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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Who knew? Client wanted ‘distressed’ look, but ended up a cleaner look.

Before:

Room Countertop Cabinetry Property Kitchen



Floor Tile Furniture Flooring Property
 

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Glazed cabinets never went completely out of style, it's a lot like clothes, keep something long enough, it's back in style. I've never liked the distressed look!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I’m not a big fan of a distressed look but, if done correctly in the right setting it can work.

I love knotty pine woodwork, but it does make me think of a little elf sitting at a workbench whittling a toy train.
 

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@fauxlynn I would imagine that applying a distressed finish is alot more work than just painting them.. more steps involved. AKA more expensive?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@fauxlynn I would imagine that applying a distressed finish is alot more work than just painting them.. more steps involved. AKA more expensive?
Well sure, adding a glaze on top is more steps and money than just painting.

But usually if I’m adding on to a cabinet it needs to be base coated first anyway.

I’m not understanding the point you’re trying to make.
 

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Not gunna lie I was scared to scroll to the “after” based on ur title (even if they did fall flat to me before) but THAT is what glazing SHOULD look like!

Straight glaze lines, muted & blended perfectly, with clean trim cuts. Perfection!

When I first read the title my mind flashed to the “european” style glaze that literally looks like someone took some mud from the yard, watered it down, and wiped it on with a rag all willy nilly.

Remember when VDB glaze was everything for cabinets of any base color?! The heavier the better they say... :0 hahaha
 

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Personally not having done a glaze finish before, I was trying to determine how much extra work was involved in this process compared to just painting a set of cabinets.. Which I do often.
Wasn't trying to make a point, rather gathering information for teqnique/quoting purposes.:biggrin:

Well sure, adding a glaze on top is more steps and money than just painting.

But usually if I’m adding on to a cabinet it needs to be base coated first anyway.

I’m not understanding the point you’re trying to make.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Personally not having done a glaze finish before, I was trying to determine how much extra work was involved in this process compared to just painting a set of cabinets.. Which I do often.
Wasn't trying to make a point, rather gathering information for teqnique/quoting purposes.:biggrin:
Oh. Well if I’d been able to tackle this without all the girlfriend and cleaning lady interruptions, no more than 3 partial days for me. Not sure what your time would be.

This was quoted with all the doors off and thought I was working on them on sawhorses in the garage. The handyman that painted them insisted on putting them back up because of the new hinges. Then I didn’t want to be responsible for putting them back up if the hinges were screwy, so they requested I work on them in place. You’d think that’d be easier, but it isn’t. Also for some reason they only wanted the exteriors done. If I had to do the other sides, add a day.
 

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My gawd now youve got me right confused. Haha. I'll just assume it's more work than just a solid colour..:wink:

Oh. Well if I’d been able to tackle this without all the girlfriend and cleaning lady interruptions, no more than 3 partial days for me. Not sure what your time would be.

This was quoted with all the doors off and thought I was working on them on sawhorses in the garage. The handyman that painted them insisted on putting them back up because of the new hinges. Then I didn’t want to be responsible for putting them back up if the hinges were screwy, so they requested I work on them in place. You’d think that’d be easier, but it isn’t. Also for some reason they only wanted the exteriors done. If I had to do the other sides, add a day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
......how much extra work was involved in this process compared to just painting a set of cabinets.. Which I do often.
..... rather gathering information for teqnique/quoting purposes.:biggrin:
.......I'll just assume it's more work than just a solid colour..:wink:
Let me try again. I wasn’t registering what you were getting at, sorry.

Determine base coat for surface. I rely on making samples. In this case, client already had this done prior to contacting me.

Determine glaze mixture through approved sample. I used Ben Moore water based glaze this time, using some paint and universal tints to get the ‘right’ color.
Tape off verticals or horizontals depending on the plan of attack.

Apply glaze. Use a brush, roller, sponge , whatever. Pan out the glaze with brush. Take a wadded up cotton rag and wipe most of glaze off, depending on sample.

Use a drier brush to lightly brush through wiped area to clean it up/soften.

Repeat.

Let dry.

Clear coat with varnish of your choice. I use Faux Effects Varnish Plus Dull. It’s rated for kitchens.

Anyway. That’s it. I know I usually give a play by play in my posts, but this didn’t seem that interesting to me.
 

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Personally not having done a glaze finish before, I was trying to determine how much extra work was involved in this process compared to just painting a set of cabinets.. Which I do often.

Wasn't trying to make a point, rather gathering information for teqnique/quoting purposes.:biggrin:


Ya glazing will always increase the price. More steps= more money ;) but as lynn pointed out, it can be hard to quote unless they know exactly what look they’re after & can show examples. “i want a glazed finish” can mean anything (even if clients don’t think it does). I’ve never done a job without completing sample boards first.


Its not a hard skill to learn, but it can be difficult to master unless your already skilled at material dry times. Oil based is easiest to learn but will yellow a light base, water based dries quickly & each one is different. I favor faux effects but modern masters is good too (tacks quicker tho).
 

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cabs looks good, I haven't had a customer choose a decorative glaze, alongside gray type wall color..and yes, fewer are choosing a glaze or distress, when they do it's usually with a more traditional styled home..
 
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