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I am quoting an hisstorical building that has many layers of lead paint. The painting specs require all paint to be removed by using infrared. It is a large brick building that has wood eaves, wood trim, window, shutters and doors..... Can you help me with production rates to remove paint by using infrared or heat guns?

Thank you for your help.

Merv
 

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That's not fair. If you don't know production rates for paint that's one thing...but infrared stripping...that seems legit to me.
I was just thinking that the variable aspect of this would be just as much an issue as painting production rates are - maybe even more so.
 
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I have the speed heater infra red paint stripping system. Its a slow process and the fumes from burning paint make you ill even with a paper dust mask. You would be looking at 2 square metres per hour labour plus additional scraping and sandpapering on top of that estimate.
 

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I was just thinking that the variable aspect of this would be just as much an issue as painting production rates are - maybe even more so.
You right I know a painter in Vermont and Cali that do this type of removal and their prices are no wheres close to each other. Like other said overhead, insurance, comp are different rates so it is impossible to give any one even a rough estimate on this forum. When we do lead jobs I do not figure it all by the sqft I figure the lead by % it works for us but not for every one.
 

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I think it's an important and legit question. From the little I've used one I know it's slow. It's supposed to be more effective on thick layers of paint. I posted a link to an article previously that detailed that tool plus the paint shaver and Festool RAS115 & Metabo paint shaver. I think Tom O'Brien wrote it. You should be able to search this site or google it. Good article. It was published in JLC.
I typically figure 10sf/hr for stripping including the follow up sanding but that not with the infrared.
I would never bid that other than T&M.
 

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Yup that's a T/M job if I ever heard one.

No experience with infared, but tried a product the other day you might want to experiment with. Smart strip pro - non toxic environmentally friendly stripper. Spray it on (you need a relatively heavy duty machine) and leave it till the next day. Then pull the paint off. Expensive stuff though at around $350-400 per pail, and won't work on urethanes very effectively. But it'll take on alkyds and acrylics with ease.

We don't have RRP rules here but if we did that'd be one of the first products i'd look at, and i'd still do it T/M.
 

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I think it's an important and legit question. From the little I've used one I know it's slow. It's supposed to be more effective on thick layers of paint. I posted a link to an article previously that detailed that tool plus the paint shaver and Festool RAS115 & Metabo paint shaver. I think Tom O'Brien wrote it. You should be able to search this site or google it. Good article. It was published in JLC.
I typically figure 10sf/hr for stripping including the follow up sanding but that not with the infrared.
I would never bid that other than T&M.
Yep.

In the OP the author was listing quite a few different types of surfaces (windows, eaves, gutters, shutters, doors) on a large brick building. I wasn't trying to be a dick with my first response, only making the point that I think that anyone sitting at their computer reading what he had to say would be hard pressed to give accurate production rate numbers that would truly assist him. In addition, he appears to be unfamiliar with this type of paint removal process. Add these together and you have a scenario where he could really get himself in over his head and lose his ass in the process.

I would completely agree that bidding this T&M would be best. If not that, perhaps enlisting the assistance of another painter with experience in this type of work to assist in bidding and even helping out. Or a third option might be to try and get permission to actually do a few different areas on the building to get a feel for what will be involved. Then he would have a sound basis for working out a bid. Any of these would be better than taking numbers someone here might give him and trying to make them work for what he is facing. Heck, even declining to do a bid at all would be a better option IMO.
 

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