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I think urgency is the concept of conveying to the customer that it’s in their best interest to commit now rather than later. I used to do so if a customer wanted a job to be scheduled close to a specific date. My “urgency” would be; “Well, IF you want to lock in that approximate time, and you want to go with us, don’t wait too long to commit since our schedule is filling up quickly.” It wasn’t a lie, or just a line to land the job, it was the truth - but also a good way to wrap up a sale.
 

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I think urgency is the concept of conveying to the customer that it’s in their best interest to commit now rather than later. I used to do so if a customer wanted a job to be scheduled close to a specific date. My “urgency” would be; “Well, IF you want to lock in that approximate time, and you want to go with us, don’t wait too long to commit since our schedule is filling up quickly.” It wasn’t a lie, or just a line to land the job, it was the truth - but also a good way to wrap up a sale.
I couldn't have said it any better.
 

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I think urgency is the concept of conveying to the customer that it’s in their best interest to commit now rather than later. I used to do so if a customer wanted a job to be scheduled close to a specific date. My “urgency” would be; “Well, IF you want to lock in that approximate time, and you want to go with us, don’t wait too long to commit since our schedule is filling up quickly.” It wasn’t a lie, or just a line to land the job, it was the truth - but also a good way to wrap up a sale.
I think the part that bothered me was the idea of "creating urgency", which is different than being in-demand, and stem from very different motives.
 

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Holland,

Item two, regarding "urgency", has to do with the cliche method of provoking urgency in a customer to purchase your product. For example "This is the last day of the sale".
Sales people often extend there hand forcefully 'asking' to shake on a deal. I saw a painter (formerly sales) do this once In my store and it was indeed cringe to watch. What's worse is before the job started he got some girl pregnant in California and left his business partner hanging in the wind. I learned a valuable lesson that day.
 

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Having done a little sales, with moderate success, but hardly any reward, I can testify that it is an art form rather than a procedure in a business transaction. Some people are artists, and others...well.
 

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Creating urgency to buy a product or service in the mind of the consumer is the name of the game. Just watch some television commercials and look for the sense of urgency and you’ll often see it - though sometimes it’s pretty subtle. “Special offer, act now and… , for a limited time, while supplies last”, etc. are all meant to do it. Insurance companies are especially good at conveying it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Holland, creating urgency is a basic sales technique. It doesn’t mean your fabricating urgency. But if there t1-11 is peeling and curling at the ends, it’s best to let them know that waiting until next year or 2 years is not in there best interest. It will cost them more in prep and possibly siding damage. I know this, but they may not, therefore I must “create” urgency, by informing them of these real world issues, without making them feel pressure because it is not my intent to pressure. I want people to want to hire me, not feel like they have to.

I’m too fast to work by the hour means, a painter in my aera is only gonna make most 25 as a w2 employee. Maybe 28 if commercial. Now I know what I’m doing and I’m fast I’m a hard worker. If I told someone I charged 50 an hour to paint there bedroom they would think that’s rediculous. However if I tell them I’ll paint their 10x12 bedroom walls only for 250 with paint they would think that’s a smoking deal. It’s also a good deal for me. I can put 1 coat in one hour. So 2 hrs labor, plus dropping off, removing switch covers, sanding walls, sparkling we’ll call 3 hrs. My price on promar 200 is 25 a gallon (used to be 17 when I was working for the man). So 2 gallons of paint, 50, 3 hours of labor, and 1 hour giving estimate and follow up. I average 50 an hour to me that’s good money I understand overhead, taxes, ect. But the point I’m trying to make is it makes more sense for me to charge by the job not the hour, because I’m “too fast” to charge by the hour to a homeowner.

Also, I don’t Believe I’m putting the cart before the horse. I have a solid job that’s just not ready. I have another tentative. And I’ve only been marketing for one week. What I was looking for is sales advice from anyone that has any SALES experience, to get CASH FLOW now. If you don’t understand basic sales process then don’t try to belittle me because In the end it’s you that’s losing potential not me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
And Holland, when I ask for the businesss, after looking at my pictures telling them about my experience and presenting them with the quote, I ask for the sale like this (there’s usually a pause when they look at the quote)

like I said I’m new in business, I’m offering these jobs affordable prices because I’m looking to make a name for myself and get referrals ,I do charge a 10% deposit, are you comfortable scheduling with me today or do you need some time to think about it”

most say they need some time I follow up in 6 days

I don’t wannna pressure people, but I am not scared to ask for there businesss after all I’m in business to do business. I’ve put a lot of money up in taxes and equipment to be scared to ask for business.
 

