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The tint guys at my Campbell supplier are really good. I have a Woodsong II stain that matches aged wood like that really well. I had a customer whose cabinets where in bad shape but wanted the color the same. I took a door to them and had them match the color. We stripped them and stained them the aged color. It wasn't a very satisfying job because the cabinets looked exactly the same except shiny with a nice finish, but the customer loved it. That was a year or two ago. We are in the middle of a similar job. These cabinets were in much better shape, so we were just clear coating them, but a couple doors ended up needing color match touch ups. I pulled that stain out and they blended in great. I love that Woodsong II stain. It is a spray and wipe stain that is super easy to work with. Dries fast, but not so fast that you can't work with it. I believe a solvent clear can go over it in under an hour, but we use water base topcoats, so we have to wait 2 hours before top coating, which is still pretty dang fast.
 

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it provides the same look as oil polyurethane as far as the 'ambering' opposed to clear water based polyurethanes, ie it just makes the wood look wet. 1-5% nitric acid will provide the oxidized look that is difficult to achieve via dyes or pigments
Absolutely correct, an alkyd always has ambling qualities vs a non yellowing acrylic. take a styrofoam cup to you paint supplier, ask if they would add half ounce of yellow oxide or GX a clean yellow. take a small amount of your varnish or shellac and use a very small amount and add it to the varnish/shellac, it would definitely yellow the finish. Also works with rex oxide if you want to strengthen the cherry appearance or a little yellow with the red will give it a maple like appearance. At SW, you must use the BAC colorants, not the CCE. Genex I believe is still universal for latex or alkyds. Definitely works with varnish, I never worked with a shellac as in the old days there was white or amber shellac manufactured by Hausers. Have a good day. Another old painters trick was to use a fast dry varnish and add a pint to the alkyd paint. Accelerates the drying and creates a beautiful depth of finish to the alkyd. Use on hand railings as a door would show a blotchy appearance over the larger area.
 

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Absolutely correct, an alkyd always has ambling qualities vs a non yellowing acrylic. take a styrofoam cup to you paint supplier, ask if they would add half ounce of yellow oxide or GX a clean yellow. take a small amount of your varnish or shellac and use a very small amount and add it to the varnish/shellac, it would definitely yellow the finish. Also works with rex oxide if you want to strengthen the cherry appearance or a little yellow with the red will give it a maple like appearance. At SW, you must use the BAC colorants, not the CCE. Genex I believe is still universal for latex or alkyds. Definitely works with varnish, I never worked with a shellac as in the old days there was white or amber shellac manufactured by Hausers. Have a good day. Another old painters trick was to use a fast dry varnish and add a pint to the alkyd paint. Accelerates the drying and creates a beautiful depth of finish to the alkyd. Use on hand railings as a door would show a blotchy appearance over the larger area.
I've never learned to proof read. Red Oxide not rex
 

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Absolutely correct, an alkyd always has ambling qualities vs a non yellowing acrylic. take a styrofoam cup to you paint supplier, ask if they would add half ounce of yellow oxide or GX a clean yellow. take a small amount of your varnish or shellac and use a very small amount and add it to the varnish/shellac, it would definitely yellow the finish. Also works with rex oxide if you want to strengthen the cherry appearance or a little yellow with the red will give it a maple like appearance. At SW, you must use the BAC colorants, not the CCE. Genex I believe is still universal for latex or alkyds. Definitely works with varnish, I never worked with a shellac as in the old days there was white or amber shellac manufactured by Hausers. Have a good day. Another old painters trick was to use a fast dry varnish and add a pint to the alkyd paint. Accelerates the drying and creates a beautiful depth of finish to the alkyd. Use on hand railings as a door would show a blotchy appearance over the larger area.
Respectably I have to disagree; tinted varnish/urethane with universal colorants just results in cloudy appearance. If your tinting top coats you should at a minimum use dyes, something like transtint which are soluble in alcohol or alkyds. Even then I would use this technique as a last resort.

Also gennex is not soluble in alkyds, water base only.
 

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Absolutely correct, an alkyd always has ambling qualities vs a non yellowing acrylic. take a styrofoam cup to you paint supplier, ask if they would add half ounce of yellow oxide or GX a clean yellow. take a small amount of your varnish or shellac and use a very small amount and add it to the varnish/shellac, it would definitely yellow the finish. Also works with rex oxide if you want to strengthen the cherry appearance or a little yellow with the red will give it a maple like appearance. At SW, you must use the BAC colorants, not the CCE. Genex I believe is still universal for latex or alkyds. Definitely works with varnish, I never worked with a shellac as in the old days there was white or amber shellac manufactured by Hausers. Have a good day. Another old painters trick was to use a fast dry varnish and add a pint to the alkyd paint. Accelerates the drying and creates a beautiful depth of finish to the alkyd. Use on hand railings as a door would show a blotchy appearance over the larger area.
One reason I try not to use pigmented stains and/or pigmented toners when matching new to “naturally aged” wood is that after a few years, chances are it will look completely different than the existing. That’s where reactive chemical stains are advantageous. I’ll sometimes tweak the wood after chemically staining with natural dye-stuffs and/or dye toners in order to dial the color in better if needed. I’ll only resort to using pigments after exhausting all other options.

