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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently did a large interior repaint for a great customer! It came out beautifully, and as part of the process, an interior decorator I know came in and did a venetian plaster on a small downstairs bathroom -- roughly 6'x6'. It was a separate contract, and not executed under my project, but she was a friend of mine.

Anyway, no fault of hers, the customer doesn't like the effect, and wants to paint over it. OK by me, but, the plaster has been burnished with wax, in the traditional way.

I don't know of anything that sticks to wax, so I'm thinking I have to remove it.
How would you go about doing this?

Am I correct in thinking that xylene or toluene dissolve wax, and so therefore, a solvent wash could get up the majority of it, allowing me to sand and prime as normal?;

OR
Is the best course of action maybe brute force? I could just sand aggressively, and use up as many sanding pads as it takes with my 9" drywall sander?;

OR
Is there any chance that I could penetrate below the plaster, and find a line of cleavage between the plaster and the acrylic primer below. It was Ben Moore 023 if I remember correctly. If it would come off in sheets, I know it could be prepped and skim coated like a wallpaper removal, and, presumably, bid like one.

Thanks for your thoughts!
-JH
 

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Depends, what was the product? There is a product that is called Vella, that uses wax, polished not burnished that creates the old world look. That stuff can be topcoated with any acrylic primer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not sure what product she used, but we use the same paint supplier, so I will ask. Thanks for mentioning Vella, and wouldn't have thought to ask.
 

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I recently did a large interior repaint for a great customer! It came out beautifully, and as part of the process, an interior decorator I know came in and did a venetian plaster on a small downstairs bathroom -- roughly 6'x6'. It was a separate contract, and not executed under my project, but she was a friend of mine.

Anyway, no fault of hers, the customer doesn't like the effect, and wants to paint over it. OK by me, but, the plaster has been burnished with wax, in the traditional way.

I don't know of anything that sticks to wax, so I'm thinking I have to remove it.
How would you go about doing this?

Am I correct in thinking that xylene or toluene dissolve wax, and so therefore, a solvent wash could get up the majority of it, allowing me to sand and prime as normal?;

OR
Is the best course of action maybe brute force? I could just sand aggressively, and use up as many sanding pads as it takes with my 9" drywall sander?;

OR
Is there any chance that I could penetrate below the plaster, and find a line of cleavage between the plaster and the acrylic primer below. It was Ben Moore 023 if I remember correctly. If it would come off in sheets, I know it could be prepped and skim coated like a wallpaper removal, and, presumably, bid like one.

Thanks for your thoughts!
-JH
Always a good thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, I emailed the customer. Gave her a best/worst case scenario rather than a flat price. Described the process as a wash with mineral spirits, then a lighter solvent (xylene), then aggressive abrasion, skim coat, prime, finish.

If I can get under the plaster, then so much the better, but I think we're all informed of the realistic scope of the project. "Manage your customer's expectations from beginning to end" is one of my axioms.
 

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Sounds like a good axiom. Once their expectations get derailed by their imagination that's when things go wrong. Or when you say one thing and do another, tend to see you as either a liar or hack, maybe both. Good way to handle it.

as far as the process, sounds like it would work. Instead of xylene I would use laq. thinner to clean off the mineral spirits. It will dry faster. And depending on how all that turns out you might be able to tone down the aggressive abrasion and do a quick scuff sand with maybe 100 grit, assuming the stuff isn't gummy. You can put wax over a water base so you might find that the chemicals could make things gummy. Just something to watch for.

The rest of your process looks good. I'd recommend skim coating with hot mud as it dries faster and harder.

Good luck, let us know how it turns out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The rest of your process looks good. I'd recommend skim coating with hot mud as it dries faster and harder.
Hot Mud! You mean, like durabond 20, or an actually heated-up pail of pre-mixed compound? :jester:

Maybe Laq thinner would be better. Thanks.
 

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Hot mud is like USG 20 minute or 45 minute mud. They call it hot because it cures chemically and hardens. Versus the regular mud which dries out and get hard via evaporation.

Depending on how big the project and your skill, 45 min to 90 min. would be a good mud.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I like EZ Sand 45, but a taper told me about that USG mud. It's hard to find around here, apparently. Have to special order it, so I haven't had an excuse to try it.

Definitely using "hot" mud though. :)
 

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I like EZ Sand 45, but a taper told me about that USG mud. It's hard to find around here, apparently. Have to special order it, so I haven't had an excuse to try it.

Definitely using "hot" mud though. :)

Do they not have it at home depot or lowes where your at?

Edit:
They have 45 minute mud at the Waterford store. 99 bags. ;)

And EZ Sand is made by USG.
 

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EZ Sand is USG. See top left of bag.

I buy it for just under $8.75 bag here. Looks like your prices at $11 a piece is kinda steep. See if you can negotiate it down or find a drywall shop that might have it cheaper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't think they do. USG makes EZ Sand and Durabond, which I can get anywhere. But you're talking about a different product, right? I don't actually remember what he called the other product, but I'll ask him. I see him tomorrow.
 

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I don't think they do. USG makes EZ Sand and Durabond, which I can get anywhere. But you're talking about a different product, right? I don't actually remember what he called the other product, but I'll ask him. I see him tomorrow.

EZ Sand is the same thing. Just s name for the product. And yes it was the one I was referring to. I'm just use to not calling it easy sand, just 45 min mud or 20 min mud. Guys here just know what you mean.

As for other brands there are some, but I know USG is pretty stout with their stuff, so I recommend it and haven't had issue with it. Assuming you apply it right etc.
 
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