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Discussion Starter #21
Anything above a homeowner pump to push 200 ft of hose to 2nd+ story? No. If you want good performance and want your pump to last, go for a 1095 or if you can afford it a 1595. You never regret bigger...but budget is an issue. SW will finance that 1595 for you for a year most likely with no interest. We do have probably 25 440's and 395's...but they're 50' of 3/8" hose and no big tips. They're good little pumps...but only for what they're meant for.
Thanks for your guidance! I have only been spraying for four months, and I really appreciate all the comments.

FYI: I am just getting going as a full time painting contractor, and I am trying to get a machine that will last, but also balance the cost of the machine.

Someone mentioned that being able to hear your machine is very important. Also, I have noticed that cleaning out that much hose is inefficient on small jobs. So, I am reconsidering the 200' of hose.

I am only doing residential repaints, and I am currently using 75' of hose (50' of 1/4, and 25' of 3/8). I am thinking that for most jobs that I will be doing, this is plenty.

With this setup, do you still recommend a 1095 or greater? Would a 490 to a 695 be too small for a two man crew doing residential repaints? I have considered a Titan 640 stand because of it's ability to fit in my currently tight vehicle.

Do you have a suggestion? Comments?

Thanks!
 

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Thanks for your guidance! I have only been spraying for four months, and I really appreciate all the comments.

FYI: I am just getting going as a full time painting contractor, and I am trying to get a machine that will last, but also balance the cost of the machine.

Someone mentioned that being able to hear your machine is very important. Also, I have noticed that cleaning out that much hose is inefficient on small jobs. So, I am reconsidering the 200' of hose.

I am only doing residential repaints, and I am currently using 75' of hose (50' of 1/4, and 25' of 3/8). I am thinking that for most jobs that I will be doing, this is plenty.

With this setup, do you still recommend a 1095 or greater? Would a 490 to a 695 be too small for a two man crew doing residential repaints? I have considered a Titan 640 stand because of it's ability to fit in my currently tight vehicle.

Do you have a suggestion? Comments?

Thanks!
I run 125' of hose plus a 3' whip on my Titan 640i all the time when doing exteriors. Allows me to make 1 spot home base for the sprayer and not have to move it around the house. Spraying 2 coats on a home with a shorter hose would require moving the sprayer 2-4 times, and that might be favorable to some, but not to me. Anything 125' and over on the 640 is pushing the capabilities of the pump to the max before you start to see a decline in performance via pulsation of spray pattern. Thicker paints, frequent triggering, & working at elevations will also have an effect. This can be mitigated by using larger diameter hoses, which minimizes friction loss, thus, still capable of providing sufficient pressure. If all you're doing is the occasional trigger pull, you could get away with using 150' of 1/4", but I find that's rarely the case.

On exterior 2-4 story homes, the first 100' connected to my 640i is 3/8", then 25' of 1/4", plus my 3' whip. For 1 level exteriors, you could stay with 1/4" for the entire run, but anytime you're needing to climb extension ladders and spray, 3/8" is favorable for lengths of 100' and over with the 640i.

For interiors, hose is taken off as needed. If I'm doing walls and ceilings, I'll stay with the larger diameter 3/8" hose. It's heavy as hell and a PITA, but it's the best way to run longer lengths of hoses on a pump that size without suffering pulsation. For interior trim, 1/4" hose can be used.

Although opinions may vary as to what you might "need", I think most of would agree that it's never a bad thing to have the largest size you can afford if it's between say a 695 vs. 1095, or 640i vs. 740i. Smaller pumps can work, but will wear noticeably quicker when pushed to their limit. We've all at one time or another have probably used a smaller pump than what might seem ideal. Hell, my first 7 years in business I did everything with 395's & 490's. All boils down to budget, expectations, what you're spraying, how much you're spraying, & how fast you need to spray it.
 

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I have three pumps, a 695 1095 and an old gas 5000. I have one line that is 100 feet long with 1/4 inch diameter hose, one 150 foot hose with a 1/4 inch diameter hose and a 150 foot one with a 3/8 inch for the first 50 feet and then 100 feet of 1/4 inch diameter. I pick and choose depending on the job. Each hose has its own gun so I don't have to worry about forgetting one. I do have a 50 foot section for real small jobs. All have a 3 foot whip. I do not have any dedicated oil lines as I don't spray any more of that crap.
 

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Thanks for your guidance! I have only been spraying for four months, and I really appreciate all the comments.

FYI: I am just getting going as a full time painting contractor, and I am trying to get a machine that will last, but also balance the cost of the machine.

Someone mentioned that being able to hear your machine is very important. Also, I have noticed that cleaning out that much hose is inefficient on small jobs. So, I am reconsidering the 200' of hose.

I am only doing residential repaints, and I am currently using 75' of hose (50' of 1/4, and 25' of 3/8). I am thinking that for most jobs that I will be doing, this is plenty.

With this setup, do you still recommend a 1095 or greater? Would a 490 to a 695 be too small for a two man crew doing residential repaints? I have considered a Titan 640 stand because of it's ability to fit in my currently tight vehicle.

Do you have a suggestion? Comments?

Thanks!
If you're just doing res repaint, 75-100' of hose and a heavy extension cord is perfect. A good 12/3ga extension cord will save your pump motor. Honestly, if you're not painting with heavy products (you mentioned elastomeric) you'd be fine with a 440i, but if you're going to mix in some occasional heavier viscosity projects the 640 would be okay, the 695 if you can afford the extra money would have way more balls. ALL my guys, without exception, prefer a high boy over a low boy....but if you can't fit it you can't fit it. A high boy makes your life easier, and it works the pump less to have direct immersion.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I run 125' of hose plus a 3' whip on my Titan 640i all the time when doing exteriors. Allows me to make 1 spot home base for the sprayer and not have to move it around the house. Spraying 2 coats on a home with a shorter hose would require moving the sprayer 2-4 times, and that might be favorable to some, but not to me. Anything 125' and over on the 640 is pushing the capabilities of the pump to the max before you start to see a decline in performance via pulsation of spray pattern. Thicker paints, frequent triggering, & working at elevations will also have an effect. This can be mitigated by using larger diameter hoses, which minimizes friction loss, thus, still capable of providing sufficient pressure. If all you're doing is the occasional trigger pull, you could get away with using 150' of 1/4", but I find that's rarely the case.

On exterior 2-4 story homes, the first 100' connected to my 640i is 3/8", then 25' of 1/4", plus my 3' whip. For 1 level exteriors, you could stay with 1/4" for the entire run, but anytime you're needing to climb extension ladders and spray, 3/8" is favorable for lengths of 100' and over with the 640i.

For interiors, hose is taken off as needed. If I'm doing walls and ceilings, I'll stay with the larger diameter 3/8" hose. It's heavy as hell and a PITA, but it's the best way to run longer lengths of hoses on a pump that size without suffering pulsation. For interior trim, 1/4" hose can be used.

Although opinions may vary as to what you might "need", I think most of would agree that it's never a bad thing to have the largest size you can afford if it's between say a 695 vs. 1095, or 640i vs. 740i. Smaller pumps can work, but will wear noticeably quicker when pushed to their limit. We've all at one time or another have probably used a smaller pump than what might seem ideal. Hell, my first 7 years in business I did everything with 395's & 490's. All boils down to budget, expectations, what you're spraying, how much you're spraying, & how fast you need to spray it.

EXACTLY the info I needed! Thank you!!!!
 
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