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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Did a search and it seems like the most recent thread on this topic is 6-7 years old so I figured I'd start a new one.


We're about to start a decent sized interior trim/wall repaint, trim is oil. The house is a relatively empty remodel so we're going to spray the trim. Just curious what are your guys' method for converting oil to latex on trim. Most of the time when I'm painting latex over oil trim it's a brush and roll deal, but with spraying Im a little more wary of a bad reaction. I was thinking a scuff sand with 220 and vacuum, top coat w scuff x. Think it's worth it to prime before top coat?
 

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IDK if Id quite trust scuffX over oil. Durapoxy from Kelly Moore definitely sticks to oil. I believe Cabinet coat will stick to oil as well.
 

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There's another recent thread about water-based primers that adhere to oil. It's floating around somewhere. In it, is the list of MPI approved primers for going over oil.
 

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Did a search and it seems like the most recent thread on this topic is 6-7 years old so I figured I'd start a new one.


We're about to start a decent sized interior trim/wall repaint, trim is oil. The house is a relatively empty remodel so we're going to spray the trim. Just curious what are your guys' method for converting oil to latex on trim. Most of the time when I'm painting latex over oil trim it's a brush and roll deal, but with spraying Im a little more wary of a bad reaction. I was thinking a scuff sand with 220 and vacuum, top coat w scuff x. Think it's worth it to prime before top coat?
Just went through the same thing...

We used 123, which is readily available and is on “the list”. We used this because there was no risk of tannin bleed, and it sprays and levels so nice. What about smart prime?

Scuffed with 180. Felt that 220 didn’t leave enough tooth.

Cleaned with Crud Cutter. *It might be worth noting that Zinsser recommended Crud Cutter as the preferred cleaner/degreaser, and strongly advised against a few products, such as phosphate-free Liquid TSP. Guessing each manufacturer has a list of do’s and dont’s.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Just went through the same thing...

We used 123, which is readily available and is on “the list”. We used this because there was no risk of tannin bleed, and it sprays and levels so nice. What about smart prime?

Scuffed with 180. Felt that 220 didn’t leave enough tooth.

Cleaned with Crud Cutter. *It might be worth noting that Zinsser recommended Crud Cutter as the preferred cleaner/degreaser, and strongly advised against a few products, such as phosphate-free Liquid TSP. Guessing each manufacturer has a list of do’s and dont’s.

Good deal, thanks. Yeah im thinking since we're spraying it's not all that much extra work to add a prime coat as everything will be masked already.

Good to know about the paper, ill bring plenty of 180.

Good to know about the cleaner too. Id hate to spend time cleaning and in fact be making the situation worse. Ive been using the jasco no- rinse degreaser for the very reason that i dont trust my cleaning skills. Ill check and i see if thats compatible with the smart prime.

Thanks for all the info!
 

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Good deal, thanks. Yeah im thinking since we're spraying it's not all that much extra work to add a prime coat as everything will be masked already.

Good to know about the paper, ill bring plenty of 180.

Good to know about the cleaner too. Id hate to spend time cleaning and in fact be making the situation worse. Ive been using the jasco no- rinse degreaser for the very reason that i dont trust my cleaning skills. Ill check and i see if thats compatible with the smart prime.

Thanks for all the info!
dirtex is typically what I spec, very economical too.
 

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Currently re coating a bunch of satin impervo oil at my own house and all I’m doing is cleaning good with dirtex. That stuff is so useful and easy


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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And due to climate here it is vital to create favorable conditions for the paint to stick well and not come off very soon. So it is better to consult with the specialists locally to find the best way of painting. Besides, every paint has its only use instructions. Read them well before painting.
 

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Did a search and it seems like the most recent thread on this topic is 6-7 years old so I figured I'd start a new one.


We're about to start a decent sized interior trim/wall repaint, trim is oil. The house is a relatively empty remodel so we're going to spray the trim. Just curious what are your guys' method for converting oil to latex on trim. Most of the time when I'm painting latex over oil trim it's a brush and roll deal, but with spraying Im a little more wary of a bad reaction. I was thinking a scuff sand with 220 and vacuum, top coat w scuff x. Think it's worth it to prime before top coat?
I always use a quick scuff and then extreme bond primer. Of course, I generally topcoat with either scuff x or pro classic waterborne enamel
 

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Did a search and it seems like the most recent thread on this topic is 6-7 years old so I figured I'd start a new one.


We're about to start a decent sized interior trim/wall repaint, trim is oil. The house is a relatively empty remodel so we're going to spray the trim. Just curious what are your guys' method for converting oil to latex on trim. Most of the time when I'm painting latex over oil trim it's a brush and roll deal, but with spraying Im a little more wary of a bad reaction. I was thinking a scuff sand with 220 and vacuum, top coat w scuff x. Think it's worth it to prime before top coat?
 

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Thats a lot of work, and adding to it you have to tack rag. I would do none of that what you have listed. I would make sure surface is clean. Use XIM high adhesion primer for 1st coat and than your finish coats enough to cover if this is a blow and go. Eliminate all that hand work. I have done this works great. DO NOT GET XIM ON POROUS FLOOR SURFACES LIKE POROUS TILES! It makes divots. Usually if I drop a drip with latex I let it dry and scrape it off (don't wipe it as we all know only makes it worse). Does not work with XIM you need to wipe immediately on porous surfaces if you drip. When I do cabinets I XIM two coats over lacquer and works AWESOME! Hope that helps next time I see ya u owe me a beer! :) https://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/consumer-brands/xim/bonders/advanced-technology-uma-white
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Not sure scuff sand and vacuuming is really that much hand work, maybe couple minutes per window. If there's ever a problem I'd hate to tell them I didn't even bother scuffing.

I've heard good things about that xim bonding primer though, my store has it but I haven't used it. Ever have tannin bleed problems with that stuff or does it seal it?

Why do you use two primer coats on lacquered cabinets? Seems like a lot of extra work;)
 
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