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@jennifertemple,
This product contains isocyanurates. PDS does not list isocyanates in the ingredients.
It's pretty much the same kind of thing from what I could find on my web searches. All the cautions looked the same and the same PPE is recommended for both BUT there is a lot less to find about isocyanurates as opposed to isocyanates.
Actually, something that surprised me, I found that ALL of the urethane products pose some serious health risks when sprayed. I had no idea until this thread went up and I started reading my way through various websites, data sheers and so on. I, myself, have sprayed many but I won't be spraying them going forward. Just as easy for me to brush on and rub if need be.
 

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It's pretty much the same kind of thing from what I could find on my web searches. All the cautions looked the same and the same PPE is recommended for both BUT there is a lot less to find about isocyanurates as opposed to isocyanates.
Actually, something that surprised me, I found that ALL of the urethane products pose some serious health risks when sprayed. I had no idea until this thread went up and I started reading my way through various websites, data sheers and so on. I, myself, have sprayed many but I won't be spraying them going forward. Just as easy for me to brush on and rub if need be.
please site your sources.
My reading indicates that isocyanurates are acute skin and eye irritants, but are not carcinogenic, like isocyanates.

I don't doubt that they're harmful in some way or another, but I can't find it.
 

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BTW: I don't think I said they were carcinogenic, they can cause eye, skin, liver, kidney and lung damage. Images below are from 2 of the PDFs
Font Rectangle Parallel Circle Number

Font Parallel Screenshot Number Triangle
 

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BTW: I don't think I said they were carcinogenic, they can cause eye, skin, liver, kidney and lung damage.
With all due respect, those do not apply to the product the OP is asking about.


isocyanurates are irritants, but are considered non-hazardous.

The link you provided said the high risk hazard caution is for “sensitization”, which the quote I provided earlier takes the opposite stance, saying that it is not considered a “sensitizer”. Either way, the main risk associated with isocyanurates is either irritation or at worst, sensitization.
 

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With all due respect, those do not apply to the product the OP is asking about.


isocyanurates are irritants, but are considered non-hazardous.

The link you provided said the high risk hazard caution is for “sensitization”, which the quote I provided earlier takes the opposite stance, saying that it is not considered a “sensitizer”. Either way, the main risk associated with isocyanurates is either irritation or at worst, sensitization.
Read through the PDFs.
 

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Sounds pretty nasty to me. One thing to keep in mind is that the water-base stuff will absorb into the skin very easily, which makes it very harmful also..Don't be fooled because it's water-based.
 

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With all due respect, those do not apply to the product the OP is asking about.


isocyanurates are irritants, but are considered non-hazardous.

The link you provided said the high risk hazard caution is for “sensitization”, which the quote I provided earlier takes the opposite stance, saying that it is not considered a “sensitizer”. Either way, the main risk associated with isocyanurates is either irritation or at worst, sensitization.

The following except discusses HDI polyisocyanate induced occupational asthma (HDI isocyanurate is an HDI polyisocyanate) and was cited from the OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HAZARD ASSESSMENT
Air Toxics Hot Spots Program
Hexamethylene Diisocyanate Reference Exposure Levels (Monomer and Polyisocyanates)
Technical Support Document for the Derivation of Noncancer Reference Exposure Levels
Appendix D1 Final
September 2019


“Piirila et al. (2000) conducted a long-term follow-up (mean: 10 yrs) of 245 workers that had been diagnosed with occupational asthma due to HDI, TDI, MDI, or related polyisocyanates. Ninety-six of the 245 asthma cases (39%) were a result of exposure to HDI polyisocyanates. Some workers (15%) reported occasional isocyanate exposure in their current work. Overall, 82% of the workers still experienced symptoms of asthma, 34% used no medication and 35% were on regular medication, suggesting to
the authors that there is a generally poor prognosis for those with isocyanate-induced asthma. Clinical re-examination of 91 workers indicated that FEV1 reduction did not exceed the predicted decline over time in either smoking or nonsmoking patients.
A favorable prognosis for isocyanate respiratory sensitization is more likely for those diagnosed with better lung function, a milder degree of bronchial hyperreactivity, an early reaction (as opposed to a late reaction), and shorter duration of symptoms (Ott et al., 2003). Therefore, it is important that once diisocyanate-related asthma develops, further exposures should be fully avoided.
Chronic overexposure may also cause lung damage resulting in an accelerated loss of lung function that is unrelated to sensitization. This is possibly a result of recurrent exposures to brief irritant levels of HDI polyisocyanates over time. Both sensitization and lung function decrements may be permanent. In rare cases, life-threatening hypersensitivity pneumonitis (also known as extrinsic allergic alveolitis) has been documented in spray painters using HDI polyisocyanate-based paints (Usui et al., 1992; Bieler et al., 2011). Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a restrictive disease affecting the bronchioles and alveoli, whereas asthma is an obstructive respiratory disease usually affecting the bronchi.”
 

