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Hey There, I'm spray painting with cans of paint in a 12' by 20' one car garage with a 7.5' high ceiling. The fumes are quite toxic and need to be removed!
I've read that you take your all 3 measurements and multiple them together to get your cfm for the room. Then buy a fan according to the cfm of your room so it has enough power to exhaust your room. I live in British Columbia so its very cold here in the winter to open the garage door to paint because the paint doesnt dry when it is cold.
I have one 2.5' by 2.5' to vent out and 8" opening in the wall opposite to the window that i could put a intake fan. I have a polyed off 20" box fan in the window right now but its not moving that much air through the room. Some say box fans push around 2500cfm and other says they push around 250cfm. But this obviously isnt working well enough because its only strongly pulling air/smoke about 2' away from the fan.
So my question is what would be the most efficient way to properly vent my garage
- Without spending a excessive amount of money?
- How much cfm do i really need?
- Possibly 2 fans for exhaust and 1 for intake?
- Range Hood maybe?
Here is a few options ive been considering:
First 2 links i was thinking buying 2 or each and 3 link i was just going to purchase the one because its more expensive.
http://www.homedepot.ca/product/aerodynamic-turbo-aire-high-velocity-fan/941378
http://www.harborfreight.com/8-inch-portable-ventilator-97762.html
http://www.homehardware.ca/en/rec/i.../N-1r4p8mZntjlbZhv7jjZbwvhrZ1qjdmp/R-I5245022

Please let me know what you think and suggestions, this isn’t for painting cars but for painting art

Thank you
 

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You need bigger intake hole and sealed fan to it. Also if air is toxic you need a respirator system. If you are moving air through then it will be cold inside as well.
 

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No real way of doing it without spending a chunk of change.

Take the air intake first. You don't need a fan to draw air into the room. Passive intake openings that are filtered should do the trick if your air exhaust fan can pull enough air.

Air exhaust. This is where you need to spend the money. First of all, if this is going to be a dedicated spray room, you'll probably be spraying both non-flammable and flammable materials. You need an explosion proof fan. Most of these will pull the volume of air through the passive intake and out the room through the exhaust.

The other thing you'll want to consider is where to mount the fan. Everybody thinks the higher you go the better it is. Not so. Ideally, you want to create a down draft. Pulls all the overspray and dust down instead of where your spraying items. Make sense?

Check craigslist. Every once in a while you can find these fans for sale. I just bought one for $200 - he was asking $300. No dickering, I just asked what his bottom dollar was.
 
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