specifying that mostly gray boards be used.

I’d be interested in hearing how the OP made out..

Prized Sinker Cypress Plays A Starring Role In A Bayfront Florida Home
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I never heard of pewter dye, or the other products mention, I did do some samples of different stains, thinned out with thinner, one doesn't look to bad. I wish the owner would get the cypress she wants, but I guess its a budget issue too. Either way its going to be a tremendous amount of work, staining & sealer.
Would yo be able to get a dye or something at a crafts store ? I'm in the north east.
 

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I’ve never had much success in achieving a non-contrived silver-gray weathered look w/cypress, whether using dyes similar to the GF mentioned, iron acetate or ferrous sulfate after pre-treating w/tannic acid, and/or bleaching w/H2O2 & lye, followed by adding color back in w/either dyes and/or stains, including silver-gray metal complex dyes by WD Lockwood.

I was hired as a finishing consultant for the project in the following article to achieve a weathered gray look on new cypress installations, yet after countless failed sampling attempts, the design team as per my recommendations opted to use sinker cypress instead, specifying that mostly gray boards be used.

I’d be interested in hearing how the OP made out..

Prized Sinker Cypress Plays A Starring Role In A Bayfront Florida Home
A little different architecture up here I imagine being that I've never even seen cypress used on a job however 'reclaimed' lumber yards as far as the eye can see. reminds me a recent job where the HO's decided they didn't care for caliclo hickory on their ceiling and decided to throw away an entire pallet of wood after we politely declined to selectively bleach it. Sinker cypress looks beautiful wow, great choice for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all the info, i never really seen cypress either, except on the old beach houses up here. Builder told me if she didn't like the cypress, they were going to pine, And there is so much of it up here.
 

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Varathane sells an "weathered wood accelerator" and Rust-Oleum sells "aged wood accelerator". I've seen reviews of the Varathane online. They claim it reacts with the tanins in the wood, but it looks like gray stain to me. Fence lumber is often stored outdoors and is usually cheaper than buying the lumber. You do have to take the fence apart so that is extra labor. But it might look aged to some degree.

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Update on this Subject, the Owner went with 3 coats of latex urethane, no stain just clear, I was surprised !

Thanks for everyone help with this topic. Much appreciated !
 
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