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However, they were out of all paint in that base. There wasn't a single can of paint to be had in a gallon in the needed base at that store, or any nearby stores.
That's really becoming a problem around here. Last house I finished I showed up to grab a bunch of paint and they had one single gallon of what I needed. Customer was heading to the city that day and grabbed what we needed, but they had to call several stores to find it. Never had this problem before.
 

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Looks great @Holland… love the color..I’m planning on doing my 1740 built home’s exterior, come early fall, in a similar/nearly identical color…everything from the roof line down except the entry door will be a dark monochromatic gray, similar to Paul Revere’s house..
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Looks great @Holland… love the color..I’m planning on doing my 1740 built home’s exterior, come early fall, in a similar/nearly identical color…everything from the roof line down except the entry door will be a dark monochromatic gray, similar to Paul Revere’s house..
Thanks!

post lots of pics.
Love seeing your work.
 

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Peel Bond is awesome product and you are right about the product.
The problem is, Ppl here in this forum are professionals and have their own way to eat yogurt :)
He is right and you are right.
I have been telling Bin and Advance is not a perfect candidate to finish cabinetry ,there are tons of better products as easy as spraying or painting like them since i joined this forum but who cares ?:)) their way is the right way and i quit talking or arguing.
Call it a day my friend.
Not trying to derail this thread. Great work Holland btw. I'm sure whatever work you did will last 10 times longer than whoever did it last.. I would have stained it also.. @Technogod, I'd like to see you spray finish old varnished oak cabinets with a tinted lacquer and see how that works out for you without back rolling your product into the grain. Like I've said before, every situation is different, like new cabinetry compared to repaints. MDF compared to Oak. No one is disputing that your doing a great job on your new cabinets. 👏 Love all your photos.
 

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@finishesbykevyn Thank You sir ! My customers are %110 percent happy and i am happy. The rest is really a individual choice.It is like arguing over water base or solvent base.
All about the job and requirements.Work determines the type of the materials and equipment.
No worries i am prepared for every kind of finishing scenario :) .
I do not have stain grade finishing job on the schedule but i will make a tutorial when i am free and document for you guys who want to benefit from a different perspective
 

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The only argument I would personally have against a Peel Bond type primer in that situation is Peel Bond or similar thick elastomeric primers still can and do eventually fail, and the way they peel is not graceful in the slightest, big giant peeling sheets. What do you do next, more Peel Bond over and over? Oil of course can and will eventually fail as well, but likely taking more time than an equivalent latex primer. When oil fails, though, the hardness of oil, and it being smaller alligatored pieces are a lot easier to sand and feather in again, and the new oil primer itself is sandable and to a small extent acts a bit like a skimcoat in providing a sandable new surface to work with. An elastomeric primer has no ability to be sanded or feathered out well. Oil would give you the best looking finish in that scenario compared to a Peel Bond type product.

There's plenty of situations where elastomeric is appropriate, but I think using a Peel Bond type product is essentially the end of the road on a house. Once you go to that option there's basically no turning back short of a full on strip, whereas oil and a normal solid stain or latex paint top coat gives you a normal maintenance cycle where you can do a fairly normal scrape, sand, prime, etc, type job, and not remediation of the old elastomeric coating in whatever amount of years it does take to eventually fail. There's plenty of situations where it is appropriate, and indeed on some houses there's no way you can reasonably get a long lasting job that looks even OK without a full strip down without using an elastomeric primer, and it's 100% appropriate there, especially if a budget is tight or you have environmental issues like lead or asbestos and can't disturb the surface much. (As we saw in another thread recently on here.)

That said, I think many homeowners would want the ability to just have normal basically maintenance level paint jobs done every so many years that cost less money and take less time to do, rather than cover everything with a Peel Bond style primer and have it potentially last longer but then down the road have much more of a mess to deal with.
 

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The only argument I would personally have against a Peel Bond type primer in that situation is Peel Bond or similar thick elastomeric primers still can and do eventually fail, and the way they peel is not graceful in the slightest, big giant peeling sheets. What do you do next, more Peel Bond over and over? Oil of course can and will eventually fail as well, but likely taking more time than an equivalent latex primer. When oil fails, though, the hardness of oil, and it being smaller alligatored pieces are a lot easier to sand and feather in again, and the new oil primer itself is sandable and to a small extent acts a bit like a skimcoat in providing a sandable new surface to work with. An elastomeric primer has no ability to be sanded or feathered out well. Oil would give you the best looking finish in that scenario compared to a Peel Bond type product.

There's plenty of situations where elastomeric is appropriate, but I think using a Peel Bond type product is essentially the end of the road on a house. Once you go to that option there's basically no turning back short of a full on strip, whereas oil and a normal solid stain or latex paint top coat gives you a normal maintenance cycle where you can do a fairly normal scrape, sand, prime, etc, type job, and not remediation of the old elastomeric coating in whatever amount of years it does take to eventually fail. There's plenty of situations where it is appropriate, and indeed on some houses there's no way you can reasonably get a long lasting job that looks even OK without a full strip down without using an elastomeric primer, and it's 100% appropriate there, especially if a budget is tight or you have environmental issues like lead or asbestos and can't disturb the surface much. (As we saw in another thread recently on here.)

That said, I think many homeowners would want the ability to just have normal basically maintenance level paint jobs done every so many years that cost less money and take less time to do, rather than cover everything with a Peel Bond style primer and have it potentially last longer but then down the road have much more of a mess to deal with.
I don't know what technical data you have to compare Peel Bond to elastomeric primers, but if you indeed do have that data, please share it.
I think it's apples to oranges. They are similar in thickness but chemical properties I suspect are different.
Please share specifics on that.

