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I've worked on historical homes. Never worked on something like this. It's my in-laws cottage. Built in 1930's. No idea when last painted. It is oil. Denatured alcohol doesn't even touch it. I know it is going to take a lot of prep work. Scraping and sanding, not looking forward to. However, I am looking forward to reglazing the windows. The chinking is horse hair and mortar, looks like cement, to me. Some of this chinking looks like it is more than just paint alligatoring/cracking. What would I use to fill in the detoriated areas? Any paint suggestions? In-laws want oil, no latex. Since I'm painting/prepping this for free, the paint budget doesn't really matter. What exterior oil would perform best? I know that's a loaded question and that it really depends on prep level. I have never prepped a project like this. The rounded logs...do I use my RO-90? No idea what would work best.
 

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Ignoring the rot areas for now, I think that you should have a conversation with them about how oil based stuff is brittle and hard once cured and won't handle the constant expansion / contraction and will all just crack again.

Personally, I'd wash the living daylights out of it, see about fixing the rot while doing the scraping and all and be laying on a thick coat of some equivalent of peel-bond. Something thick and stretchy that would get down in the cracks, but not harden up. Then I'd top coat with a high quality exterior latex (I use BM Regal Ext).

If they want to stick with oil, tell them to just get used to the cracks.

Others may have better suggestions...
 

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Agree with pressure wash, scrape loose/peeling paint.
Prime raw wood with oil based primer, switch to 100% Acrylic Exterior Paint.

If oil based paint was last used topcoat (paint will be hard and smooth, not rubbery feeling like latex) then prime everything first. Coverstain is a good primer for this.

The Coors is for you? Your “payment”?
 

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The decay on the logs due to end grains wicking up moisture, especially those sitting on the sill plate, and the logs above the windows & doors (cripples?), really need to be addressed & consolidated. I’d probably drill a bunch of holes in the logs where decayed and use a syringe to inject a clear penetrating epoxy consolidant such as Abatron Liquid Wood, and possibly even inject some type of borate treatment or even drill and insert Cobra-Rods which contain borate & copper compounds to inhibit further decay. After fortifying the decay, I’d use a 2 part epoxy filler for repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Agree with pressure wash, scrape loose/peeling paint.
Prime raw wood with oil based primer, switch to 100% Acrylic Exterior Paint.

If oil based paint was last used topcoat (paint will be hard and smooth, not rubbery feeling like latex) then prime everything first. Coverstain is a good primer for this.

The Coors is for you? Your “payment”?
Yes, the Coors is part of the deal. 😆
I originally suggested a latex topcoat. In-laws don't like the feel of latex, too rubbery. The ironic part is that they paint everything with box store paint that begins with a "B". Made it clear I will not use that, no matter how many Coors later. Don't even know if they make exterior oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The decay on the logs due to end grains wicking up moisture, especially those sitting on the sill plate, and the logs above the windows & doors (cripples?), really need to be addressed & consolidated. I’d probably drill a bunch of holes in the logs where decayed and use a syringe to inject a clear penetrating epoxy consolidant such as Abatron Liquid Wood, and possibly even inject some type of borate treatment or even drill and insert Cobra-Rods which contain borate & copper compounds to inhibit further decay. After fortifying the decay, I’d use a 2 part epoxy filler for repairs.
Thank you! I will have to research Cobra-Rods. Never heard of that before.
 

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OP- "...Since I'm painting/prepping this for free, the paint budget doesn't really matter."

Of course the paint budget doesn't matter to the In-Laws since materials are only a fraction of the job costs. This is a huge Red Flag. I mean, how long do your In-Laws expect you to volunteer your time away from your own family, friends and an actual income in order to address what appears to be the homeowner's neglect? But what do I know. You may be idly rich, like painting as a hobby, owe a huge debt to the In-Laws, or are afraid to stand your ground and ask for compensation.

If it was me, I would offer them a prepping and painting system that aligned with the time I was willing to donate. Otherwise, they could have you dragging this job on for months employing a top notch system because money's no object. Particularly, since it'll never exist in your pocket.

I guess this sums up how I feel about working for family and friends.

Happy Easter!
 

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My wife once 'offered' me to go to Toronto to paint the interior of our in laws house. I told her she'd have to call them back and explain that I wouldn't be doing it. Period. I hate going to the city and wouldn't back down. It didn't exactly end well, and did result in several days of her trying to convince me as it was a little embarrassing for her to have to back pedal on the offer. Not my problem, shouldn't have offered me without talking to me first.

Last time that ever happened.
 

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My wife once 'offered' me to go to Toronto to paint the interior of our in laws house. I told her she'd have to call them back and explain that I wouldn't be doing it. Period. I hate going to the city and wouldn't back down. It didn't exactly end well, and did result in several days of her trying to convince me as it was a little embarrassing for her to have to back pedal on the offer. Not my problem, shouldn't have offered me without talking to me first.

Last time that ever happened.
You would think that true family and friends would support your success by compensating your efforts rather than burden it by exploiting your relationship with them for their own gains.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I totally agree about the compensation thing. I will be doing this when I have some down time. Or work some downtime in my schedule. I think this would be a fun project. I want to explore new things and hopefully better myself in the process. I'm not in debt, but they do allow my family to use whenever we like.
 

