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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Starting a job with a metal roof this week. It has 4 dormers dormer with hipped-ends, so a traditional ladder anchor (hook) does not work on the end. Too steep to stand on, so ropes and harness a must.

Are there anchors that can be safely used on metal roofs?

Any safety equipment that works especially well on metal roofs?

Considering getting a lift, but the power lines are very close.

112350
 

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Uggh. Could you put up scaffolding and then run planks off the scaffolding to the roof, so atleast it's level? Or we've also screwed 2x4s to the scaffolding planks and ran ladders up the roofline from there.. (not ideal)
What about permanently attaching screw on tie off hooks to some of the wooden trim? Convince client to leave on for future maintenance..
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Uggh. Could you put up scaffolding and then run planks off the scaffolding to the roof, so atleast it's level? Or we've also screwed 2x4s to the scaffolding planks and ran ladders up the roofline from there.. (not ideal)
What about permanently attaching screw on tie off hooks to some of the wooden trim? Convince client to leave on for future maintenance..
The “screw on tie off” anchors is a good idea.

thanks for suggestions.
 

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Ugh is right! I have never and will never work off a steel roof.

Short while ago, I finished up my first exterior of the season. Two story house with a covered porch that wrapped around the entire place. Customer told me they were getting a metal roof installed and wanted me to do the painting before the roof got put on. Roofers showed up and got the top lid done and had screwed 2X4 on the porch roof to place ladders to access the top section. Customer told me to screw as many more on as I wanted to make the job safe so I went to town! It turned the job into a dream!

When the roofers came back to do the porch roof I told them they'd better be careful up there because there wasn't going to be any touch ups happening if they damaged anything.
 

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Since you're already familiar with lifelines and rope grabs, you might consider getting a Universal Standing Seam Roof Clamp

The link is to a YouTube video which shows it in action. It can be used in either direction without having to reset, fits hundreds of seam profiles, and works best with retractable lifelines, (although any OSHA approved lifeline & grab could be used). IMO, regular lifelines are a major security risk to use on metal roofs, since all it takes is one missed-step of either tripping over it or stepping on the lifeline and you're going down, (at least until your system catches you).

They do make an even more stout 2-seam clamp, but I've never used it and not sure of the adjustability, but it seems more adjustments would be required to really dial it in, between having to set it for the profile and width of the seams to clamp on to as well as the distance between the seams.

And if you bought a set of Cougar Paws, they actually make a magnetic sole specifically for metal roofs, provided it's actually steel and not aluminum. They're called Steelwalker Boots. Between these, (for steel roofs), as well as the Standing Seam Roof Clamp and a Self-Retracting Lifeline, that's about as safe and sturdy as you can get while having to navigate on steel roofs. Oh ya, make sure your system has a good swivel incorporated in the system. Keeps from having to fight the system due to twists. Good luck and stay safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ugh is right! I have never and will never work off a steel roof.

Short while ago, I finished up my first exterior of the season. Two story house with a covered porch that wrapped around the entire place. Customer told me they were getting a metal roof installed and wanted me to do the painting before the roof got put on. Roofers showed up and got the top lid done and had screwed 2X4 on the porch roof to place ladders to access the top section. Customer told me to screw as many more on as I wanted to make the job safe so I went to town! It turned the job into a dream!

When the roofers came back to do the porch roof I told them they'd better be careful up there because there wasn't going to be any touch ups happening if they damaged anything.
This is only the second steel roof I've worked over, and I'm about to adopt your policy going forward.

I thought it would be easier. What a pain. The last painter (easy to tell) skipped all the dormers on the last paint job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Since you're already familiar with lifelines and rope grabs, you might consider getting a Universal Standing Seam Roof Clamp

The link is to a YouTube video which shows it in action. It can be used in either direction without having to reset, fits hundreds of seam profiles, and works best with retractable lifelines, (although any OSHA approved lifeline & grab could be used). IMO, regular lifelines are a major security risk to use on metal roofs, since all it takes is one missed-step of either tripping over it or stepping on the lifeline and you're going down, (at least until your system catches you).

