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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was recently cleaning up my Studio and went through some Old Samples I did a while ago. Some Burls can be Very Complex . Posting some Pics of Panels and Jobs I have done in the past , I am Very Appreciative of the Positive Comments I receive. Some people have said.... ( I wish I could do that ! ) Woodgraining is Far from easy, and Even just Straight Grain can be Extremly Complex.

This Burl Panel is not very involved.....
In Fact.... It is Very Doable....

Many people on the forum have asked me if I have any videos out.... Not Yet.

Would anyone be interested in me posting the instructions to do this ?
If so,would you post your Panel?


I can give very understandable instructions



Michael Tust
 

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michael tust said:
I was recently cleaning up my Studio and went through some Old Samples I did a while ago. Some Burls can be Very Complex . Posting some Pics of Panels and Jobs I have done in the past , I am Very Appreciative of the Positive Comments I receive. Some people have said.... ( I wish I could do that ! ) Woodgraining is Far from easy, and Even just Straight Grain can be Extremly Complex.

This Burl Panel is not very involved.....
In Fact.... It is Very Doable....

Many people on the forum have asked me if I have any videos out.... Not Yet.

Would anyone be interested in me posting the instructions to do this ?
If so,would you post your Panel?

I can give very understandable instructions

Michael Tust
Michael,
I have been wanting to start doing more wood graining. I would do a sample panel at my first opportunity. I would be real interested in your personal burl wood recipe. As usual awesome photo.
Thanks buddy,
Jay
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Michael,
I have been wanting to start doing more wood graining. I would do a sample panel at my first opportunity. I would be real interested in your personal burl wood recipe. As usual awesome photo.
Thanks buddy,
Jay
Great!

I will also post progresive pictures and explain what and why I am doing at each segment.


Michael Tust
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Without a doubt yes. I will make a go of it and post here as well. Are you the one who did the quarter sawn oak doors? The curly maple behind the burl there? That as well.
No, those were not my Doors.....
The adjacent Wood is Sycamore.....

Believe it or Not.....
The Sycamore is A Lot Tougher then the Burl.....

It is Always Interesting to see the different Panels when complete.


Michael Tust
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK Finally !!

I hope the pictures are decent to view.

Mix 1 part linseed oil to 3 parts turpintine and 5% japan drier... This is your Glaze

Artist Oil Colors are ... Burnt Sienna .. Van **** Brown .. Black .. and Carmine Red...


Step 1 .... Basecoat using a Satin.... or even Eggshell Sheen.. Ben Moore # 125

Step 2 .... With a 2 inch Chip Brush... Mix a touch of the Glaze with the Artist Oil Colors in the order Listed.... Meaning Burnt Sienna ... Van **** the Main Colors... Black... Carmine... Much Less.... You are Looking to Mix a Strong Brown Tone.

Step 3
Brush out in All Directions...
You want to leave Areas that are Darker and Lighter...

Step 4
Now texture the Areas by stippling into the wet Glaze with the chip Brush,Bristles Splayed by your fingers as you work..

Step 5
Soften the Areas using a Badger Brush very carefully not to Blend but to make more subtle.

Step 6 ( if needed ) ( optional )
Pick up some stronger color with the Chip Brush or the points of a small Sea Sponge and lightly Stipple on the Darker Areas of you Panel. Soften with the Badger.



Michael Tust
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Other Glaze Options......

Substitute Turpintine with Mineral Spirits....

Purchase Pre Made Glazeing liguid and tint with Cal Tint....

Waterbase..... Modern Masters Tintable Glaze.....

Polyvine Scumble Glaze.....

Sherwin Williams Glaze.....

I prefer Oil for Graining.

Michael Tust
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Michael, if you havnt tried the Goldens Proceed, you really should. I was a disbeliever until Marc Potocsky showed me after he was shown by Pierre F. It really has an oil feel about it and the slow drying acrylics colors are great. I still tweek with UTC. I dont think I would ever go back to oil.
I have not tried that Yet..... Really hard to believe in the Slow drying Acrylics when they usually come up short of the Oils. I always yap about the same old thing, the layers of undergraining that can be acomplished prior to the Oil Overglaze.

I'm sure to try it at some point. When I was trained by Pierre,he was using Oil at that time. And.... I must have a Hundred tubes of Artist Oils here!

Michael Tust
 

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I think Pierre uses mostly Proceed now. As a matter of fact, I think he worked with Golden when it was being developed. It actually can stay open as long as oil and sometimes longer.:eek:.......I have even had to add (about a cup of clear to a gal and a half of glaze) of clear acrylic varnish to help speed it up. It works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I think Pierre uses mostly Proceed now. As a matter of fact, I think he worked with Golden when it was being developed. It actually can stay open as long as oil and sometimes longer.:eek:.......I have even had to add (about a cup of clear to a gal and a half of glaze) of clear acrylic varnish to help speed it up. It works.
I have heard good things about Proceed.... And I am sure he uses it as much as possible.. But we will never really know.. As he does sell it on his Website ( if you know what I mean ) .
:whistling2:


Michael Tust
 
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