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The following except discusses HDI polyisocyanate induced occupational asthma (HDI isocyanurate is an HDI polyisocyanate) and was cited from the OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HAZARD ASSESSMENT
Air Toxics Hot Spots Program
Hexamethylene Diisocyanate Reference Exposure Levels (Monomer and Polyisocyanates)
Technical Support Document for the Derivation of Noncancer Reference Exposure Levels
Appendix D1 Final
September 2019


“Piirila et al. (2000) conducted a long-term follow-up (mean: 10 yrs) of 245 workers that had been diagnosed with occupational asthma due to HDI, TDI, MDI, or related polyisocyanates. Ninety-six of the 245 asthma cases (39%) were a result of exposure to HDI polyisocyanates. Some workers (15%) reported occasional isocyanate exposure in their current work. Overall, 82% of the workers still experienced symptoms of asthma, 34% used no medication and 35% were on regular medication, suggesting to
the authors that there is a generally poor prognosis for those with isocyanate-induced asthma. Clinical re-examination of 91 workers indicated that FEV1 reduction did not exceed the predicted decline over time in either smoking or nonsmoking patients.
A favorable prognosis for isocyanate respiratory sensitization is more likely for those diagnosed with better lung function, a milder degree of bronchial hyperreactivity, an early reaction (as opposed to a late reaction), and shorter duration of symptoms (Ott et al., 2003). Therefore, it is important that once diisocyanate-related asthma develops, further exposures should be fully avoided.
Chronic overexposure may also cause lung damage resulting in an accelerated loss of lung function that is unrelated to sensitization. This is possibly a result of recurrent exposures to brief irritant levels of HDI polyisocyanates over time. Both sensitization and lung function decrements may be permanent. In rare cases, life-threatening hypersensitivity pneumonitis (also known as extrinsic allergic alveolitis) has been documented in spray painters using HDI polyisocyanate-based paints (Usui et al., 1992; Bieler et al., 2011). Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a restrictive disease affecting the bronchioles and alveoli, whereas asthma is an obstructive respiratory disease usually affecting the bronchi.”
 

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The following except discusses HDI polyisocyanate induced occupational asthma (HDI isocyanurate is an HDI polyisocyanate) and was cited from the OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HAZARD ASSESSMENT
Air Toxics Hot Spots Program
Hexamethylene Diisocyanate Reference Exposure Levels (Monomer and Polyisocyanates)
Technical Support Document for the Derivation of Noncancer Reference Exposure Levels
Appendix D1 Final
September 2019