(Going way back, I’ve also used a ton of shellac by Mantrose-Haeuser before they were bought out by Zinsser)
 

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You could do a wash coat of orange shellac then dye your topcoat, you could just add dyes to your sanding sealer & then topcoat, and/or you could tone them after sealing them. I had a maple set that I did a few years ago where I ended up adding dyes to both my sealer & topcoat, then sprayed a very light mist as a toner, then sprayed my final coats. Since I was using waterborne products, (Emtech conversion varnish), it was the only way to achieve a satisfactory match. The toner must be sprayed with a rig that can produce a very fine mist with an even spray pattern though in order to keep the stain looking uniform without giving an opaque look if you go that route.

Many ways to get to the finish line. If you can tell us what products you'll be using as well as what equipment you have at your disposal, you'll likely get much more tailor-made suggestions.
Amber shellac would be my first choice too. Zinsser sells pre-mixed amber shellac. It is a pretty dark amber. If it is too dark he can cut it with SealCoat (also Zinsser) which is clear. Or if it needs to be darker, adding coats will give a darker effect.

Shellac has a bunch of admirable qualities. It offers excellent adhesion. It is non-toxic once dry, indeed every M & M you’ve ever eaten was coated with shellac (called “food glaze” when FDA approved). It is also hypoallergenic, skin contact with the dry film will not cause allergic reactions.

It dries in 20 minutes, regardless of the humidity. While it has a fairly strong odor while applying, it has no lingering odor.

The big hit on shellac is that if you spill your martini on the surface it will damage the finish. But there are lots of places where alcohol never goes near. I used it for years to coat drawer boxes, mainly for the quick dry and the no lingering odors. A closed drawer will retain odors for a long time.

You can find it at Lowes (but not at Home Depot). Home Depot lists it on line but the three stores near me do not carry any. Just the Sealcoat and B-I-N.
 

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This would be a simple match for me. Sounds like there are a lot of complicated processes that are labor intensive on the actual job to achieve a dead on match. For a close( most folks wouldn't notice) get a close stain match and clear with de-waxed shellac sealer for the oil look. Next I would topcoat with an ambered (water based analin dye of 1/2 tsp yellow, 1/8 tsp brown and 1/8 tsp orange per gallon) acrylic topcoat...wonderful desired color is achieved final topcoat with clear version of tented topcoat.....test samples and get client approval first has always worked for me :)
 

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Target Coatings EM8000 CV provides a nice warm amber glow on maple being it’s a waterborne alkyd emulsion.

Before & after pics of a maple table base finished w/the EM8000…left is after stripping…right is after 4 coats of the EM8000

View attachment 114523
looks great, especially for a water-reducible, low VOC clear!
 

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Thanks!
It’s a really nice & easy product to work with and provides a slightly aged look due to the amber tone. It’s also very durable and I highly recommend it!

Another example of the EM8000 CV on another table strip/refinish project:

View attachment 114524
View attachment 114525
do you brush that, or spray, or both?

I'm assuming you can mix only what you need, and the rest will keep for subsequent coats?
 

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do you brush that, or spray, or both?

I'm assuming you can mix only what you need, and the rest will keep for subsequent coats?
I’ve only sprayed it but am pretty certain it could be brushed and/or rolled and tipped off with a brush. It’s pre-catalyzed with an organosilane crosslinker which also inhibits alkyd yellowing…what you see is what you get without any further yellowing/ambering as would an oil alkyd poly. It can also be post catalyzed, and don’t quote me on this..I “think” it has a pot life of up to 100 hrs after post catalyzing, although it’s really not a catalyzed 2-pack system per say.
 

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Where is the best place to get these dyes? And can they be used with oil AND waterbased products?
Sorry for the delayed reply. Not sure how I missed this. I get mine from a local Woodcraft store, but it can be purchased online from most woodwork/finishing stores, (Rockler, Homestead Finishes, even Amazon or Ebay). The TransTint dyes I use aren't designed for oil varnishes/poly, but there are some finishers who still do it from time to time by adding it at approx. a 1:4 ratio, (1 part dye to 4 parts acetone), to Tung Oil and the like. It would depend upon which particular varnish/poly though, as well as how much mineral spirits that varnish is cut with, (as well as probably a lot of other things I don't even know, lol).
 

