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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a shot in the dark. I look at a job for which the home owners want the new kitchen window, which is pine to look similar to the clear coated alder.
Hoping that someone might have done this before and can advise on how to get this look.

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I know Pine with golden oak, looks the same as Alder with just a clear coat.., if that helps.

I think it was golden oak anyway.... It was a long time ago.... I did a huge job with staining pine windows, and clearing the the alder, and they matched, with one of the common stock colors.
 

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If you can get a piece of the existing alder from somewhere else in the house, maybe a piece of base from a hidden area and then get a piece of clear pine in color as possible to the new window and have stain matched to the alder on it. The pine used on windows is better and often a veneer, than the pine from a lumber yard. You might have to go to the trim carpenter who installed the window to get a piece of sample wood.There is a variety of pine called radiata that is similar to a lot of wood used in new windows, you might try finding some of that to play with. Home depot around here sells it. If not it's a roll of the dice with whatever pre packaged stain you can find. You need to condition alder.
 

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If you can get a piece of the existing alder from somewhere else in the house, maybe a piece of base from a hidden area and then get a piece of clear pine in color as possible to the new window and have stain matched to the alder on it. The pine used on windows is better and often a veneer, than the pine from a lumber yard. You might have to go to the trim carpenter who installed the window to get a piece of sample wood.There is a variety of pine called radiata that is similar to a lot of wood used in new windows, you might try finding some of that to play with. Home depot around here sells it. If not it's a roll of the dice with whatever pre packaged stain you can find. You need to condition alder.

Depends on which stain you are using. Lenmar alkyd stain does not need a conditioner on alder, and in fact using daly's benite under it will create a more varied appearance which can also be desirable.
 

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My gawd. It will never look exact, but if you use a similar product it's not exactly going to stick out like a sore thumb either. I'd say to the client, it is what it is..And I'll do my best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you can get a piece of the existing alder from somewhere else in the house, maybe a piece of base from a hidden area and then get a piece of clear pine in color as possible to the new window and have stain matched to the alder on it. The pine used on windows is better and often a veneer, than the pine from a lumber yard. You might have to go to the trim carpenter who installed the window to get a piece of sample wood.There is a variety of pine called radiata that is similar to a lot of wood used in new windows, you might try finding some of that to play with. Home depot around here sells it. If not it's a roll of the dice with whatever pre packaged stain you can find. You need to condition alder.
Thanks about info on the pine. I did not know that it is usually different. The Adler is already coated with some kind of poly. And, it seemed to have a grayish color to it.

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My gawd. It will never look exact, but if you use a similar product it's not exactly going to stick out like a sore thumb either. I'd say to the client, it is what it is..And I'll do my best.
Exactly. Don’t ever promise a customer a dead on match. If you do achieve it, great. Take the credit but deep down realize that luck, more than skill, likely had much to do with it. :wink:

I always tell customers that close is a winner in these things. Hell, two pieces of the same wood type will stain out differently. Just explain wood is wood and that if they want a consistent look, to have you paint it. If they seem like they aren’t going to accept that, then excuse yourself early on and avoid some headaches and frustration.

Oh, and if you do take it on, always charge T&M. These jobs can become endless rabbit holes at times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Exactly. Don’t ever promise a customer a dead on match. If you do achieve it, great. Take the credit but deep down realize that luck, more than skill, likely had much to do with it. :wink:

I always tell customers that close is a winner in these things. Hell, two pieces of the same wood type will stain out differently. Just explain wood is wood and that if they want a consistent look, to have you paint it. If they seem like they aren’t going to accept that, then excuse yourself early on and avoid some headaches and frustration.

Oh, and if you do take it on, always charge T&M. These jobs can become endless rabbit holes at times.
In the estimate I am sending them. I am giving them 2 prices. One price is for the actual application of the stain and poly. The other price is T&M for going through the process of finding a good match. I am also telling them that this is not something that I do a lot of and that nothing will actually be put on the trim until a sample is approved by them.

