Professional Painting Contractors Forum banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Mr. Paint that
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

So, I’ve got an interior job, and among the myriad of things I’m doing in there, from cabinets to walls, I need to paint a sloping ceiling main room, think half a triangle.

The front of the room ceiling is about 9-10 feet and it goes up to 17 or so at the tallest of the slant.

The floors are wood.

I’m very tall. 6 foot 4, so I don’t usually use scaffolding, don’t own any. However I do own lots of ladders, a 22’ extension ladder and a few different A frames and then one of those new hybrid ladders that “do it all”

The floors are wood, well, laminate. They have a texture, hand scraped

The area is quite small where the ceiling gets to its full height as at the one end of the room (tallest end” there is a loft, so I don’t need a ladder I can stand on the loft floor.

It’s just the other two walls that contain the peak and go from 10 foot to 17 foot.

If I do use my ladder, on this hand scraped wood, what should I do to ensure the ladder doesn’t move on me? I’ve never used an extension ladder on such uneven and slippery floors...

Also, there is a Sheetrock ledge halfway up the wall that stick out 2 foot or so for decorative items, like a shelf, tha all along one of the two peak walls, I figure this will make it difficult to even use scaffold as it won’t be able to go up close enough to the wall and I’d be leaning way out to cut in ceiling. not something I want to try.

So, in a nutshell.

- what do you use when working alone on wood floors and an extension ladder to ensure the ladder feet don’t slip out from under you?

Thanks again for all the help y’all have given me over the last year plus since I struck out on my own, you are all a valuable tool that I couldn’t have done this without and I am glad that now I have some experience to be able to contribute more than I used to when I just lurked around sucking up all your knowledge!! Haha
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,998 Posts
Put down Ramboard or some other such floor protection product and make sure it is well affixed to the floor (Gorilla tape works well). Just factor the cost of it (and time to put it down and take it up) into your bid.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
162 Posts
Put down Ramboard or some other such floor protection product and make sure it is well affixed to the floor (Gorilla tape works well). Just factor the cost of it (and time to put it down and take it up) into your bid.
Good good, the thing standing between him and certain death is going to be taped to the ground? That holds?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,454 Posts
Non-slip feet

Hey all,

So, I’ve got an interior job, and among the myriad of things I’m doing in there, from cabinets to walls, I need to paint a sloping ceiling main room, think half a triangle.

The front of the room ceiling is about 9-10 feet and it goes up to 17 or so at the tallest of the slant.

The floors are wood.

I’m very tall. 6 foot 4, so I don’t usually use scaffolding, don’t own any. However I do own lots of ladders, a 22’ extension ladder and a few different A frames and then one of those new hybrid ladders that “do it all”

The floors are wood, well, laminate. They have a texture, hand scraped

The area is quite small where the ceiling gets to its full height as at the one end of the room (tallest end” there is a loft, so I don’t need a ladder I can stand on the loft floor.

It’s just the other two walls that contain the peak and go from 10 foot to 17 foot.

If I do use my ladder, on this hand scraped wood, what should I do to ensure the ladder doesn’t move on me? I’ve never used an extension ladder on such uneven and slippery floors...

Also, there is a Sheetrock ledge halfway up the wall that stick out 2 foot or so for decorative items, like a shelf, tha all along one of the two peak walls, I figure this will make it difficult to even use scaffold as it won’t be able to go up close enough to the wall and I’d be leaning way out to cut in ceiling. not something I want to try.

So, in a nutshell.

- what do you use when working alone on wood floors and an extension ladder to ensure the ladder feet don’t slip out from under you?

Thanks again for all the help y’all have given me over the last year plus since I struck out on my own, you are all a valuable tool that I couldn’t have done this without and I am glad that now I have some experience to be able to contribute more than I used to when I just lurked around sucking up all your knowledge!! Haha
Jimi, have you looked into non-slip feet or covers for your extension ladders?

futtyos
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,998 Posts
Good good, the thing standing between him and certain death is going to be taped to the ground? That holds?
When you cover the whole area with it, as you should, and each section is taped to the floor (each side and end) and then taped to each other where they overlap, yes it will hold - used it and done it many times. But I would only do that if also using scaffolding or if I was worried about using something that, if dropped, would damage the floor.

