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"I would love to spend a day painting with you. I make people like yourself all the time look like you just learned how to hold a brush.

You dont post a single thing on these boards worth a damn to anyone. If I knew you personally as my comp I would carry all your BS posts with me in a folder to show the customers how a professional painter behaves."

This was a sweet PM from Jack to me...... Buddy how many times do you need to be trashed here. We have picked the crap out of your lousy "how to" videos and now you NC sequence. Your a joke. Your blog is a poor attempt to get noticed from manufacturers to test product. I dont think you really have the slightest clue. Get a folder and come up to Boston. As I have said before, I'll give you a job cleaning brushes. You would not be my competition. I don't paint dog houses.
Seriously, you are a joke on this board.
 

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Seriously, you are a joke on this board.
Jack - In all seriousness, Your 'ideas' are probably a little ahead of their time. You preach against tradition at the speed of light. You're talking about re-inventing the wheel but the tires that run on them don't fit.

You can't really expect to tell a few thousand tradesmen that they've been doing it wrong all of their life and that they should be turning it out 7 times faster without getting some fallout. Don't get at NEPS. He's just saying what all of the 'tadesmen' are thinking.
 

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Hey guys, I just had a breakthrough today inspired by our esteemed colleague. If I glue 7 stir sticks together I can stir 7 times as much paint 7 times as fast for an exponential production gain of 49%. I was gonna keep this top secret but I am too excited.

Seriously Jack, you are probably here fishing for inexperienced startups to go to your blog and get hooked into paying you to consult them. The problem is, you present ideas that are very mundane and not particularly breakthrough quality and try to attach outrageous results to them. Its too transparent to be believable. I did like your work here: www.bejane.com

That was cool. Why arent you listed among the "expert janes" over there?
 

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Since he is not listed as an expert jane, here are the pearls of wisdom. All you painters in the house, raise your hand in the air if you can think of a latex primer that is capable of exceeding Mr. Pauhl's 10 criteria:

Is primer for you?
Jack Pauhl writes:
Mon, 01/19/2009 - 11:30am
The best primer for bare drywall depends on what expectations you have from the paint you will apply over it. You have a few options, the short answer is – primer is not the best option for new drywall, a drywall sealer such as Zinsser Gardz is. However, keep in mind like any product, there are many differences in quality and features. It’s best to decide what you expect out of the paint you will be putting over the bare drywall. Some people paint to simply freshen up a room with no other expectations such as 1) hanging wallpaper at a later date or 2) having the option to wipe, 3) wash, 4) scrub the walls or 5) in kids rooms being able to remove crayon and permanent marker, 6) ability to repeatedly remove taped-up posters and pictures and 7) to apply and remove masking tape for a wild color scheme of stripes and stars, 8) applying finish paint such as eggshell or semi-gloss, 9) high traffic areas and 10) in rooms or areas with large amounts of window glare. Whatever your expectations are for finish paints - washability and scrubabilty features and the items listed above are dependant on the basecoat beneath the top coat. It’s important to understand the different capabilities of wall primers. You may want to google me and read up on bare drywall for a more in depth look at the limitations of wall primer.

 

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Hey Mantis,

Do you have any problems with overspray on walls when spraying semi-gloss latex on trim and cutting and rolling flat latex on walls?

Thank you,
NicoloB
Hi NicoloB! Welcome to Paint Talk!
I'm not quite sure what problems you are eluding to.
Haloing? Could be a problem if you're planning on spraying 1 coat of finish i guess.
Ahesion? We pole sand (no i havent bought a damned 360 yet!) the walls before we brush and roll. Sanding the overspray knocks the sheen off the semi and the wall paint has no problem sticking where it needs to stick. Now we have had issues with tape pulling the wall paint off due to improper scuff sanding, take a piece of paper to the areas your stick cant reach and you'll be fine.
 

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Mantis, ever try this?

Switch 4 and 5 around and skip 6 until before 9

edit: whoop. Switch 4 and 5 around and skip 6 until [AFTER] 9
Just so im clear... you are asking to fill holes after prime and sand primer after we caulk?
We never fill after prime. Trim primer is better suited for hiding the filler and sealing it up better than finish. Less flashing, bleed through, etc. This is especially true on larger patches or when using a more porous filler. Generally speaking, if we have to patch anything larger than a nail head with putty after the prime I'll shoot it with a can of Pro Block before spraying my first finish coat.