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I never ask people to commit on the spot. Especially on jobs over $1000. I usually say I'll get something written up for you in the next couple days. Unless it's a small job, like 1 or 2 rooms. Then I can easily say. $500 and I can probably get in here early next week if you want? But pressuring someone into a $2500 commitment is a little more pressure. Without knowing your actual demeanor or personal vibe, it's hard to say why you aren't getting the sales. But Being a good and fast Painter almost has nothing to do with it. People just need to like you and feel that they can trust you. Honesty and integrity goes a long way in business.
 

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Check your local ordinances before considering door to door peddling/solicitation, or even if distributing flyers. Some jurisdictions require door to door vendors to obtain a permit/license. Other jurisdictions expressly forbid it.

Example of a local ordinance in a village where I’ve regularly worked.., “No person shall enter any private residential property in the Village of Xxxxxxxx, Xxxxxx County, xxxxxx, for the purpose of vending, peddling or soliciting .......”
 

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Check your local ordinances before considering door to door peddling/solicitation, or even if distributing flyers. Some jurisdictions require door to door vendors to obtain a permit/license. Other jurisdictions expressly forbid it.

Example of a local ordinance in a village where I’ve regularly worked.., “No person shall enter any private residential property in the Village of Xxxxxxxx, Xxxxxx County, xxxxxx, for the purpose of vending, peddling or soliciting .......”
e4-2-768x519.jpg

I've been trying to reach you about your vehicle's extended warranty.
 

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View attachment 112281

I've been trying to reach you about your vehicle's extended warranty.
My first ever painting contract was admittedly obtained by knocking on a door and pitching a homeowner (I’ve only done it that one time).

The homeowner informed me that door to door solicitations weren’t permitted in the Village as well as being inappropriate, essentially slamming the door in my face.

Later that same day, the homeowner called me up, asking me to stop by his home the following morning, and provided me with the opportunity, in his exact words, to “Show me what you got Kid.”

Below is a link to the home, being my first project when starting my business in the mid 1980s. It was a pretty nice score for a newbie.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/6-Gin-Ln-Southampton-NY-11968/32718060_zpid/
 

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I never ask people to commit on the spot. Especially on jobs over $1000. I usually say I'll get something written up for you in the next couple days. Unless it's a small job, like 1 or 2 rooms. Then I can easily say. $500 and I can probably get in here early next week if you want? But pressuring someone into a $2500 commitment is a little more pressure. Without knowing your actual demeanor or personal vibe, it's hard to say why you aren't getting the sales. But Being a good and fast Painter almost has nothing to do with it. People just need to like you and feel that they can trust you. Honesty and integrity goes a long way in business.
That is even more of a factor when you are working inside their homes. Their being comfortable and feeling they can trust you is a huge factor - feelings that may have nothing to do with your business practices.
 

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Clearly, good salesmanship involves the following:
1. Liking to engage with people
2. Patience
3. Understanding human behavior
4. Humility
5. Perseverance

Bad sales techniques:
1. Being arrogant
2. Not listening
3. Displaying urgency
4. Anger
5. Not liking people

Everyone knows that sales are not exclusively dependent on craft knowledge, techniques, products, or production, but rather character perception.
 

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My first real break was accidentally meeting a homeowner in front of his home. It was long overdue for re-staining, and I mentioned to him that I was a painter.

He asked for a written estimate (which I wrote out in pen and paper - before I had a computer and email). He asked a lot of questions, and was dubious, but in the end he hired me (he had his caretaker check on me everyday).

I later painted the entire interior of his home, and then his sisters house (*interior and exterior) down the road, and eventually over half the homes in the neighborhood, many of whom I have maintained as customers to this day (almost twenty years later).