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One reason I try not to use pigmented stains and/or pigmented toners when matching new to “naturally aged” wood is that after a few years, chances are it will look completely different than the existing. That’s where reactive chemical stains are advantageous. I’ll sometimes tweak the wood after chemically staining with natural dye-stuffs and/or dye toners in order to dial the color in better if needed. I’ll only resort to using pigments after exhausting all other options.

(Going way back, I’ve also used a ton of shellac by Mantrose-Haeuser before they were bought out by Zinsser)
15 Years ago I worked at a SW store that sold the dyes with their commercial stains. Their dyes came in a pint bottle and worked very well when added to their suggested tint base. . The stain was very strong with a high solids ratio, therefore coverage or color change was excellent. This product was slightly pricier than conventional wood stains, therefore sold almost exclusively to Millworks and professional cabinet finishers. Compare Min-wax whose properties are very thin and multiple coats are necessary. Valspar has or had a versatile tint base with reasonable coverage, the first coat was their sanding sealer to produce a consistent color with a light sanding then their stain is applied. The sanding sealer was used to ensure color consistency on a variety of woods.

The colorant amount I suggested was a 1/32 or 1/48th of an ounce. Essentially it tweaked the color and added depth. The clarity of the stain was essentially provided by the type of wood and preparation. This is a trick I used when I encounter a difficult match or customer and especially useful when matching a mahogany on an inferior piece of wood. I always used either a cheesecloth or a fine steel wool to apply and control the color when staining.
 

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Some fantastic info here. I know the techy guys will heckle me here, but a less technical option could be just to use something like polyshades. AKA a tinted poly. Although trying to get the right tone is the tricky part. Would save mucking around with a bunch of chemicals unless it's in the budget of course..
 

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Some fantastic info here. I know the techy guys will heckle me here, but a less technical option could be just to use something like polyshades. AKA a tinted poly. Although trying to get the right tone is the tricky part. Would save mucking around with a bunch of chemicals unless it's in the budget of course..
Funny you mentioned Polysgades or poly stain. I worked for a company called Wattyl also known as Porter Paints in the early 90's. I told their sales manager that Polystain looked like somebody threw "poop through a screen door" when it came to a quality finisher product. I went to work for MAB Paints out of Philly shortly thereafter. My dad taught me to stain, apply a coat of clear or amber shellac, sand lightly and topcoat with a nice varnish like Zar. Modern paint store employees have a limited knowledge of paint {one could fit it into a thimble} and a mastery of selling product, even if the consequences hurt the credibility of the paint contractor. Rather than a paint brand. Find a store with professional sales people who stand behind their brand by looking after your best interests.. If you find paint issues are hurting your success, make it your priority to find a independent Paint Dealer. They understand the wonderful world of paint. Remember, I started by cleaning paint brushes way back in 1960. Have a great evening everyone.
 

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Funny you mentioned Polysgades or poly stain. I worked for a company called Wattyl also known as Porter Paints in the early 90's. I told their sales manager that Polystain looked like somebody threw "poop through a screen door" when it came to a quality finisher product. I went to work for MAB Paints out of Philly shortly thereafter. My dad taught me to stain, apply a coat of clear or amber shellac, sand lightly and topcoat with a nice varnish like Zar. Modern paint store employees have a limited knowledge of paint {one could fit it into a thimble} and a mastery of selling product, even if the consequences hurt the credibility of the paint contractor. Rather than a paint brand. Find a store with professional sales people who stand behind their brand by looking after your best interests.. If you find paint issues are hurting your success, make it your priority to find a independent Paint Dealer. They understand the wonderful world of paint. Remember, I started by cleaning paint brushes way back in 1960. Have a great evening everyone.
Porter made some fantastic products. Of course, PPG messed that up...
 

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Funny you mentioned Polysgades or poly stain. I worked for a company called Wattyl also known as Porter Paints in the early 90's. I told their sales manager that Polystain looked like somebody threw "poop through a screen door" when it came to a quality finisher product. I went to work for MAB Paints out of Philly shortly thereafter. My dad taught me to stain, apply a coat of clear or amber shellac, sand lightly and topcoat with a nice varnish like Zar. Modern paint store employees have a limited knowledge of paint {one could fit it into a thimble} and a mastery of selling product, even if the consequences hurt the credibility of the paint contractor. Rather than a paint brand. Find a store with professional sales people who stand behind their brand by looking after your best interests.. If you find paint issues are hurting your success, make it your priority to find a independent Paint Dealer. They understand the wonderful world of paint. Remember, I started by cleaning paint brushes way back in 1960. Have a great evening everyone.
I've only used polyshades once to touchup a handrail that was previously painted with it. And ya, it did not look good.
I really only threw that out there as a quick cheap option. A pre-stain then oil poly would be my vote.
 
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