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Discussion Starter #1
Been thinking this for a long time now, hot water cleans better so wouldn't hot water pressure washing be better for paint prep? Obviously being cautious of the current coating.
 

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Hot water cleaning better is really a marginal statement if you are using the right chems.
Agreed. Even less than marginal if cleaning decks.

Unless you plan on adding cleaning of concrete/flatwork the services you offer, I don't think a hot water washer is cost-effective for the typical painting contractor. For about a third of the cost, you could get something like this, which IMHO, we painters would get more mileage out of http://www.pressuretek.com/fatboybandit.html
 

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I appreciate all the input, I should give more info on what type of work I do, just trying to make a decision as I have to buy a trailer unit with reclaim system and hot water vs cold water isn't breaking the bank at this point the purchase period is :) I do mainly 90% commercial work most being efis, tilt up, or block. Still the same opinions?
 

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Been thinking this for a long time now, hot water cleans better so wouldn't hot water pressure washing be better for paint prep? Obviously being cautious of the current coating.
racx i've had a hot water pressure washer for 8+ years

the good ... retail stores sidewalks ... we've made our money back in the first year cleaning bubble gum & nasty stores fronts

also we do a lot of warehouses so for cleaning the floor it's great

and being not too many painters have a hot water machine our rig stands out

but if your doing residential repaints you won't find is cost effective, at least in Florida

plus the cost of operating ... Diesel Fuel for the heater, gas for motor, hot water hoses, hot water washer for fittings, trailer, ect add to cost

for me i've tried to reinvest in my company & grow so the money was well spent but for the average painter i don't think you'll need it

also hot water can do a lot of damage if you don't use it right
 

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I don't really have to add anything.. repaint summed it up well.

I am not a fan of using a pressure washer as paint prep. I think its purpose is to rinse off mold killing or rust removing chemicals and maybe getting rid of spider webs and insect nests. The finish itself is best left to old school scraping and sanding.

There are some commercial uses where hot water and high pressure can come in handy. Painted block or stripe removal from curbs or asphalt. In your shoes, i would look at how many jobs you have done where a HW pressure washer would have served you better. If its over 15 jobs, its probably worth the extra couple grand for a hot water unit. As an alternative, you can start with a cold water machine and add a hot box later.
 

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PaInTeR ExTrAoRdInAiRe
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racx i've had a hot water pressure washer for 8+ years

the good ... retail stores sidewalks ... we've made our money back in the first year cleaning bubble gum & nasty stores fronts

also we do a lot of warehouses so for cleaning the floor it's great

and being not too many painters have a hot water machine our rig stands out

but if your doing residential repaints you won't find is cost effective, at least in Florida

plus the cost of operating ... Diesel Fuel for the heater, gas for motor, hot water hoses, hot water washer for fittings, trailer, ect add to cost

for me i've tried to reinvest in my company & grow so the money was well spent but for the average painter i don't think you'll need it

also hot water can do a lot of damage if you don't use it right
I agree. I was speaking for myself. I don't think is worth the investment on residential.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I don't really have to add anything.. repaint summed it up well.

I am not a fan of using a pressure washer as paint prep. I think its purpose is to rinse off mold killing or rust removing chemicals and maybe getting rid of spider webs and insect nests. The finish itself is best left to old school scraping and sanding.

There are some commercial uses where hot water and high pressure can come in handy. Painted block or stripe removal from curbs or asphalt. In your shoes, i would look at how many jobs you have done where a HW pressure washer would have served you better. If its over 15 jobs, its probably worth the extra couple grand for a hot water unit. As an alternative, you can start with a cold water machine and add a hot box later.
I appreciate it Pressure Pros (and everyone else). I totally agree scraping and sanding is better prep but in retail specs and time frame pressure washing is what we have to do. I think I will go cold water the water reclaim setup is very expensive.
 

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I appreciate all the input, I should give more info on what type of work I do, just trying to make a decision as I have to buy a trailer unit with reclaim system and hot water vs cold water isn't breaking the bank at this point the purchase period is :) I do mainly 90% commercial work most being efis, tilt up, or block. Still the same opinions?
Ya, unless you're getting contracts for parking lots, parking structures, etc., or commercial flatwork, I still have the same opinion. If money is no object, I'd look at a 8gpm cold water with an Udor Pump, along with that Fatboy I linked to earlier, plus a good surface cleaner. Anything bigger than 24" can be cumbersome if using on smaller areas or residential imo. All those things together = my dream setup that's still about 2-3 yrs away.
 

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Ya, unless you're getting contracts for parking lots, parking structures, etc., or commercial flatwork, I still have the same opinion. If money is no object, I'd look at a 8gpm cold water with an Udor Pump, along with that Fatboy I linked to earlier, plus a good surface cleaner. Anything bigger than 24" can be cumbersome if using on smaller areas or residential imo. All those things together = my dream setup that's still about 2-3 yrs away.
my dream setup is no mortgage & a houseboat :)


.
 

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I don't really have to add anything.. repaint summed it up well.

I am not a fan of using a pressure washer as paint prep. I think its purpose is to rinse off mold killing or rust removing chemicals and maybe getting rid of spider webs and insect nests. The finish itself is best left to old school scraping and sanding.

There are some commercial uses where hot water and high pressure can come in handy. Painted block or stripe removal from curbs or asphalt. In your shoes, i would look at how many jobs you have done where a HW pressure washer would have served you better. If its over 15 jobs, its probably worth the extra couple grand for a hot water unit. As an alternative, you can start with a cold water machine and add a hot box later.
Just to be clear, that's what a competent painter does with a pressure washer...use it to clean the mold and mildew with the downstreaming of proper chemicals.

As far as removing loose, peeling paint with high pressure, that's a mistake in most applications.
 

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Just to be clear, that's what a competent painter does with a pressure washer...use it to clean the mold and mildew with the downstreaming of proper chemicals.



As far as removing loose, peeling paint with high pressure, that's a mistake in most applications.

Roger that.


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Just to be clear, that's what a competent painter does with a pressure washer...use it to clean the mold and mildew with the downstreaming of proper chemicals.

As far as removing loose, peeling paint with high pressure, that's a mistake in most applications.
We are in agreement there. Unfortunately, word hasn't trickled down from the forums to the streets (yet).
 

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Yep, like I mentioned above, painted block is an example of when using pressure is fine. A 4000 psi machine with the right turbo nozzle will rip that coating right off.
 
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