As far as skipping 6 until after 9... Never. Prime, Sand, 1st coat trim, then caulk. Occasionally I'll caulk after sanding the primer, but normally after the first coat of trim finish. From what I'm gathering from reading your post, you prime then fill holes, sand holes, caulk, then shoot 2 coats of trim? When do you sand your primer? With your first top coat? Seems like that would leave a lot of bad caulk lines and sore fingers. We used to caulk and fill everything before we prime trim, but not anymore. I can't imagine priming trim then caulking THEN sanding... ouch.
 

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For a high quality finish, it is ESSENTIAL to sand the primer coat well. If you apply finish to unsanded primer, it will never be as good. I fill nail holes before primer as well, since sanding can burn through primer.

I fill, sand, prime, sand, caulk, finish, sand, finish.
 

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Jack - In all seriousness, Your 'ideas' are probably a little ahead of their time. You preach against tradition at the speed of light. You're talking about re-inventing the wheel but the tires that run on them don't fit.

You can't really expect to tell a few thousand tradesmen that they've been doing it wrong all of their life and that they should be turning it out 7 times faster without getting some fallout. Don't get at NEPS. He's just saying what all of the 'tadesmen' are thinking.
I know but I'm no hack. You wrote: "Jack - In all seriousness, Your 'ideas' are probably a little ahead of their time". No, the way I see it, the norm like what maybe you are referring to is primitive to me.

Its funny though. I've been posting for over 10 years on these boards. I've been dealing with this exact same thing over and over on every board I post. The stuff I posted 10 years ago is basically the same stuff I post now with slight variations, tweaks. What I dont think anyone realizes is my stuff is copied and posted everywhere by others so I find it hard to believe NEPS has a clue. Whats odd is, the emails and PM's I get are the opposite reaction to what I get on these boards.

I get the exact same crap from guys at the PS too until I end up working with them on their job. Then their reaction is "dude, I thought you were full of ****". None of them take me serious at first and the reason is what I do is insane in comparison to their best day, seriously insane. I do in 70-80 hrs what their crew of 7 does in 346+ hours. Hey NEPS, if you are not interested on how thats possible then keep your mouth shut because others want to know. You have to inject your crap on all the good threads and clutter them up.

Where do you think the whole "HOME SERVICES" came from? You see that everywhere now, Home Depot, Maids, etc. Guys straight up rip my old websites and make it their own. Hell they even copy the company name too.

Anyway, I dont do anything traditional in this business, you cant possibly comprehend my frustration with the tools I had to use developing my systems. This is why when the Wooster Alpha came out, I said, "Finally, a brush that's made for power users" and "The Alpha truly makes me feel as if I own a quality professional tool of the trade".<The first. Why would I follow in the footsteps of constant failure, I'm not oblivious to what others do, its my business to know.. and I'm not oblivious to the impact I've made over the years on these forums. Might sound a little or a lot pat-on-the-back, but thats the honest truth of it. NEPS doesnt mean a damn thing to me, he's just another loud mouth, I deal with his kind all to often. NEPS is the epitome of the sterotypical painter. Join him.
 

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There are 4 more reasons to sand after caulk, one quality related, one durability related and two more for efficiency reasons that affect the other steps Mantis outlined. NEPS will explain them so everybody understands and then maybe NEPS can explain how taking extra steps to assure quality results are referred to as hacks.

NEPS buddy, I bet you can’t come up with one reason why sanding after caulk is a bad idea and I would sure like to hear why you refer to it as a hack.
 

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For a high quality finish, it is ESSENTIAL to sand the primer coat well. If you apply finish to unsanded primer, it will never be as good. I fill nail holes before primer as well, since sanding can burn through primer.

I fill, sand, prime, sand, caulk, finish, sand, finish.
How so? With what primer? Did you know some primers provide more bite if you dont sand them?

If you have something smooth like pre-primed trim and shoot a smooth coat of primer over it, why d=is it ESSENTIAL to sand the double smooth surface exactly?
 

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I would not sand uncoated caulk because dust tends to stick to caulk. It can also adversely affect the texture of the caulk. Once the first coat of finish is applied to the caulk, then any imperfections can be sanded out. Caulk does apply better between coats of finish, but then there are no second chances to look over caulk as carefully as it can be done after a coat of finish is on top.
 

