Professional Painting Contractors Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am a member of team of students doing a project for my university that involves research for a company. We are trying to understand certain needs of painters. Any feedback on the following 5 questions would be greatly appreciated and may help provide you with better products.

The following questions are regarding your use of joint treatment on typical INTERIOR paint jobs.

1. What is the typical batch size?
• Less than mudpan
• Mudpan
• More than mudpan but less than 5 gallons
• 5 gallon pail or more

2. After mixing, how long does it take you to apply a typical batch?
• 5-20 minutes
• 21-45 minutes
• 46-90 minutes
• Longer than 90 minutes

3. In a typical day, how many batches do you make
• 1
• 2-3
• More than 3

4. When using a setting type (aka ‘Hot Mud’, ‘Easy Sand’) compound, please indicate how often each is setting time is used.
• 5 minutes Rarely 1 2 3 4 5 Very Frequently
• 20 minutes Rarely 1 2 3 4 5 Very Frequently
• 45 minutes Rarely 1 2 3 4 5 Very Frequently
• 90 minutes Rarely 1 2 3 4 5 Very Frequently
• Other : ___ Rarely 1 2 3 4 5 Very Frequently

5. Is having a “ready-mixed” (you don’t have to add water) joint treatment a beneficial when doing interior touch-up prior to painting?

Not at all beneficial 1 2 3 4 5 Extremely beneficial
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,407 Posts
Sometimes university chemists get involved with product development, or manufacturer chemists get involved with universities.

I think the world of mud is about to be revolutionized.
 

·
.
Joined
·
17,820 Posts
Sometimes university chemists get involved with product development, or manufacturer chemists get involved with universities.

I think the world of mud is about to be revolutionized.
I get that, but it seems like a limited study and a limited amount that could be revolutionized. Maybe we are about to see 7 minute mud.

Sadly somebody is paying huge tuition fees for them to study joint compound.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,407 Posts
Alright, I'll spill the beans. This is not going to be received well, just another conspiracy against painters...but...the wallboard manufacturers, in response to the great chinese drywall debacle, have reformulated and are in the process of putting out wallboard with primer pre-applied, which is requiring a mud that is also pre-primed. The technology basically existed already with Tuff-Hide (heavy primer with mud in it, spray on no back roll) and is now being modified for what is essentially a preprimed skim application for screws and joints. One pass, one and done. The rock is now up and primed, and dust free. That is why they are studying the thickness, spread rate and general user patterns of conventional mud. Basically just due diligence.
 

·
.
Joined
·
17,820 Posts
Alright, I'll spill the beans. This is not going to be received well, just another conspiracy against painters...but...the wallboard manufacturers, in response to the great chinese drywall debacle, have reformulated and are in the process of putting out wallboard with primer pre-applied, which is requiring a mud that is also pre-primed. The technology basically existed already with Tuff-Hide (heavy primer with mud in it, spray on no back roll) and is now being modified for what is essentially a preprimed skim application for screws and joints. One pass, one and done. The rock is now up and primed, and dust free. That is why they are studying the thickness, spread rate and general user patterns of conventional mud. Basically just due diligence.
Thanks for entertaining this dullard. That post required me to go mix myself a drink. ;)
 

·
.
Joined
·
17,820 Posts
StudentStudy

While I do appreciate the fact you are in college and that you are enhancing your education to the point that you are not likely to become a painting contractor anytime soon.

I sometimes find myself giving these threads a chance to to stay open long enough to see what the reception from our other members will be. More often than not they are not the most popular.

This site is dedicated to the professionals in the painting field, it is where we can come to unwind and talk shop. You do not seem to meet any of the determined criteria to participate on this board. So I am going to close this thread.

I wish you the best of luck in your studies and in your future.
P.S. there are drywall forums out there that might get a bit more excited to talk about joint compound.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top