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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for advice. I am repainting a cinder block locker room that is currently painted with a semi gloss oil based paint.

Assuming I need to use a liquid sander or deglosser and assuming I need to prime. Athletic Director wants the paint to be very durable and washable, as it is a high school locker room. What primer and paint would you use? Am I overthinking? Players will be in the locker room the next day, so I don't want any smells.

Thanks!
 

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Forget the deglossers. They cause you more headaches IMO. I would use an orbital to aggressively scuff sand the surface. Wipe down all the dust. Apply a bonding primer such as Zinsser 123. It's specifically designed to bond to glossy surfaces. As for topcoats, I don't know of any with low odor that would fit your needs. SW makes a nice, shiny latex epoxy in semi gloss, but it has a very strong odor. I'm sure others will chime in shortly.
 

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Looking for advice. I am repainting a cinder block locker room that is currently painted with a semi gloss oil based paint.

Assuming I need to use a liquid sander or deglosser and assuming I need to prime. Athletic Director wants the paint to be very durable and washable, as it is a high school locker room. What primer and paint would you use? Am I overthinking? Players will be in the locker room the next day, so I don't want any smells.

Thanks!
If it's an oil paint, then yes proper bonding is your biggest issue. I would make sure to
Give it a good wash with An Eco TSP.
A light poles sand is probably a good idea, but I would prime with INSLX Stix.
After that, I think any mid grade semigloss latex paint should be fine.
Maybe this word be a good spot for BM Scuffx.
 

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Durapoxy from Kelly Moore is another good option. Hard as a rock, and sticks to most anything. If you can get the surface properly sanded, it should adhere without a primer. Although, with this project, you should probably use a bonding primer anyway.

Scruffy pads would probably be the best way to scuff the surface in this case. Pole sanders arent gonna work too well on cinder blocks.
 

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Deglossers used in this manner are just going to get the surface clean and slightly etched when using an abrasive pad. I would suggest clean with dirtex or tsp substitute and medium grit scotch bright pad. Rinse and prime with a bonding primer like stix. ScuffX has my vote. Single compenet, easy to touch up and fast curing.
 

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I’m with Woodco and Cocomonkeynuts on the scuffy pads/scotchbrite pads. I’ve had good success dry scuffing uneven surfaces by attaching 3-M maroon pads to hook and loop r/o & orbital sanders. It’s both fast and thorough. I use them a lot on the Rotex RTS 400 EQ orbital sanders.

They also work really well on the Festool handheld hook & loop sanding blocks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Thank you for all of the advice! I wasn't expecting even one response!

I think what I am going to do is scrub it with Krud Kutter deglosser that says I can prime in 10 min no rinse using a scotch bright abrasive pad and then prime with water based 123 and then paint with SW SuperPaint semi gloss. I have to admit the smell of pre cat wb scares me. I think anything semi gloss is going to hold up, right? It isn't like it's a factory that is getting bumped and scraped all the time.

Anyone think this is a majorly bad plan?

Everyone's help has been very very much appreciated! Thank you!
 

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high moisture area? BC good luck with a single component anything if it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
high moisture area? BC good luck with a single component anything if it is.
It isn't the shower area or the bathroom area, it is the area with the lockers. There is a walk through to the showers, but it isn't the same area. Does that change your thoughts, or no? Thanks!
 

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123 isn't really a bonding primer but will adhere fine to a properly prepped surface. Seems like a lot of prep work just to give a mediocre topcoat though. I would definitely consider something more durable than superpaint. ScuffX has very little odor and can be put into use next day. Out performs many of the 2K waterborne epoxys.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
After further thought, I have decided to use krud kutter with a scrub pad, and then prime it with 123 or gripper, I know stix is better, but I need this done in one day. And then I am going to paint it with SW Pro Industrial Waterbased Alkyd Urethane bc I am told it doesn't smell. Anybody use it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Forget the deglossers. They cause you more headaches IMO. I would use an orbital to aggressively scuff sand the surface. Wipe down all the dust. Apply a bonding primer such as Zinsser 123. It's specifically designed to bond to glossy surfaces. As for topcoats, I don't know of any with low odor that would fit your needs. SW makes a nice, shiny latex epoxy in semi gloss, but it has a very strong odor. I'm sure others will chime in shortly.
Have you ever used Pro Industrial Waterbased Alkyd Urethane? Smell less? Any other thoughts, if you have used it?
 

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SW Pro Industrial waterboure urethane alkyd as far as smell is not bad however I have not used it on anything except trim and shelves. It does take it awhile to cure, about a month to reach full hardness. I do not believe I would consider it for the locker room but that is sorta out of my wheelhouse. Also the semi gloss is about like a satin.
 

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Have you ever used Pro Industrial Waterbased Alkyd Urethane? Smell less? Any other thoughts, if you have used it?
No, IndyPainter, I have NOT used that product. My guess is that it would smell pretty bad. I think you're going to have a hard time finding a product that will be of industrial/high use quality without the smell. Even most of SW's low VOC paints still have an odor and still have fumes. I know some paint mfr's make paints for hospital settings. That might be an option.
 

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Ok, I'll bite.
Why cant you just use a palm sander and/or pole sander and scuff the crap out of it then drive right over it with scuffx or even an exterior product such as duration (which is very tenatious). I'm trying to figure out why we're priming when there are many great products available that'll bite into block so long as its clean, dry and dull.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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If it's like any high school gym locker room ive ever been in, im guessing it smells like a arm-pit mixed with a taint. Janitors like to clean these areas with all types of harsh chemicals to get rid of that BO smell. I ve never used Scuff X, but i know it is LATEX. Latex paint is probably not the best option for this type of area, seeing how someone already painted it with oil semi-gloss. Pro-Industrial Urethane has no smell, but i wouldn't try it out on this project. Im going to go with Pacman on this. use an epoxy somthing.. the sherwin williams one you mentioned will be fine. Might be better out there, but you were going to use superpaint, so this will be miles better than what you would have produced.
 

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Ok, I'll bite.
Why cant you just use a palm sander and/or pole sander and scuff the crap out of it then drive right over it with scuffx or even an exterior product such as duration (which is very tenatious). I'm trying to figure out why we're priming when there are many great products available that'll bite into block so long as its clean, dry and dull.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
Cinder blocks are too uneven for a pole sander.
 

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Honestly, I'm @lilpaintchic. I do locker rooms constantly, and there's no reason to go so far. A very light sand down is more than needed and then just hit it with a precat epoxy from SW or whoever. Ive gone back to locker rooms we've done a decade ago with no problems. Hell, half the time, that's all they spec for. For one thing, being brick alone gives you a mechanical adhesion advantage, then a light scuff down gives you abrasion and something like precat epoxy should give you chemical adhesion, so you've essentially hit all 3 of the main aspects of adhesion.

Now, if you really want to make it stick, you could do a 2 part system like we use a lot. I'm a big fan of PPGs Aquapon which is incredible for a water based system. Stinks a bit initially but the smell clears out after say an hour or so. No priming required and no abrasion required.
 
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