Professional Painting Contractors Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm one of those painters that washes his roller covers. Out of the package, by mfg directions, I have to pre wet the roller. Once I wash it, the cover dries, and I go to use it again, should I pre wet again? I tried it and I didn't see any difference. Just wondering if anyone knew. Out of the package it seems to make a difference in coverage and it rolls easier, less suction. I have a drill mounted spin roller and it works great for cleaning them out
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,542 Posts
I'm one of those painters that washes his roller covers. Out of the package, by mfg directions, I have to pre wet the roller. Once I wash it, the cover dries, and I go to use it again, should I pre wet again? I tried it and I didn't see any difference. Just wondering if anyone knew. Out of the package it seems to make a difference in coverage and it rolls easier, less suction. I have a drill mounted spin roller and it works great for cleaning them out
What is the purpose of pre-wetting rollers? Is it to rinse off chemicals to protect fibers for shipment, or for another reason?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What is the purpose of pre-wetting rollers? Is it to rinse off chemicals to protect fibers for shipment, or for another reason?
Great question. I don't know. It says to pre-wet on the packaging so I pre wet. I didn't when I first started using them and noticed no fuzz or fibers left behind. But when I did pre wet I noticed the roller rolled easier and it covered better with less materials. But when I prewet after they been washed I don't notice any difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
Here's an old discussion started by the long lost PACman re: what a rep told him about it. (As ever, no clear consensus emerged about the real value, but apparently a lot of people do it).

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here's an old discussion started by the long lost PACman re: what a rep told him about it. (As ever, no clear consensus emerged about the real value, but apparently a lot of people do it).

Interesting discussion. It seems like the answer would be pre wet any dry roller to help achieve roller saturation faster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,158 Posts
I’ve always pre-wet rollers and brushes. Was told by old timer it primes the tool and helps transfer material to the surface. Keeps the heel moist to facilitate cleaning with lower VOC paints. Some brush reps say the opposite. Just a habit for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Wooster brush states that they do not recommend pre-wetting and they don't use that in their testing laboratory. I just wrote to Purdy to see what their recommendation is. I will report as soon as I hear back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Wooster brush states that they do not recommend pre-wetting and they don't use that in their testing laboratory. I just wrote to Purdy to see what their recommendation is. I will report as soon as I hear back.
Purdy replied to my inquiry but I am not certain I understand what they meant. I had asked if it should be pre-wet just the first time it is used or each time it is used.



From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Web - Purdy
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 8:58 AM
To: Packard
Subject: Inquiry



Thanks for contacting Purdy.

Yes, it is a good idea to condition or pre-wet the cover before use. You shouldn't have to do this every roll, just before you start painting. I personally feel this information should be on all roller cover packages, but it is not.

Please let us know if you need additional assistance.

Kind Regards,

Daniel

Product Support
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Purdy replied to my inquiry but I am not certain I understand what they meant. I had asked if it should be pre-wet just the first time it is used or each time it is used.



From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Web - Purdy
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 8:58 AM
To: Packard
Subject: Inquiry




Thanks for contacting Purdy.

Yes, it is a good idea to condition or pre-wet the cover before use. You shouldn't have to do this every roll, just before you start painting. I personally feel this information should be on all roller cover packages, but it is not.

Please let us know if you need additional assistance.

Kind Regards,

Daniel

Product Support
It is a bit confusing the reply. But I would take it that it is good to pre condition when it’s brand new. And then once broken in that’s it. Don’t have to do it again!

Does anyone know why we need to pre condition roller so it holds a full roller of paint right off the hop? Are we washing out chemicals from manufacturing, or what. And whatever this pre wetting the first time is doing, why wouldn't the manufacturer do this!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,614 Posts
Have to wonder if pre wetting the sleeve provides the paint a vehicle to allow it to completely soak into the inner fibers of the sleeve. Rather than paint sitting on top and eventually paint being pushed into the inner fibers by actually rolling. When I first started using micro fiber sleeves I noticed the first pass with a new sleeve looking a little weak so I started spending more time mashing them around in my paint tray until they were fully loaded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
I put paint in my tray, and load up the sleeve, then let it sit there while I cut in. Gives it a bit of a head start.

On a lot of new construction, there's no access to water, and only occasional access to electricity. So unless you bring water, you have nothing to pre-wet your stuff with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
I put paint in my tray, and load up the sleeve, then let it sit there while I cut in. Gives it a bit of a head start.

On a lot of new construction, there's no access to water, and only occasional access to electricity. So unless you bring water, you have nothing to pre-wet your stuff with.
I can't imagine being on any job w/out water. I have a dedicated 5 that comes with me full if water access will be a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
I have microfiber towels. When freshly laundered they seem to resist absorbing water. But once wet and squeezed out they absorb water faster than cotton towels (and wring out easier too).

I assumed early on that the initial washing was to rid the roller of any lint that might transfer to the walls. I don't know why I thought that though.

I suspect that pre-wetting and then squeezing out the excess water allows faster absorbtion of the paint, but I don't know that to be a fact either. I have an accurate scale. I will have to weigh the amount of paint absorbed by a roller that has been pre-wet vs. one that has not to see if there is more (or quicker) absorption of the paint.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top