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High quotes

2159 Views 46 Replies 20 Participants Last post by  RH
A fellow painter quoted a job for $15,000 and finished the job in a week and he is ok with that. I gave him a piece of my mind.
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What type of job? That's why I always tell prospective clients to get multiple bids.
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just painting a commercial building for a town. they problably didn't realize it would only take a week
Both parties agreed to terms. What is the problem?
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the problem is that some one would charge that much for a weeks work. This isn't a crew. This is one guy.
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I had a great association with a construction company many years back. They had a relationship with a local bank that had multiple branches, and I provided paint and wallpaper services as they did remodel work to update all the branches. One day while working in one of the offices of a branch I happened to see the invoice for some work that I had done as an add on. My price for the work was $3500. The invoice from the construction company was $8500.
Lesson learned......The job is worth what the company will pay.
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It's better than under bidding. I have more under-bids than over-bids over the course of my career. I remember both and have to say, it's fun to get paid like a lawyer or a surgeon sometimes.
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the problem is that some one would charge that much for a weeks work. This isn't a crew. This is one guy.
I still don't understand your problem, (unless it's envy), I often over bid jobs I don't want to do! I try to price myself out of the running BUT if they sign for an excessive amount, trust me, for that money, I'll be happy to take them to the cleaners while on a paint job. I'll be smiling through what ever they want to dish out.
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My eyebrows may have climbed up my face by an inch or two when hearing this but the bottom line is; good for him.
Assuming he did what he was contracted to do and he didn’t skimp on prep or materials, then making good coin is fine. Conning an unsuspecting little old lady out of a similar amount would be considered pretty low down on the ethics list but earning a decent pay check on a commercial job doesn’t strike me as anything particular egregious. And I certainly wouldn’t have said anything negative to a fellow painter who was sharing such info.
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Not to hijack the thread, but in the same vein, what's the most anyone's made on a job? Be it hourly or as a whole.

I have a job I'm just wrapping up where my employee did most of the work, and if I bill at the full rate I'll get $2,200 for roughly 6 hours of work. I was planning on cutting the rate as I'm a little uncomfortable charging this much, but this thread is making me reconsider. I've been chided (maybe rightly so) on PT before for charging less than my estimate.

I tend to be paranoid about someone thinking I've ripped them off, while what I should be doing is remembering how many jobs I've underbid and taken it in the shorts. As thepm4 mentioned, there are usually more of those.
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One final thought: How do you know he was not yanking your chain and in point of fact he made really only made $1500. He might have been looking to set you off and if that was the case, he did a first rate job. As it happens, I never talk about the money with other painters. They charge what they think they are worth and I do the same. I will discuss technique, tools, tips, tricks and materials but their finances are between them and the national revenue service.
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Not to hijack the thread, but in the same vein, what's the most anyone's made on a job? Be it hourly or as a whole.

I have a job I'm just wrapping up where my employee did most of the work, and if I bill at the full rate I'll get $2,200 for roughly 6 hours of work. I was planning on cutting the rate as I'm a little uncomfortable charging this much, but this thread is making me reconsider. I've been chided (maybe rightly so) on PT before for charging less than my estimate.

I tend to be paranoid about someone thinking I've ripped them off, while what I should be doing is remembering how many jobs I've underbid and taken it in the shorts. As thepm4 mentioned, there are usually more of those.
If they signed the contract and you did what you promised to do you have nothing to fear. $366 per man hour is pretty sweet pay! I doubt you could get away with that kind of pricing very often and remain a viable company.
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If they signed the contract and you did what you promised to do you have nothing to fear. $366 per man hour is pretty sweet pay! I doubt you could get away with that kind of pricing very often and remain a viable company.
Yes I doubt so too! It was one of the few jobs I didn't look at before bidding. Ended up being a lot less work than I thought.
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Yes I doubt so too! It was one of the few jobs I didn't look at before bidding. Ended up being a lot less work than I thought.
Makes a body wonder what other companies bid! You could not have been the cheapest but I wonder what their lowest bid was. When one thinks about it, they gave you the contract, there was a reason they chose you. Reputation? Referral? Price? Confidence? What ever their resoning, they gave the contract to you with no request for changes or considerations of any kind. Buy youself a beer, put you feet up and relax. We don't often get such windfalls and when they do happen, take it as your due!
Not to hijack the thread, but in the same vein, what's the most anyone's made on a job? Be it hourly or as a whole.