Also, please share real life examples, (pictures or articles) when Peel Bond failed.
I would love to see that data.
Unless you are talking about Peel Bond being applied over very dusty surface or a surface being constantly moist, moisture coming from the inside of the wall.
In that case every primer will fail.
 

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I read quite extensive journal by a long time historical houses restorer who experimented with various primers and he got really hooked on Peel Bond.
He wrote a blog about it, I used to have links to it, but it was on my previous computer.
I should dig that computer out and see if I can find it.
I'm not sure how I found his blog/articles, perhaps somebody here at PT posted several years ago,
or maybe it came up in Google searches, but it was a very detailed and extremely informative.
I hope I can find it.

Peel Bond by XIM and Peel Stop by Zinsser are not the same products. Not in the same league.
Peel Bond is a Rolls Royce and Peel Stop is a Chevy.
 

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I read quite extensive journal by a long time historical houses restorer who experimented with various primers and he got really hooked on Peel Bond.
He wrote a blog about it, I used to have links to it, but it was on my previous computer.
I should dig that computer out and see if I can find it.
I'm not sure how I found his blog/articles, perhaps somebody here at PT posted several years ago,
or maybe it came up in Google searches, but it was a very detailed and extremely informative.
I hope I can find it.

Peel Bond by XIM and Peel Stop by Zinsser are not the same products. Not in the same league.
Peel Bond is a Rolls Royce and Peel Stop is a Chevy.
I can get a picture of SW's "Me too" primer called PrimeRX failing at my own house, albeit from moisture being trapped under the surface. It doesn't look pretty and it doesn't look like it could easily be feathered in. I kinda neglected you mainly referred to the soffits for Peel Bond vs the siding, but I think that's a potentially dangerous area for those products specifically as most thick elastomeric goopy products fail in horizontal application (ie, all the deck restore products) not vertical, as horizontal surfaces are more likely to trap water in them since water can't run down. My specific failure is on a deck railing, horizontally.

I think the best of the elastomerics based on me actually using it and anecdotal reports is Mad Dog, but Mad Dog is about $100 a gallon now and imo doesn't even seem to be truly water based, you can't clean brushes and rollers with water after using it. If Peel Bond is like that, perhaps it's a better primer. Mad Dog does seem to last a long time, though.

I just think elastomeric primers should be used with caution and as a last resort, not automatically. By how well they seal/entrap you can even cause moisture issues and rot (another painter complained of this to me when I brought them up, had to use a grinder to remove some on a house he was working on, and had moist rotting wood underneath due to the house's inability to breathe.) There's plenty of examples where I'd endorse them, but they're sort of a nuclear option.

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A house like that, or a house like this:
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It's totally appropriate to use them, and likely the best choice within a time and money constraint compared to stripping a whole house. Just I think it's basically negligent to think they should be automatically used in every scenario just because they look better. By using them you can be drastically screwing up the maintenance cycle of whatever you're working on, albeit with the promise/expectation of a few more years. If the thing is already at the end of its life cycle (these two houses I posted) then by all means, use them to get more life, but it's not for everything imo.

Nice seeing you back, btw.
 

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Thank you celicaxx. If I'm not banned by the evening I will respond to your post in the evening.
Interesting info you posted there.
 

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@celicaxx as you say becomes a maintence issue further down the road. I don't even stock a 'peel bond' primer. Shipnshore, fresh start 094 and mooreguard. The only one I would trust is triangle coatings neverpeel as it produces a breathable film and doesn't trap moisture
 

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@celicaxx as you say becomes a maintence issue further down the road. I don't even stock a 'peel bond' primer. Shipnshore, fresh start 094 and mooreguard. The only one I would trust is triangle coatings neverpeel as it produces a breathable film and doesn't trap moisture
Peel Bond creates very breathable and very flexible film and it doesn't trap moisture.
Those are facts.
 

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Peel Bond creates very breathable and very flexible film and it doesn't trap moisture.
Those are facts.
FYI, This thread is posted in the Photos of projects section. It's more of a showcasing rather than a discussion. I'm pretty sure Holland wasn't asking for your advice on this. Just sayin.. But it's very clear that you like Peel Bond. We get it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
FYI, This thread is posted in the Photos of projects section. It's more of a showcasing rather than a discussion. I'm pretty sure Holland wasn't asking for your advice on this. Just sayin.. But it's very clear that you like Peel Bond. We get it.
I don’t mind, not opposed to related discussion, even if I don't agree. I might learn something.

I don’t know much about Perl Bond.

Not appropriate for a Cedar house, but maybe for a pine board siding with layers and layers of failing paint…who knows. ?

I used Peel Stop once on old pine board siding that I did about 10 years ago. It’s difficult to ascertain how well it’s worked. that area hasn’t peeled again yet, but I doubt it would have if I just scraped and primed either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Heres another example of someone who "painted cedar", instead of using a Solid Stain.

The paint almost always fails because moisture can easily get behind the paint film, pushing the paint off the surface. This is especially true of cedar shake and shingles.

It is my belief that Cedar should (almost) always be stained: first with a semi transparent oil-based stain, and then transitioning into a latex Solid Stain.

We removed as much of the failing paint film as we could, and then primed the raw cedar with a tinted Coverstain to block tannin bleed.

Finally we stained all the cedar shingles with a latex Solid Stain, and recommended to the homeowner that they continue to use Solid Stain in subsequent maintenance coats.

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