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FasterBetterCheaper
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I posted this before, but I feel the need to share with my cyber buddies: stay safe! This was in 2017. 15 feet in stairway: marble floor.

Please read what's next: all the years (almost 40) I trained for this fall: I would get to the top, ask myself, "Self, " if the ladder goes like this, where will I jump... Like that... etc... I did this hundreds of times.
The time I fell it worked: I turned, picked a spot and landed on my feet (then the ladder fell on me... a 24.. with 5 gal. bucket and roller only 1.5 gal paint).
So do this drill: where will I jump, what will I do. It works. Stay safe
 

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Yep, and also important; where don’t you want to land?
 

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I posted this before, but I feel the need to share with my cyber buddies: stay safe! This was in 2017. 15 feet in stairway: marble floor.

Please read what's next: all the years (almost 40) I trained for this fall: I would get to the top, ask myself, "Self, " if the ladder goes like this, where will I jump... Like that... etc... I did this hundreds of times.
The time I fell it worked: I turned, picked a spot and landed on my feet (then the ladder fell on me... a 24.. with 5 gal. bucket and roller only 1.5 gal paint).
So do this drill: where will I jump, what will I do. It works. Stay safe

I believe the OSHA regulations state that not only are you supposed to use a 4:1 ratio when placing a ladder, extending the ladder three feet above edge of roof, and always keeping at least a two point contact, but also to tie the ladder off. The more I follow the regs. the less I have to think about where to jump.
 

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I posted this before, but I feel the need to share with my cyber buddies: stay safe! This was in 2017. 15 feet in stairway: marble floor.

Please read what's next: all the years (almost 40) I trained for this fall: I would get to the top, ask myself, "Self, " if the ladder goes like this, where will I jump... Like that... etc... I did this hundreds of times.
The time I fell it worked: I turned, picked a spot and landed on my feet (then the ladder fell on me... a 24.. with 5 gal. bucket and roller only 1.5 gal paint).
So do this drill: where will I jump, what will I do. It works. Stay safe
good idea!
Im big on ladder safety. One can never be too careful.
 

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I believe the OSHA regulations state that not only are you supposed to use a 4:1 ratio when placing a ladder, extending the ladder three feet above edge of roof, and always keeping at least a two point contact, but also to tie the ladder off. The more I follow the regs. the less I have to think about where to jump.
Good reminders!
I try to maintain at least three points of contact at all times, when possible (like climbers do).
 

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problem with your safety regulations from osha is he was inside, can't go above the roof and no where to tie ladder too.

They're not my safety regulations. I'm just obligated to follow them or face a fine. Just like you. And as far as interior access, if you have to think about where to jump, maybe you're using the wrong equipment.
 

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I never understood the 3' or 3 rungs above the gutter line. I think climbing "around" a ladder especially on a metal gutter is more dangerous than placing at most 18" above the gutter and simply walking over the top rung onto the roof.


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In 40 years, I've had about 5 falls from ladders and survived, barely. It's always the time that you least expect it. Your guard is down, you're in a groove......my worst 2 falls were off those little 2 ft stepladders. On one, I forgot and stepped down on the BACKSIDE of the ladder and crashed to the floor, the other, I had drop cloths down covering some open vent holes in the floor. I forgot about the holes and of course set my ladder right in one in a hurry to finish a bathroom. Narrowly missed smashing a brand new soaker tub.
 

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In 40 years, I've had about 5 falls from ladders and survived, barely. It's always the time that you least expect it. Your guard is down, you're in a groove......my worst 2 falls were off those little 2 ft stepladders. On one, I forgot and stepped down on the BACKSIDE of the ladder and crashed to the floor, the other, I had drop cloths down covering some open vent holes in the floor. I forgot about the holes and of course set my ladder right in one in a hurry to finish a bathroom. Narrowly missed smashing a brand new soaker tub.
I've read a few times that most deaths/injuries happen from step ladders. Obviously 6' ladders are more commonly used in construction and by everyone else so there are more chances but also, people get more complacent at that height than they would on an extension ladder. Several times I've been up and down a six all day and then borrowed an 8' and muscle memory has you stepping down like you're still on a six. Not deadly but great way to break/sprain an ankle. In commercial work, electricians standing on the not-a-step of a 12' step-ladder always makes me cringe. They are at the mercy of every clumsy day-laborer coming down a hall with a trash cart. I couldn't do that.