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The decay on the logs due to end grains wicking up moisture, especially those sitting on the sill plate, and the logs above the windows & doors (cripples?), really need to be addressed & consolidated. I’d probably drill a bunch of holes in the logs where decayed and use a syringe to inject a clear penetrating epoxy consolidant such as Abatron Liquid Wood, and possibly even inject some type of borate treatment or even drill and insert Cobra-Rods which contain borate & copper compounds to inhibit further decay. After fortifying the decay, I’d use a 2 part epoxy filler for repairs.
We often use Minwax wood hardener for punky wood. It's easy to source locally.

I'm guessing its not as effective as the epoxy you're suggesting, but is is defiantly better than nothing, and is readily available. Could be injected into wood...

41qujLBSqzL._AC_.jpg


Yes, the Coors is part of the deal. 😆
I originally suggested a latex topcoat. In-laws don't like the feel of latex, too rubbery. The ironic part is that they paint everything with box store paint that begins with a "B". Made it clear I will not use that, no matter how many Coors later. Don't even know if they make exterior oil.
Exterior Oils are being-phased out of the industry wide. Not only are they environmentally more impactful, but they are typically regarding as being inferior to modern Exterior Acrylic and Latex paints for most exterior applications (decks stains being a notable exception, where oil based decks stains outperform water-based).
Oils are not as colorfast, they become brittle as they age, and requires more extensive prep for re-paint.
 

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OP- "...Since I'm painting/prepping this for free, the paint budget doesn't really matter."

Of course the paint budget doesn't matter to the In-Laws since materials are only a fraction of the job costs. This is a huge Red Flag. I mean, how long do your In-Laws expect you to volunteer your time away from your own family, friends and an actual income in order to address what appears to be the homeowner's neglect? But what do I know. You may be idly rich, like painting as a hobby, owe a huge debt to the In-Laws, or are afraid to stand your ground and ask for compensation.

If it was me, I would offer them a prepping and painting system that aligned with the time I was willing to donate. Otherwise, they could have you dragging this job on for months employing a top notch system because money's no object. Particularly, since it'll never exist in your pocket.

I guess this sums up how I feel about working for family and friends.

Happy Easter!
Happy Easter
 

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I've worked on historical homes. Never worked on something like this. It's my in-laws cottage. Built in 1930's. No idea when last painted. It is oil. Denatured alcohol doesn't even touch it. I know it is going to take a lot of prep work. Scraping and sanding, not looking forward to. However, I am looking forward to reglazing the windows. The chinking is horse hair and mortar, looks like cement, to me. Some of this chinking looks like it is more than just paint alligatoring/cracking. What would I use to fill in the detoriated areas? Any paint suggestions? In-laws want oil, no latex. Since I'm painting/prepping this for free, the paint budget doesn't really matter. What exterior oil would perform best? I know that's a loaded question and that it really depends on prep level. I have never prepped a project like this. The rounded logs...do I use my RO-90? No idea what would work best.
You can start with some carbide tipped scapers, 36 grit sand paper for rough areas, possible oil prime raw wood only (slow dry only - ben Moore exterior or swp), I would then light sand all surfaces, quality latex primer - you can use behr is saving few bucks, big question if you want to stain or paint in the end, if previously stained arbor coat, or aur eggshell top coat, behr ultra premium probably has most glues for your dollar- might have to show clerk how to tint - not fair. as for glazed window - find latex primer that sticks, and i have been using dap latex caulk - takes getting use to and does not look as good as old 33, but you can paint in three days and not have to prime. if you use latex caulk- leave ridges on the glass - scrape later with razor blade after dry 3" takes seconds but make sure you scrape ridge off the mutton while your working. what ever you do do not use fast dry oil primer
 

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OP- "...Since I'm painting/prepping this for free, the paint budget doesn't really matter."

Of course the paint budget doesn't matter to the In-Laws since materials are only a fraction of the job costs. This is a huge Red Flag. I mean, how long do your In-Laws expect you to volunteer your time away from your own family, friends and an actual income in order to address what appears to be the homeowner's neglect? But what do I know. You may be idly rich, like painting as a hobby, owe a huge debt to the In-Laws, or are afraid to stand your ground and ask for compensation.

If it was me, I would offer them a prepping and painting system that aligned with the time I was willing to donate. Otherwise, they could have you dragging this job on for months employing a top notch system because money's no object. Particularly, since it'll never exist in your pocket.

I guess this sums up how I feel about working for family and friends.

Happy Easter!
Always interested to hear how other painters feel working for friends and family.

I'm all good with given close friends and family a deal but it gets awkward when friends or others in social circles expect discounts or 'mates rates'

When I started my business I would try and give everyone I knew discounts but I was essentially just decreasing my income and getting nothing back in return as selfish as that sounds. Now a cringe when friends ask me to do work at their house.

Apologies to the OP for the change of topic but something I enjoy a rant about.

Sent from my SM-G781W using Tapatalk
 

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Few years ago I got a call from a woman who I hadn't worked for in several years. Major PITA. She asked me what my rate was at the time. It had gone up a fair bit from the last time I'd worked for her. She asked if I had a program for return customers where I charged them the amount from when I last worked for them.

No Karen, I don't have a program like that.
 
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