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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Okay Gang! You're smart, you're clever, and I'm damn tired! I stained three door slabs today. Even though I'm in good shape, seriously...There has got to be an easier way to do the pre-hungs. I don't know if my body will handle me slinging 18 more around. Not to mention I'm not looking forward to taking them all out of the frames, and removing hinges. I basically have a 16 x 60 space to work on this project, with 8 foot ceilings.

Could I accordion them or something? Somehow lash them to the ceiling? It's an unfinished room.

Please tell me how you would stain and clear coat (water-borne poly) pre-hung solid oak doors.
 

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R u brushing ouy or spraying? If your brushing out then accordian them with 2 x 2s or something upside down then when u hang them stain and clear the tops ?. Or just do them all while there hung.
 

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Dry as Rye
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There's a tool made specifically to accordion doors. I used it once. Run strapping between them all. Single screw in each end of the strapping. The weight will hold them together. Fill your holes when done. Hopefully you're either ragging or spraying. Then continue being a happy girl. The world needs more happy painters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm brushing/wiping the stain on. When they're all stained, that's when I clear coat...Because I'd rather spray a lot than just three doors and have to clean my sprayer.

The inside of the house is already painted, so I would rather not work on them once they are installed...Unless I want to brush them! (Which I really don't.)
 

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Dry as Rye
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So pick an approach, plan it as efficiently as possible, and bang it out. If you're doing both sides, start with the hinged side first. Run your casing next, then the rest of the door. Planning, efficiency, happy.
 

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Cake work. I have to do this type of stuff almost all the time (new construction). Which usually means staining 16+ doors per house, plus jambs, etc.

1. Remove the door from the door jamb (leave hinges on if pre-hung).

2. Mask off hinges with tape or you could even use the plastic hinge covers if your trying to speed things up.

3. Use a top hanger setup, it's basically a cleat that gets nailed into the top of the doors vs. the hinge straps. Lets you stand the doors up according style, just a different mounting system. No one ever sees the holes at the top, putty if you want afterwards.

4. Clean off doors (any dust/sawdust residue) with rags. Scuff sand with 220 or whatever grit(s) your going to do.

5. Clean off sanding residue, and pre-wash / condition for staining.

6. Spray stain, wipe off.

7. Top coat once stain is dry and go back to scuff sand the sealer. Spray finish coat. Next day or same day (depending on time crunch) remove hinges and install.


** If you have a room that is already finished, you mentioned a 16x60, just drop some 9ft plastic down off the walls and you should be alright (or zip wall). For spraying stain for wiping, you don't have to be super far away from the door, a foot tops will work just fine, so over spray should be minimal. **

Depending on the job/request, the number of doors, and the crew you have. Should be able to knock out the doors in 2 or 3 days tops.

Good luck and let us know what you ended up doing!

edit:
** Make sure to number the doors, use some tape at the top of each door or maker them off. So you know which door goes to what door jamb. **

* Forgot about the floors. If already finished or if you don't want to dirty the concrete, depending on the job (staining concrete afterwards etc.). Get some heavy mil plastic and put it down so when you wipe the doors the stain won't puddle on the floor/concrete. Grab a Butyl II drop cloth or similar and put it on top so you won't have any issues. *

I'm sure you know all this already, I'm just saying to cover the bases.
 

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If you just pop the pin from the hinge you can get some plastic hinge protectors. We have a bunch we got from SW and have used them on doors we sprayed or stained. They are very easy to install and remove and do a great job of keeping the paint off the hinge. I tried finding a picture on the interweb but can't find them. I would take a pic of the ones I have but they are in my van (which is broken down).

We use strapping to hold the doors up installed like the other said.
 

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Well you need a lambswool staining pad if you are not spraying the stain (spraying stain is very messy). If you are using a rag to apply the stain, you are losing a ton of time.