@BrushSwing3R - Reputation must be earned, and it can make you or break you in this field.
You're worried about booking 2-3 months out, charging $50 an hour, and wasting time writing 6 estimates, but maybe it would go better for you if you are more open to taking work you consider is beneath you, and start out pricing a little lower, at least until you have a base of customers. wow, is your rate really $50/hr?
 

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You've been given some awesome advice by many members. It's easy to get discouraged and frustrated when first starting out. Just a few ideas:

-If you need cash flow NOW, consider subbing for reputable Painting Contractors on the side while you line up some work. When I first started, I looked at other painters as competition rather than an asset. It was a huge mistake that set me back at least a decade before I changed my way of thinking. Being able to refer and get work from other good painters in your area is something which will benefit everyone involved. Contact as many local outfits as you can find with a good reputation. That's the best suggestion I have for you to get some cash flow now.'

-Keep meticulous records across the board. Not only will you need a true idea of what it cost you to stay afloat, it'll expedite the bidding process with builders and GC's when they ask for your price per ft. Equally important is reviewing your records to see what's working and what isn't during the sales & acquisition process. Cold calls and door knocks is a number's game. I wouldn't expect to receive a higher acceptance rate than 5% for door-to-door, which means you'll have to do this entire process 20 times to get 1 job. Flyers and direct mail, maybe .01% acceptance rate at most, and that's if you're targeting ideal areas.

-Because the sales & acquisition process can be so time intensive, consider looking for a salesman who'd be willing to work based on commission only. That way, you pay them nothing until they find you jobs. It might not be easy, but there are some out there willing to be compensated this way.

-Commit some time to social media and free local directories. It's a free way to get your name out there and potentially reach a lot of people. Best to not make every post about trying to sell them something, so throw in useful tips, tricks, or just funny stuff. People will only listen to you for so long if every post is promotional.

-Read as much as you can here on PT. Not just the stickies, but anything you can find time for. I can't tell you how much I've learned from fellow members over the years. When I joined about 9 years ago, I really thought I had most everything figured out. It was both humbling and exciting to quickly realize I had a lot to learn. I still get that feeling when I read something from a member that I never knew...some really profound things that made me reevaluate my entire business model, and other little tips & tricks I'm still constantly trying to pick up to improve in any way I can.

Good Luck man.
 

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I would suggest that the part about knowing about your craft and the products you use so you can speak intelligently and confidently with your pr
You've been given some awesome advice by many members. It's easy to get discouraged and frustrated when first starting out. Just a few ideas:

-If you need cash flow NOW, consider subbing for reputable Painting Contractors on the side while you line up some work. When I first started, I looked at other painters as competition rather than an asset. It was a huge mistake that set me back at least a decade before I changed my way of thinking. Being able to refer and get work from other good painters in your area is something which will benefit everyone involved. Contact as many local outfits as you can find with a good reputation. That's the best suggestion I have for you to get some cash flow now.'

-Keep meticulous records across the board. Not only will you need a true idea of what it cost you to stay afloat, it'll expedite the bidding process with builders and GC's when they ask for your price per ft. Equally important is reviewing your records to see what's working and what isn't during the sales & acquisition process. Cold calls and door knocks is a number's game. I wouldn't expect to receive a higher acceptance rate than 5% for door-to-door, which means you'll have to do this entire process 20 times to get 1 job. Flyers and direct mail, maybe .01% acceptance rate at most, and that's if you're targeting ideal areas.

-Because the sales & acquisition process can be so time intensive, consider looking for a salesman who'd be willing to work based on commission only. That way, you pay them nothing until they find you jobs. It might not be easy, but there are some out there willing to be compensated this way.

-Commit some time to social media and free local directories. It's a free way to get your name out there and potentially reach a lot of people. Best to not make every post about trying to sell them something, so throw in useful tips, tricks, or just funny stuff. People will only listen to you for so long if every post is promotional.

-Read as much as you can here on PT. Not just the stickies, but anything you can find time for. I can't tell you how much I've learned from fellow members over the years. When I joined about 9 years ago, I really thought I had most everything figured out. It was both humbling and exciting to quickly realize I had a lot to learn. I still get that feeling when I read something from a member that I never knew...some really profound things that made me reevaluate my entire business model, and other little tips & tricks I'm still constantly trying to pick up to improve in any way I can.