If I’m just working on extension ladders on wood floors, and don’t feel the need to protect the floor other than from paint, I use sections of the rubber waffle non - skid mats you put under throw rugs for my ladder legs to stand on. Then just put drops down in the area between the ladder and wall to protect from paint as usual. Keeps the ladders secure and protects the floor from getting scratched or dinged by them.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,998 Posts
I will also add I’ve seen guys use Ramboard without securing it down - not something I would care to do. And I did try gluing it down once but it was pretty difficult and messy to get up afterwards. Taping has worked much better.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ridesarize

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,632 Posts
I put a fiver full of water with a lid on it right up against the bottom rung on top of the drops. If you feel the need use two buckets one behind the other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
Someone here suggested carpet padding (with the rubbery side) and I use it on all wood/laminate floors now. It protects the floor without slipping and is cheap. Sometimes the carpet stores will give you odd chunks that you can just move around with your ladder. Probably not durable enough for scaffolding though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,090 Posts
I put my rubber feet directly on the floor, and move my drops around it. I almost had a very bad time with an extension leaned on a beam in the middle of a ceiling like that. The ladder slid just a little bit, and that ladder almost went under the beam. That would have been bad.

DO you guys ever get super ladder paranoia after close calls like that too?

I wonder if theres a rubber footed wheel chock kind of thing that could be jammed under the first rung safely...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,010 Posts
I put my rubber feet directly on the floor, and move my drops around it. I almost had a very bad time with an extension leaned on a beam in the middle of a ceiling like that. The ladder slid just a little bit, and that ladder almost went under the beam. That would have been bad.

DO you guys ever get super ladder paranoia after close calls like that too?

I wonder if theres a rubber footed wheel chock kind of thing that could be jammed under the first rung safely...
I slid down the wall in my bosses entry about 15 yrs ago, bailed onto the stairwell bucket and brush in hand. Scared the crap outta me. That's when I learned about rubber mats. And surprisingly didn't spill a drop!

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
I put my rubber feet directly on the floor, and move my drops around it. I almost had a very bad time with an extension leaned on a beam in the middle of a ceiling like that. The ladder slid just a little bit, and that ladder almost went under the beam. That would have been bad.

DO you guys ever get super ladder paranoia after close calls like that too?

I wonder if theres a rubber footed wheel chock kind of thing that could be jammed under the first rung safely...
Yes I have a tool that does that. Rubber footed and everything
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
Ramboard, secured as usual, is the absolute best way. But, a good 4' wide floor paper will do the trick very well too. Just secure it with 1.5" blue tape, clean floor of dust first. A 4'×500' roll of floor paper is $24 at Miller Paint.

There's two options, 3rd option is Butyl drop clothes. They grip pretty darn good, use tape to hold for insurance. I just bought 10 butyl drops on sale at Miller Paint, great prices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,829 Posts
Egg crate mattress pads cut into 1' x1' squares and put under ladder feet make great non-slip devices. They protect better than non-slip rug liners and are more non-slip than carpet padding.
 

·
Super Moderator
Journeyman Painting Contractor
Joined
·
2,704 Posts
Most importantly, make sure your ladder is at the right angle. 1 to 4 rule. 1 ft. out for every 4 ft. up. Scientifically it shouldn't slide if it's on the right angle anyhow. I climb up 20 ft ladders right on hardwood all the time with no problems. .I do like the the non slip matt idea though..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,829 Posts
Most importantly, make sure your ladder is at the right angle. 1 to 4 rule. 1 ft. out for every 4 ft. up. Scientifically it shouldn't slide if it's on the right angle anyhow. I climb up 20 ft ladders right on hardwood all the time with no problems. .I do like the the non slip matt idea though..
If you are referring to the laws of physics, this assumes no outside forces (such as the weight of and movement of the painter on the ladder) acting upon the ladder. Add an outside force and a slip is possible regardless of ladder angle.

If you never had a ladder slip on a hardwood floor without providing any slip mitigation measures you are either very lucky or haven't been doing it long enough.
 

·
Super Moderator
Journeyman Painting Contractor
Joined
·
2,704 Posts
If you are referring to the laws of physics, this assumes no outside forces (such as the weight of and movement of the painter on the ladder) acting upon the ladder. Add an outside force and a slip is possible regardless of ladder angle.

If you never had a ladder slip on a hardwood floor without providing any slip mitigation measures you are either very lucky or haven't been doing it long enough.
Been in the game for over 25 years with no ladder incidences. (Thank gawd)I've seen a lot of people have thier ladder on some really unsafe angles. I thought maybe pointing out the old 1/4 rule would be a good idea.
If I'm up really high on a slimy deck or roof or something, I'll nail 2x4s down or tie off the ladder if possible. I don't usually have trouble on hardwood though as the rubber shoes are usually grippy enough..but I agree that extra prevention is a good idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,829 Posts
Been in the game for over 25 years with no ladder incidences. (Thank gawd)I've seen a lot of people have thier ladder on some really unsafe angles. I thought maybe pointing out the old 1/4 rule would be a good idea.
Sounds like you've been lucky......and careful. The 1/4 rule is always a good idea (as is slip mitigation on hardwood). Stay safe, good luck, and good painting.
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top