Amazon.com: Wooster Brush BR424-5-1/2 1/2 Nap Wool Pad Painter, 5-1/2-Inch: Home Improvement

Also, you don't have to do the accordion thing if you don't want. You can just cover one wall in the room (the biggest wall without a window) and spray the doors on that wall. I usually can do 4-5 at a time.
 

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I've never seen that one before!!


Sent from my blah blah blah
I've got one and will pick up another this fall. Seal the tops and bottoms first, then put door in stand.

I can't understand why the other rack systems receive so much attention when there's sooooooo much handling during the finishing process and some you can only finish one side at a time.:blink:

Now what I'd like is a similar system for cabinet doors.
I currently use a hanger/rod system which works ok.
Wish I'd have gotten this one while it was still in stock.
http://www.woodworks.bravepages.com/Cabinet-Pro_Panel_Finishing_Systems.html
 

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Interesting little jig. I like the idea of it, but what about any over spray issues? Especially when painting where pressures are usually higher?

I usually end up having 2 or 3 rows of doors, usually in the garage. The rows are separated by about 4ft or so to keep overspraying onto the other doors in the next row. Especially with stain, if the droplets are small it isn't noticeable, but any big marks of overspray have to be sanded away.

That would be my only concern with that system, but I'm interested in hearing what others that have used it say.

Good find!
 

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eric
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Put two t's on the top ( 2"x 12")and two blocks on the bottom, walk them to the wall, work one side, turn. keep a bolt the same size as the latch orifice, put it in place. It helps keep control if you are alone. If I'm trapped for space and have help i screw a 2x 4 on the floor in front of the first tier of doors, walk the doors up on the 2 by and raise the level. Usually work a door in a separate area to keep your materials in order and cut down on dust issues.
 

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We do that type of work frequently and have for about 25 years. On some large hotels that we have done out in Whistler, we have done hundreds of stain grade doors. We just completed 60 maple doors in a house that we are presently working in.
Organization is the key for us, and each job has different space parameters and requirements.
On Site Shop: we lay out vapor barrier to protect concrete then cover with OSB for a good working floor surface.
Staining: we prefer wiping stain applied with doors lying flat. We find that we can do better work like that (also we're kind of old so it we bend over too far..might just stay down there). We use chemcraft wipe stains which allow us to handle and flip after very minimal dry time. We then move our doors to a drying area.
Spraying clears: when space is tight we will spray our doors accordion style, however; we don't really like the dry spray issues that sometimes occur. When space and time allow we will lean doors side by side with a few feet between and spray in that way. We will often use OSB as a backstop. This method is less production oriented than standing accordion style but we feel it enables us to do a better job of sanding between coats, cleaning, and achieving a nice finish. Kind of a compromise in production for higher quality. Spraying doors lying flat is great but we worry about the weight of solid wood doors and the potential for bowing if stacked horizontal.
 

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Woodcoyote has a good system, Cover all the walls with painter plastic in that work area, I double tape over or use 2 sided tape on the walls behind the plastic to keep the plastic from blowing on to the door when spraying. I use cardboard for the floors to place the doors on and use 2'' tape at the height the doors will contact the plastic at 2 or 3 layers so one layer can be removed in between the finish coats.

Remove all the doors at the same time and line them up in the room on the wall, use a sprayer to apply stain to being wet but not dripping like crazy and immediately wipe down excess with rags. I use bath towels cut in strips that I get from thrift stores and the flip the doors.
Not sure if you are using waterbased stain or oil, if waterbased practice on the inside of a closet door first.
I have never done doors with it just be sure if you spray them that you get a good finish

I am not experienced using water poly on doors as well but I use solvent lacquer sanding sealer and finish coats and the doors and they can be coated and flipped over in minutes in most cases and having the doors angled to not lie flat against the walls prevent problems with stain or finish building up on the tops of the doors and watch out for dried material flaking off the plastic when you spray.

In my opinion accordian doors works, I do it often as I need to but having walls to spray on and flipping them is more controlled and I can do a lot of doors in a pretty small area and having a helper to flip and move doors is what you need.
 
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