“Piirila et al. (2000) conducted a long-term follow-up (mean: 10 yrs) of 245 workers that had been diagnosed with occupational asthma due to HDI, TDI, MDI, or related polyisocyanates. Ninety-six of the 245 asthma cases (39%) were a result of exposure to HDI polyisocyanates. Some workers (15%) reported occasional isocyanate exposure in their current work. Overall, 82% of the workers still experienced symptoms of asthma, 34% used no medication and 35% were on regular medication, suggesting to
the authors that there is a generally poor prognosis for those with isocyanate-induced asthma. Clinical re-examination of 91 workers indicated that FEV1 reduction did not exceed the predicted decline over time in either smoking or nonsmoking patients.
A favorable prognosis for isocyanate respiratory sensitization is more likely for those diagnosed with better lung function, a milder degree of bronchial hyperreactivity, an early reaction (as opposed to a late reaction), and shorter duration of symptoms (Ott et al., 2003). Therefore, it is important that once diisocyanate-related asthma develops, further exposures should be fully avoided.
Chronic overexposure may also cause lung damage resulting in an accelerated loss of lung function that is unrelated to sensitization. This is possibly a result of recurrent exposures to brief irritant levels of HDI polyisocyanates over time. Both sensitization and lung function decrements may be permanent. In rare cases, life-threatening hypersensitivity pneumonitis (also known as extrinsic allergic alveolitis) has been documented in spray painters using HDI polyisocyanate-based paints (Usui et al., 1992; Bieler et al., 2011). Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a restrictive disease affecting the bronchioles and alveoli, whereas asthma is an obstructive respiratory disease usually affecting the bronchi.”
OP - here is your answer.
 

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I’ve applied hundreds of gallons of a particular 2K clear which utilizes an HDI homopolymer catalyst w/the same CAS # as Centurion’s.

I was a bit puzzled when reading the SDS and comparing it to the manufacturer’s homeowner/consumer literature which painted a very green picture on air quality & home health , especially during the application, stating that occupants don’t need to leave their home during application, also suggesting that the finish is safe for persons with asthma & respiratory issues to inhale during application!

The SDS however stated otherwise, recommending an air fed respirator for spraying and either air-fed respirator or combination charcoal and particulate mask for non-sprayed applications….
 

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I'm not an expert either, but I believe that's correct that the hardener is the part that contains the isocyanate.

I was a little bit surprised to read that it has a high flammability rating, I was under the impression that most water based products had very low fire hazard risk. Would that mean that explosion-proof fans would need to be used?
In theory, yes. In practice, like spraying BIN or Oil (Coverstain), not many go full bore on explosion proof ventilation and static proof spray areas. I do Kitchen Cabinet Refinishing using 1k and 2k from Renner, Milesi, CIC/Centurion, Envirolak etc. Yes, the ISO's are in the hardener's or crosslinkers.
 

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In theory, yes. In practice, like spraying BIN or Oil (Coverstain), not many go full bore on explosion proof ventilation and static proof spray areas. I do Kitchen Cabinet Refinishing using 1k and 2k from Renner, Milesi, CIC/Centurion, Envirolak etc. Yes, the ISO's are in the hardener's or crosslinkers.
Good to know, thanks. On-site are you brushing and rolling the boxes or spraying still?
 

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Sounds pretty nasty to me. One thing to keep in mind is that the water-base stuff will absorb into the skin very easily, which makes it very harmful also..Don't be fooled because it's water-based.
Are you referring to the 2K or just any water based paint in general? An old employer of mine mentioned something to me last summer about standard house paints being harmful on the skin.
I haven't actually searched out any literature on this yet but I'm curious what would come up.
 

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Are you referring to the 2K or just any water based paint in general? An old employer of mine mentioned something to me last summer about standard house paints being harmful on the skin.
I haven't actually searched out any literature on this yet but I'm curious what would come up.
I was mostly referring to the 2k, but let's be honest, there's still lots of nasty stuff in regular paints. I never really wear glove when doing regular painting, but started wearing gloves,hood and safety glasses in the shop when spray painting ,as I've started getting eczema on my hands and eyelids..
 

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I was mostly referring to the 2k, but let's be honest, there's still lots of nasty stuff in regular paints. I never really wear glove when doing regular painting, but started wearing gloves,hood and safety glasses in the shop when spray painting ,as I've started getting eczema on my hands and eyelids..
Probably not a bad idea... That eczema is a bugger, I was born with it. I started wearing finger cots when I get a crack on my fingers, it seems to help out quite a bit. Sort of the same effect as gloves.
 

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Probably not a bad idea... That eczema is a bugger, I was born with it. I started wearing finger cots when I get a crack on my fingers, it seems to help out quite a bit. Sort of the same effect as gloves.
Ya, I never had any "skin problems" until just recently. I'm chalking it up to time spent in the paint booth. Maybe it's the BIN. Or combination of BIN and Beer.:unsure:🤷‍♀️
 
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