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Got an odd request for a quote. To prime ONLY 16 office spaces of new drywall. Typically I don't dust the walls on new residential. I prime over and then sand after and also sand after 1st coat. Now it's not really sanding it is just knocking down anything that is left proud on the walls. But I'm not the finish painter on this job. What is the proper thing to do? Dust the walls? Do a sand after to leave a good surface for the finisher? Dusting is not needed, IMO, because whether I dust or not I'm sanding anyway before 1st coat, but I'm not finishing. Thoughts.
 

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If you are not doing any pointing up you could prime/seal with Gardz without dusting. Gardz will soak right through the dust and bond it to the wall. The problem with Gardz is that it dries clear so it is more difficult to find any boo boos that need fixing compared to a white primer/sealer.

futtyos
 

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I still dont understand why people think its harder to find defects if the primer is clear.

Honestly though, Ive never seen anyone dust walls in a commercial setting.
Perhaps you have better eyes than I do, but here is my experience with pointing up procedures.

When I had to get back into painting in 2012-13 I did a repaint for a client of a realtor friend of mine. The walls were somewhat beaten up in some areas. I was going over them with basically the same color eggshell finish. I spent a LOT of time in the living room trying to patch the walls. I used a light to show shadows on the walls where bumps and dings were, then I spackled and sanded them, then applied the 1st coat of paint. After getting the 1st coat on, all kinds of bumps, dings and imperfections JUMPED out at me that I had previously not seen even though I closely inspected all areas of the walls. Here in the Chicago area there is virtually not texturing of walls or ceilings, so everything is flat and imperfections are a lot more noticeable.

Not saying this is the best way to do things, but it is a way.

futtyos
 

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Perhaps you have better eyes than I do, but here is my experience with pointing up procedures.

When I had to get back into painting in 2012-13 I did a repaint for a client of a realtor friend of mine. The walls were somewhat beaten up in some areas. I was going over them with basically the same color eggshell finish. I spent a LOT of time in the living room trying to patch the walls. I used a light to show shadows on the walls where bumps and dings were, then I spackled and sanded them, then applied the 1st coat of paint. After getting the 1st coat on, all kinds of bumps, dings and imperfections JUMPED out at me that I had previously not seen even though I closely inspected all areas of the walls. Here in the Chicago area there is virtually not texturing of walls or ceilings, so everything is flat and imperfections are a lot more noticeable.

Not saying this is the best way to do things, but it is a way.

futtyos
My experience also. I would at least use a leaf blower.
 

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My experience also. I would at least use a leaf blower.
I used a leaf blower once. It was in an empty condo at Marina Towers in Chicago. By empty I mean that there was only skim coated ceilings and walls, no flooring, no kitchen, bathrooms or anything. I used a leaf blower along with a fan in an open doorway out to the balcony. What a mess! Never again.

futtyos
 

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Perhaps you have better eyes than I do, but here is my experience with pointing up procedures.

When I had to get back into painting in 2012-13 I did a repaint for a client of a realtor friend of mine. The walls were somewhat beaten up in some areas. I was going over them with basically the same color eggshell finish. I spent a LOT of time in the living room trying to patch the walls. I used a light to show shadows on the walls where bumps and dings were, then I spackled and sanded them, then applied the 1st coat of paint. After getting the 1st coat on, all kinds of bumps, dings and imperfections JUMPED out at me that I had previously not seen even though I closely inspected all areas of the walls. Here in the Chicago area there is virtually not texturing of walls or ceilings, so everything is flat and imperfections are a lot more noticeable.

Not saying this is the best way to do things, but it is a way.

futtyos
IDK, I can see wall defects just fine after Gardzing, myself...All you need to see is a shadow.

Anyway, hes talking about a commercial setting. Probly dont want to use gardz there anyway. Its all about what the architect specced, which is probably just a PVA primer.
 
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