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Sterling Painting LTD
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211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone,

This is my first question here, and I couldn't find another mention of this elsewhere in the forum. When I first started painting way back when I used to work for a company that subcontracted jobs from an insurance company called Canstar. I think they were bought out by Belfor later on. I remember this being a very lucrative arrangement for my boss who would bill hourly to Canstar for seemingly endless work.

Many of the jobs we did were floods and fires and at times the jobs were very small and numerous, other times they were very large such as warehouses etc. The great thing about it for my boss is there was no stingy client to deal with just the insurance company who would pay industry standard rates for good work. I learned how to apply smoke seal and also do minor drywall repair, as we would often have to replace moldy drywall and then insulation, then vapour barrier and then patch/paint.


I guess my question is two fold, has anyone had any experience for this type of work, and also how did you market yourself in this way???

SterlingPainting
 

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Sterling Painting LTD
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211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Phew. thanx Wolfgang the echo in here was deafening! :whistling2:

I guess my question is A) How did you find the work. Was it worth your time and effort?

and B) how did you hook yourself up with those jobs. Did you contact the insurance company personally, or deal with a company that dealt with the insurance company?

I remember having a list of 3 or more jobs to do in one day at times. Such as a small patch in one house or a tiny bit of ceiling texture to do in another. I spent half my time on the road some days.
 

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Sterling Painting LTD
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211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
RCP:

If you do everything yourself from tear out to reinstall at least in Canada the answer is yes. When I was doing Insurance work, we came in after the inspectors and mold guys and demo guys were done. We were just there to "build" and paint. Those driers they use and testers are very expensive, some are worth like 10k. So I imagine if you're a company that does the whole shibang its a diff deal.

I imagine that most companies that do that sort o thing dont also want to do the painting, because finding labour thats skilled also in that department would be difficult, hence the reason they'd hire us.
 

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Paint Store Owner
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5,550 Posts
Most of the "Insurance" work guys that I see do EVERYTHING. Not just painting. Insurance companies are looking for one stop shopping, they dont want to have to cut checks to a bunch of different trades. They like to get estimates, then cut 1 check.

Being certified? I couldn't tell you, I would imagine it couldn't hurt.

Oh, most of the guys I see doing that type of work also have a different company name for that type of work......They all seem to like using the word "Restoration" in their company names :)
 

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Retired Moderator
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10,323 Posts
1. There are companies that specialize in insurance remediation. Some have their own labor force and most farm the work out, so you'll be a sub. ServiceMaster, ServPro, just to name a few. Otherwise, contact the agents and find out who they use for adjusters as some companies do use independent adjusters.

2. To me it was worth the time and effort but then I do more than just painting so I'm able to realize a profit on a good portion of the jobs.

3. Most IC's have dropped mold remediation from their coverages. Usually the only time I have to deal with it is when a damaged house has been sitting for awhile and the mold is caused by the water damage that is covered. I did attend and was certified years ago.

I have been debating doing a thread on Insurance Restoration work, but there's no quick way of writing it all out. And I dont want it to be considered a "definitive bible" on the restoration side of the trade. Rather it would be something that could be used as an informative guide. It would be nice to have some collaboration with other members while doing this. I have had calls and PM's asking about it from members here and I dont mind sharing my experiences concerning it.

If you have any other questions, feel free to ask and I'll try and answer as soon as I can.

Wolf
 

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Senior Member
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6,326 Posts
Do a google search for isurance restoration companies in your area such as,fire & water restoration. Then submit yourself as a service provider to these companies. We do quite a bit but like what has already been said they like you to do more than paint. We handle everything from the insulation in. Drywall,tape,texture,trim,paint,etc...
 

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Banned
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3,297 Posts
1. There are companies that specialize in insurance remediation. Some have their own labor force and most farm the work out, so you'll be a sub. ServiceMaster, ServPro, just to name a few. Otherwise, contact the agents and find out who they use for adjusters as some companies do use independent adjusters.

2. To me it was worth the time and effort but then I do more than just painting so I'm able to realize a profit on a good portion of the jobs.

3. Most IC's have dropped mold remediation from their coverages. Usually the only time I have to deal with it is when a damaged house has been sitting for awhile and the mold is caused by the water damage that is covered. I did attend and was certified years ago.

I have been debating doing a thread on Insurance Restoration work, but there's no quick way of writing it all out. And I dont want it to be considered a "definitive bible" on the restoration side of the trade. Rather it would be something that could be used as an informative guide. It would be nice to have some collaboration with other members while doing this. I have had calls and PM's asking about it from members here and I dont mind sharing my experiences concerning it.

If you have any other questions, feel free to ask and I'll try and answer as soon as I can.

Wolf
Wolf: You are awesome. I appreciate the insight you provide. I say - go ahead and start a generic thread about obtaining and maintaining resto work. Let's see where it goes.
 

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Sterling Painting LTD
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211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah Wolfgang, I think thats a great idea for a thread, although I'm new here and have no clout yet. :whistling2:

Resto work on the maintenance side of things can really keep you going during slow seasons, because calamity is always striking, rain or shine.

I can't tell you how many restaurant kitchen fires, grow ops and basement floods I've done in the dead of winter.:thumbsup:

I remember my boss billed it all out hourly too, so he didn't worry so much
about snapping the whip. If I recall he went to high school with the insurance adjuster though, so they were pretty cozy lol. I will see if if I can contact some insurance adjusters in my area, and I'll keep you all updated on how it works out for me.
 

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Retired Moderator
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10,323 Posts
Yeah Wolfgang, I think thats a great idea for a thread, although I'm new here and have no clout yet. :whistling2:

"Clout" on PT? I dont think any of us have any clout here....and sometimes I wonder about the mods. ;)

Resto work on the maintenance side of things can really keep you going during slow seasons, because calamity is always striking, rain or shine.

I can't tell you how many restaurant kitchen fires, grow ops and basement floods I've done in the dead of winter.:thumbsup:

I remember my boss billed it all out hourly too, so he didn't worry so much
about snapping the whip. If I recall he went to high school with the insurance adjuster though, so they were pretty cozy lol. I will see if if I can contact some insurance adjusters in my area, and I'll keep you all updated on how it works out for me.
Give me a while to put it together as I've got a few things to concentrate on in the upcoming week or so. Hopefully others with resto experience will add to it.
 
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