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
First is pine with fruitwood, second is alder clear coated.
Thanks @Woodco! I thought that the Adler I looked at was grayish. But the kitchen was dark and I only gave it a quick look. If they hire me I will be a better look and try the fuitwood stain if their Adler looks like the one in the image.

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Well you have the advantage of similar grain pattern & pore size on both woods + the fact they’re both rather soft.

I second the advice that you tell ur client a match job can never be guaranteed & that its got a lot to do with luck of the draw (especially when matching woods).

Other than that my recommendations are:
-condition it before staining/glazing to avoid the horrid blocking pine can have.
-Use a penetrating stain thats 1-2 shades darker than what you want it to be when done. If they’re asking for the reddish knotty alder type finish-Possibly american walnut?
Penetrating stains are made w/ aniline dyes instead of pigments & less solids & driers so it gives you more leeway to wipe back & achieve the final tone in layers instead of going full bore.
-If you want to apply additional layers of stain color over the penetrating stain, seal it with a thin coat of shellac first so it doesn’t wipe away your existing tone.
-Use a well worn chip brush & drag it through the top few layers of stain or glaze to get the straight grain pattern.
 

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This is a shot in the dark. I look at a job for which the home owners want the new kitchen window, which is pine to look similar to the clear coated alder.
Hoping that someone might have done this before and can advise on how to get this look.

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Most paint stores offer the courtesy of custom-color matching stains.
As previously suggested try to get a sample of both woods to give to your paint store.

You can also experiment with sanding sealer vs. no sanding sealer, and leaving stain on for longer/shorter time before wiping and/or with multiple coats of stain.Multiple coats of stain darkens the color (obviously) but it also hides the grain more, so this is useful sometimes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Another thought/question- do u have a relationship or know of a good faux finisher in your area that could help?
I believe that we do, but I have never (as far as I know) met the person. And since I have not heard a peep from the home owner since I sent the estimate all of this info might be moot...unless I get another customer that want the same thing done.

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For matching pine to alder I’d probably use a lightfast water aniline dye.
I always keep a bunch of powder dye packets on hand for color matching. A 1 oz dye packet will typically yield up to a qt of dye. They end up costing me ~ $3/pack unlike the $11+ that most retailers are charging. Great for most softwoods because they rarely blotch. Gotta be careful with lightfastness when working with dyes, making certain to use the correct dye for surfaces subjected to UV light such as windows.
 

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Hell, two pieces of the same wood type will stain out differently.
I just did a run of treads and risers in black cherry. The look was consistent right up to the OLD oak bull nose at the 2nd floor. A hundred years of drying made it really thirsty. I wiped on and instantly wiped off and I still had to sand a bit of the stain back, it was 2-3 times the depth of color to the new wood! I never got it really close. (It looks OK now but there is a clear difference)
 

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For matching pine to alder I’d probably use a lightfast water aniline dye.
I always keep a bunch of powder dye packets on hand for color matching. A 1 oz dye packet will typically yield up to a qt of dye. They end up costing me ~ $3/pack unlike the $11+ that most retailers are charging. Great for most softwoods because they rarely blotch. Gotta be careful with lightfastness when working with dyes, making certain to use the correct dye for surfaces subjected to UV light such as windows.
What is your source for buying these packets at $3/?
 

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What is your source for buying these packets at $3/?
Picked them up at the manufacturer in Manhattan, W.D. Lockwood...they don’t have online ordering. I purchased 35 for $158 plus they threw in an additional dozen of their newer colors. It worked out to $3.36 per packet for the 47. I’m “guessing” they probably retail for $4.50 or more purchasing directly from WD.

They charge me roughly $28/#, the pounds coming in metal qt cans. 1# yields 4-8 gallons.

They do blotch on softwoods to some degree but not nearly as much as with pigmented oil stains. For a light color on pine to match Alder they’d likely be fine, eliminating any pre-treatment/conditioning. There are several different methods to condition the wood when using dyes...I’ve only found the need to do that with the oil anilines.
 

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I believe that we do, but I have never (as far as I know) met the person. And since I have not heard a peep from the home owner since I sent the estimate all of this info might be moot...unless I get another customer that want the same thing done.

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Sometimes the best job is the one you didn't get.
 
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