They do make an even more stout 2-seam clamp, but I've never used it and not sure of the adjustability, but it seems more adjustments would be required to really dial it in, between having to set it for the profile and width of the seams to clamp on to as well as the distance between the seams.

And if you bought a set of Cougar Paws, they actually make a magnetic sole specifically for metal roofs, provided it's actually steel and not aluminum. They're called Steelwalker Boots. Between these, (for steel roofs), as well as the Standing Seam Roof Clamp and a Self-Retracting Lifeline, that's about as safe and sturdy as you can get while having to navigate on steel roofs. Oh ya, make sure your system has a good swivel incorporated in the system. Keeps from having to fight the system due to twists. Good luck and stay safe.
Thank you! That what I was looking for.

I have the cougar paws on site already.
 

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No insight here,, just complete respect for those who understand this part of the craft I never run into..and yeah..dont want to..all the best H.
 

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Since you're already familiar with lifelines and rope grabs, you might consider getting a Universal Standing Seam Roof Clamp

The link is to a YouTube video which shows it in action. It can be used in either direction without having to reset, fits hundreds of seam profiles, and works best with retractable lifelines, (although any OSHA approved lifeline & grab could be used). IMO, regular lifelines are a major security risk to use on metal roofs, since all it takes is one missed-step of either tripping over it or stepping on the lifeline and you're going down, (at least until your system catches you).

They do make an even more stout 2-seam clamp, but I've never used it and not sure of the adjustability, but it seems more adjustments would be required to really dial it in, between having to set it for the profile and width of the seams to clamp on to as well as the distance between the seams.

And if you bought a set of Cougar Paws, they actually make a magnetic sole specifically for metal roofs, provided it's actually steel and not aluminum. They're called Steelwalker Boots. Between these, (for steel roofs), as well as the Standing Seam Roof Clamp and a Self-Retracting Lifeline, that's about as safe and sturdy as you can get while having to navigate on steel roofs. Oh ya, make sure your system has a good swivel incorporated in the system. Keeps from having to fight the system due to twists. Good luck and stay safe.
Ya, that looks like a good unit. Although I always wonder how you get up there in the first place to install it and then un-install it when your done..I f.eel as though they should be mandatory permanent installs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Ya, that looks like a good unit. Although I always wonder how you get up there in the first place to install it and then un-install it when your done..I feel as though they should be mandatory permanent installs.
AGREE - was saying all week permanent anchors should be mandatory on this kind of roof!
 

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Couple pics- here’s what we did on the side dormers yesterday. Slow and safe.
Not planning to do another standing metal seam roof after this.

*neighbor let me anchor a rope directly to her house, and throw a rope over, so I could wear a safety harness for first ascent.

View attachment 112361
View attachment 112362

View attachment 112364
I love that chicken ladder. Pipe insulation works well on the underside to keep from marring surface and provides additional grip if needed. Is that termination knot a bowline on a bight? Is it even a termination knot or is a midline loop? Can't tell what's going on with the bitter end of that rope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I love that chicken ladder. Pipe insulation works well on the underside to keep from marring surface and provides additional grip if needed. Is that termination knot a bowline on a bight? Is it even a termination knot or is a midline loop? Can't tell what's going on with the bitter end of that rope.
The Chicken Ladder is heavy and slow, and I hate moving it, but couldn't figure out a better/safer way.
Pipe Insulation -that is an excellent idea; Would keep it from slipping, and also protect the roof. I come to PT for that kind of info.

The white rope is about 100', so I made a Figure Eight Loop about halfway and clipped onto the Chicken Ladder with a carabiner. Half the rope is on each side of the house. It gives me something relatively stable to hold onto for balance while working and moving around, and we use the termination at the ground level (also tied with a figure eight loop w/ a stopper knot, and a carabiner) to pull up the chicken ladder sections.