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Since he is not listed as an expert jane, here are the pearls of wisdom. All you painters in the house, raise your hand in the air if you can think of a latex primer that is capable of exceeding Mr. Pauhl's 10 criteria:

Is primer for you?
Jack Pauhl writes:
Mon, 01/19/2009 - 11:30am
The best primer for bare drywall depends on what expectations you have from the paint you will apply over it. You have a few options, the short answer is – primer is not the best option for new drywall, a drywall sealer such as Zinsser Gardz is. However, keep in mind like any product, there are many differences in quality and features. It’s best to decide what you expect out of the paint you will be putting over the bare drywall. Some people paint to simply freshen up a room with no other expectations such as 1) hanging wallpaper at a later date or 2) having the option to wipe, 3) wash, 4) scrub the walls or 5) in kids rooms being able to remove crayon and permanent marker, 6) ability to repeatedly remove taped-up posters and pictures and 7) to apply and remove masking tape for a wild color scheme of stripes and stars, 8) applying finish paint such as eggshell or semi-gloss, 9) high traffic areas and 10) in rooms or areas with large amounts of window glare. Whatever your expectations are for finish paints - washability and scrubabilty features and the items listed above are dependant on the basecoat beneath the top coat. It’s important to understand the different capabilities of wall primers. You may want to google me and read up on bare drywall for a more in depth look at the limitations of wall primer.

Was that too technical for you? Those DIY people seem to understand it clearly. There is no latex primer that will do all that. Come on. These posts are a waste of time and space. This guy had a decent thread going on here.
 

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How so? With what primer? Did you know some primers provide more bite if you dont sand them?

If you have something smooth like pre-primed trim and shoot a smooth coat of primer over it, why d=is it ESSENTIAL to sand the double smooth surface exactly?
1. Perfection in a spray job does not exist, so every coat benefits from sanding to smooth as much as possible. It removes any texture so each successive coat goes on more smoothly.

2. Primed MDF is NOT a perfect, smooth substrate. Check out the edge of door trim and the top of base. Check out the MDF doors. Sand please even before priming:thumbsup:.
 

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Maybe I mis-read something or I am too slow for your mind that must think like 7 men. You ARE suggesting that you do not sand the trim after priming. You prime, fill nails (no sanding), shoot 1st coat trim (still no sanding), caulk trim and then finally SAND??? I'm not sure what pre-primed product you are using that does not need a full sand before any finish coats or the magnitude of the quality of your work. There are blow and go guys all over that think they can get it done faster because they have no clue how to price a job.

Do you like having dust stuck in your caulking? Or sand the caulking? Or sand wood filler under two coats of paint? Why would you ever sand a semi gloss finish that has been prepped for spraying? I don't think you understand how to prep a house for spraying. Maybe your focus should be on the quality of your surface prep and not the speed.

Your selling a gimmick. Your videos are shot from a distance with watered down paint and you do not even come close to the object being cut. You talk a big game of how great you are and could possibly be the fastest painter in the world, but somehow I doubt you would be allowed to finish one job I have started in the last 15 years.

Speed and poor quality does not make a painting professional. I've read you on other boards. You should stick to DIY product reviews and leave contract painting advice to professionals.
 

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If you have something smooth like pre-primed trim and shoot a smooth coat of primer over it, why d=is it ESSENTIAL to sand the double smooth surface exactly?
Here in the UK we have a 3 paint system for wood. We have a primer - That is the first coat. "Prime" means what it infers, a "first" coat. Then we use undercoat. This is a flat finish, usually the same or similar color to your top coat. We normally give 2 coats of this on wood that is to be finished white or light. Then there's the top/finish coat. You always give a good sand after the prime as the wood tends to furr up. This is one of the reasons that you should fill after prime because you aren't scoring the new timber and 'tearing' the grain as you would if you filled and sanded before prime. It also hardens the wood so that you get a much better sanding finish and ends up a lot smoother. You should always give a light scuff between coats - This is to take any specks of dust or crap that you might pick up in your paint during application. On pre-primed MDF then you can obviously fill first but it still needs a sand. Same goes for varnishing/staining - One coat, fill/putty and sand between coats but not before Bare timber sanding is bad practice!

There you go Jack. Now you can go make a video and show us how that's a heap of shyte because you can get the job done faster and better because tearing the timber gives the primer a better key - Oh yeah, and how caulk sands down nicely without tearing and messing up too!
 

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Was that too technical for you?

No Jack. You are not very technical. As I said above, you take very mundane concepts, amplify them and I must give you credit for being a master of self promotion, that you are. On the paint side, not so much.

Those DIY people seem to understand it clearly. T

Do you actually listen to what you say? And why havent they made you an expert Jane?

There is no latex primer that will do all that. Come on.

Here on planet Earth, there actually are, Jack.
 

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What I don't see, after 10 years of your 'educating the painter trade on the Internet', is anybody saying "WOW this Jack has improved my business 7 fold". Nothing like it anywhere that google has found.

It's like a new fangled painting tool - If it's any good then it's used in the trade. You are the human version of an accubrush.
 
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