Good Luck man.
Glad I could help. 😁😗😉
 

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You've said a few things that may be potential red flags if I were the customer (or as another painter listening to give feedback).

"I don’t work by the hour I’m to fast for that"

I thought you needed money? I don't understand what you think working by the hour means, but this would be a great topic for discussion!

"am I not building urgency? How do you build urgency?"

"Urgency"? I've never heard this term before in this context, what do you mean?

"I write the price right there, on a line item quote sheet, I ask for the job."

Do you literally ask for the job? How do you phrase that?

"is it normal for them to want to schedule 2 or 3 months out?"

That may be putting the cart in front of the horse at this time.
I totally agree with everything you just said. I started painting in 1992 and by 93 I thought I was as good as my grandfather who had done it for 40 years. The moral is it takes time, patience, practice and repetition In every field this occupation has to offer before Things really start to go your way. I'm not saying you're not good or fast but you shouldn't expect to just start slamming right away, just because you think so. You have to be very confident when you're giving numbers and that's just something that comes with time. (But 1st never ask them if they're going to hire you) When I give estimates.--- I introduce myself and I'm always dressed in clean whites and freshly shaven. I usually comment something nice about the home or some type of engaging conversation. I don't usually start right at business unless they do. If they go right to it then so do I but I'll wait and then ask them so what is it that you're looking to have done exactly. Always Be receiving of what they're saying and when they're done I show them the difference between a painter and a Professional Custom Painter. Point out all the details of the job and how your company is different from the rest. When I leave for work everyday I feel like it's my world. That's where I'm most comfortable at and that comes off to the customers. Which I never treat them like a customer. When I leave they feel like I'm a friend. And who wouldn't pick a friend to do work for them. I take down notes, give ideas but never colors. Tell them approximate completion time. Then I will go home and go over the numbers and send a text or email back with the estimate as soon as possible it is possible. I usually go about 1 to 2 days before returning the estimate But depending on how quickly they're wanting it of course. My estimates are all hand typed on the computer very professional with my logo but this is a process that I've worked on for years and it's what works best for me. Of course there's a lot more that goes into it but that's the gist. Now I can't say it will work for you but the God's truth is My sales rate has gotta be around 98%. I do mostly residential custom Interior and exterior repaint, Deck stains and power washing, epoxy floors and counters, cabinets, drywall hanging and finishing, trim work, Wood replacement, and anything they wanna pay me for. just about. I never feel like I'm competing for a job I feel like helping someone complete a Project. If you start to look at it like that it'll probably help a little.
Good luck! Paintr1 Out.
 

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New to the Paint Talk. Recently decided to go into business for my self.

Background, I’m a journeyman painter, commercial, residential. Approaching 30 years old I’m vary fast and produce quality quickly. Cut straight lines prefer to roll with an 18” but I’m faster with a sprayer. Spray anything I can.

Im having trouble landing jobs, I’ve posted on Craigslist, Facebook. Cold called property management companies. I’ve gone knocking on doors, basically pitching that I started a paint company and im offering free estimates and affordable prices. Most of my leads are from knocking on doors.
I’ve done 6 estimates, sold 0. One full exterior is ready but wants to get new windows first. 2 tentative but couldn’t commit, one because of price, one for unknown time frame. The rest threw the cracks. I’m a very good painter I bought a pump and van have all my grip I’m ready to work and I have a mind for business but seems like I spend all my time giving estimates and haven’t made sh**. Looking for advice. I don’t wanna pressure people. They all say my prices seem fair. I need to make SOME SORT OF MONEY, at least enough to pay the bills.

Any advice from experience in my position I’m grateful.

I started my company at 24 with a pressure washer $200 and a pickup truck, I am not going to lie the Lord has looked out for me many times over along the way, made some great choices, some expensive mistakes, one I am still paying for but we are blessed and doing well all in all if you want to chat I can give you pointers, no gimmicks just paying it forward. David Brooks
 
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