The Orange rope used for initial ascent, is anchored to two pillars on the neighbors house. It is looped around the nearby stink stack temporarily so it doesn't slide out of reach).
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I love that chicken ladder. Pipe insulation works well on the underside to keep from marring surface and provides additional grip if needed. Is that termination knot a bowline on a bight? Is it even a termination knot or is a midline loop? Can't tell what's going on with the bitter end of that rope.
Would you attach the pipe insulation permanently (with tape at intervals) or apply them temporarily/loose?

I felt that the Goat Pole also needed the bottoms to have some sort of adhesive rubber pads underneath for traction, as the plastic can be slick, creating potential hazards if one was not paying attention. Was considering how best to mod that for next time. Something like Zip System Flashing Tape that would be highly adhesive and durable, but also offer improved grip.
 

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Would you attach the pipe insulation permanently (with tape at intervals) or apply them temporarily/loose?

I felt that the Goat Pole also needed the bottoms to have some sort of adhesive rubber pads underneath for traction, as the plastic can be slick, creating potential hazards if one was not paying attention. Was considering how best to mod that for next time. Something like Zip System Flashing Tape that would be highly adhesive and durable, but also offer improved grip.
The pipe insulation is a little to fragile to be considered permanent, but I do attach electrical tape at intervals to affix it to the ladder. I would think anything attached too loose might just get hung up on everything.

Have you ever tried the Alpine Butterfly for a Midline Loop? It's much easier to inspect and would be very difficult to tie wrong. Bowline on a Bight is plenty secure as long as you're always the one tying it, but having anyone else tie it could be problematic, due to the ease in which it can be tied wrong, and the potential ramifications if it were. The Alpine Butterfly is something that I use a lot for arborist work as well. It's also bidirectional, won't easily jam, and very simple to tie/untie.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The pipe insulation is a little to fragile to be considered permanent, but I do attach electrical tape at intervals to affix it to the ladder. I would think anything attached too loose might just get hung up on everything.

Have you ever tried the Alpine Butterfly for a Midline Loop? It's much easier to inspect and would be very difficult to tie wrong. Bowline on a Bight is plenty secure as long as you're always the one tying it, but having anyone else tie it could be problematic, due to the ease in which it can be tied wrong, and the potential ramifications if it were. The Alpine Butterfly is something that I use a lot for arborist work as well. It's also bidirectional, won't easily jam, and very simple to tie/untie.
electrical tape- good call.

The problem with knots is that I don't remember them very well.
The Alpine Loop looks like a better knot for a midline bight than the figure eight loop, but I can tell you which one I'll remember...
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The pipe insulation is a little to fragile to be considered permanent, but I do attach electrical tape at intervals to affix it to the ladder. I would think anything attached too loose might just get hung up on everything.

Have you ever tried the Alpine Butterfly for a Midline Loop? It's much easier to inspect and would be very difficult to tie wrong. Bowline on a Bight is plenty secure as long as you're always the one tying it, but having anyone else tie it could be problematic, due to the ease in which it can be tied wrong, and the potential ramifications if it were. The Alpine Butterfly is something that I use a lot for arborist work as well. It's also bidirectional, won't easily jam, and very simple to tie/untie.
I don't tie enough knots often enough to remember them well, and would be afraid to tie them wrong.
Alpine-Butterfly-errors-1024x534.jpg

I know one knot really well, and I use it almost exclusively when using safety gear. Maybe I need to learn a second knot?
R.8a6e1f1ec3aee3317b98cac9d08c6a2c.jpeg
 

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My friend has a tree surgery business and he uses a 100 foot boom truck to lift and drop pieces of a tree that are dangerously close to a house. He also offers it for hire for other tree surgeons and sign installers and air conditioners. He offers it for hire with his operator. There is no bucket, but the men can hook up their harness to the boom.

I am also reminded of the Mount Everest climbs where they use ladders to traverse the cwms (no vowels in that word--it means "crevasse").

 
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