I have a job I'm just wrapping up where my employee did most of the work, and if I bill at the full rate I'll get $2,200 for roughly 6 hours of work. I was planning on cutting the rate as I'm a little uncomfortable charging this much, but this thread is making me reconsider. I've been chided (maybe rightly so) on PT before for charging less than my estimate.

I tend to be paranoid about someone thinking I've ripped them off, while what I should be doing is remembering how many jobs I've underbid and taken it in the shorts. As thepm4 mentioned, there are usually more of those.
If I totally kill A project I will occasionally credit them something. This is with homeowners only, contractors not much. Homeowners tend to remember these things, which helps down the road in terms of word of mouth references, and repeat work.
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Not to hijack the thread, but in the same vein, what's the most anyone's made on a job? Be it hourly or as a whole.

I have a job I'm just wrapping up where my employee did most of the work, and if I bill at the full rate I'll get $2,200 for roughly 6 hours of work. I was planning on cutting the rate as I'm a little uncomfortable charging this much, but this thread is making me reconsider. I've been chided (maybe rightly so) on PT before for charging less than my estimate.

I tend to be paranoid about someone thinking I've ripped them off, while what I should be doing is remembering how many jobs I've underbid and taken it in the shorts. As thepm4 mentioned, there are usually more of those.
If I do an estimate and the scope of work changes I will try to be fair, good for business. On the other hand, if it is a contract and I fulfilled the terms I put the money in the bank. A lot of time and effort goes on that never can be billed for, so I try not to look at money on a per job basis. Take the good because you have to take the bad as well.
Not to hijack the thread, but in the same vein, what's the most anyone's made on a job? Be it hourly or as a whole.

I have a job I'm just wrapping up where my employee did most of the work, and if I bill at the full rate I'll get $2,200 for roughly 6 hours of work. I was planning on cutting the rate as I'm a little uncomfortable charging this much, but this thread is making me reconsider. I've been chided (maybe rightly so) on PT before for charging less than my estimate.

I tend to be paranoid about someone thinking I've ripped them off, while what I should be doing is remembering how many jobs I've underbid and taken it in the shorts. As thepm4 mentioned, there are usually more of those.
The dude I was working with was going to bid a job at $34k that no one else wanted so I told him to double that for his troubles to drive up the mountain in the middle of winter. So 64k for two weeks and they didn't bat an eye
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If I do an estimate and the scope of work changes I will try to be fair, good for business. On the other hand, if it is a contract and I fulfilled the terms I put the money in the bank. A lot of time and effort goes on that never can be billed for, so I try not to look at money on a per job basis. Take the good because you have to take the bad as well.
I like that idea of trying not to look at money on a per job basis. I'd never thought of it from that particular angle.
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The dude I was working with was going to bid a job at $34k that no one else wanted so I told him to double that for his troubles to drive up the mountain in the middle of winter. So 64k for two weeks and they didn't bat an eye
Holy smokes that's a nice little payday!
Makes a body wonder what other companies bid! You could not have been the cheapest but I wonder what their lowest bid was. When one thinks about it, they gave you the contract, there was a reason they chose you. Reputation? Referral? Price? Confidence? What ever their resoning, they gave the contract to you with no request for changes or considerations of any kind. Buy youself a beer, put you feet up and relax. We don't often get such windfalls and when they do happen, take it as your due!
Thanks Jennifer, I like the sound of that! Yeah I didn't think it was too out of line, but when I got to the job I realized there was a lot less trim on the house than normal (no window wraps).
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