I'm not a lover of heights so I want it to be as safe as possible for everyone. We'd have to get up on canopies of warehouses and some guys would act like that ladder is costing money by the foot and refuse to extend 3' above the canopy. A couple got mad when I extended the ladder. Made no sense not to. Maybe they were suicidal? Or worse- homicidal? We're not talking tough or brave guys either just crazy I guess.
 

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I've read a few times that most deaths/injuries happen from step ladders. Obviously 6' ladders are more commonly used in construction and by everyone else so there are more chances but also, people get more complacent at that height than they would on an extension ladder. Several times I've been up and down a six all day and then borrowed an 8' and muscle memory has you stepping down like you're still on a six. Not deadly but great way to break/sprain an ankle. In commercial work, electricians standing on the not-a-step of a 12' step-ladder always makes me cringe. They are at the mercy of every clumsy day-laborer coming down a hall with a trash cart. I couldn't do that.

I'm not a lover of heights so I want it to be as safe as possible for everyone. We'd have to get up on canopies of warehouses and some guys would act like that ladder is costing money by the foot and refuse to extend 3' above the canopy. A couple got mad when I extended the ladder. Made no sense not to. Maybe they were suicidal? Or worse- homicidal? We're not talking tough or brave guys either just crazy I guess.
Most painter's I've worked with were crazy and or f-in stupid!
 

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I’d bet that more deaths happen from step ladders because they happen so fast that you don’t have enough time to react to the fall. Plus you’re more likely to be working over hard surfaces compared to extension ladders.

My dumbest ladder moves are always when I’m spraying exteriors. Gotta keep that edge wet.
 

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I’d bet that more deaths happen from step ladders because they happen so fast that you don’t have enough time to react to the fall. Plus you’re more likely to be working over hard surfaces compared to extension ladders.

My dumbest ladder moves are always when I’m spraying exteriors. Gotta keep that edge wet.

In just about every ladder safety training I've had to attend, and continue to attend, the instructor will quote statistics that show that more ladder related job injuries resulted from step ladders 4 ft. and under.
 

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In just about every ladder safety training I've had to attend, and continue to attend, the instructor will quote statistics that show that more ladder related job injuries resulted from step ladders 4 ft. and under.
Likely due to complacency and the feeling that nothing serious is likely to happen at that height. Also, I bet more people tend to stand on the top platform of a 4 footer than any other size. Sort of a, “What’s the worse that could happen?”, mentality.
 
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Probably a lot of injuries come from tools being dropped from the guy on the ladder. Years ago I worked for a company traveling around redoing marriot hotels, All the tapers were using these aluminum adjustable stilts that strapped to their legs. I think they went from 1' to 3' feet. It was crazy they could run up and down the corridors they looked like an accident waiting to happen, I would have to think they are not OSHA approved. I have never seen anybody with them on a jobsite in California or even for sale for that matter
 

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In just about every ladder safety training I've had to attend, and continue to attend, the instructor will quote statistics that show that more ladder related job injuries resulted from step ladders 4 ft. and under.
Every Tool Box Safety Talk I never had was about "ladder safety". Our superintendent would show up on the job, have us sign a sheet and tell us we had a safety meeting and it "was about ladder safety". It was always "Ladder Safety". However, the safety inspectors sent out by the insurance companies would sometimes field test us. If there was a ladder nearby, they'd ask me to get on it as if I were going to cut in and see how many rungs up I'd go- stuff like that. And they'd take pictures if you were doing something right, wrong, or if you were just good looking I suspect. One time the most notoriously persnickety of all the inspectors gave a safety talk about "How to drive in snow"! This was down south, damn near to Mississippi. Me and another guy from Chicago had to correct practically everything he said. These guys could all write you up but the write-ups carried no teeth. Only the one guy was always a male appendage about it, the others were happy to see things being done safely.
 

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Probably a lot of injuries come from tools being dropped from the guy on the ladder. Years ago I worked for a company traveling around redoing marriot hotels, All the tapers were using these aluminum adjustable stilts that strapped to their legs. I think they went from 1' to 3' feet. It was crazy they could run up and down the corridors they looked like an accident waiting to happen, I would have to think they are not OSHA approved. I have never seen anybody with them on a jobsite in California or even for sale for that matter
Pretty certain that’s where the old superstition about it being bad luck to walk under a ladder came from. People who did so were more likely to get clunked on the noggin.
 
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