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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I am a drywall contractor working on my own house. I painted part of my kitchen ceiling (new drywall) about a year ago and now, I just painted the rest of it with the same color. I have the old empty can and the new can of paint and the drips down the sides of both cans look exactly the same. However, where I just painted on the ceiling, it is darker than the part I painted a while back. What should I do? Just wait? Having to paint the whole ceiling again would be a boat load of work.
Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I just held the new paint can up to the newly painted part of the ceiling to see how the paint drips on the side of the can look compared to the ceiling paint and the ceiling looks darker still! How could the paint that got on the side of the can look the same as the older part of the ceiling but, even though its the exact(new) can I used, the pant on the ceiling looks darker? WEIRD!
 

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Hello Slayer, we don't answer questions from drywall guys.
I just held the new paint can up to the newly painted part of the ceiling to see how the paint drips on the side of the can look compared to the ceiling paint and the ceiling looks darker still! How could the paint that got on the side of the can look the same as the older part of the ceiling but, even though its the exact(new) can I used, the pant on the ceiling looks darker? WEIRD!
 

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That's the dirty secret the paint industry doesn't want you to know.

Touch up is essentially impossible/a fool's errand past a certain point, or gives results only suitable for... bad quality housing or temporary fixes before a real paint job can be done. On brand new walls obviously touchup in a couple days or weeks is possible to a degree but sometimes there's sheen issues, sometimes not. Usually not, but it depends on how well the wall is sealed, the paint you use, applicator, temperature, etc, etc.

After a lot of years, your only hope is using the old can of paint used on that wall, but even then sometimes that's futile as paint tends to fade even indoors from UV exposure, and ceiling paints especially due to being cheaper resins/etc (since you're not usually touching them) probably would fade more than say, Benjamin Moore Regal. In your case it's not really even a touchup (as in, 1-2") but multiple feet, so there's way higher likelihood of looking different, and also probably sheen changes/etc from new drywall vs old ceiling paint, etc.

Once you start getting to different gallons of paint, even purchased at the same time, you don't know the batch numbers, if something's been reformulated, etc. Once you use the same brand/etc years later, it could be reformulated differently.
 

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Hello,
I am a drywall contractor working on my own house. I painted part of my kitchen ceiling (new drywall) about a year ago and now, I just painted the rest of it with the same color. I have the old empty can and the new can of paint and the drips down the sides of both cans look exactly the same. However, where I just painted on the ceiling, it is darker than the part I painted a while back. What should I do? Just wait? Having to paint the whole ceiling again would be a boat load of work.
Thanks.
a boat load of work? wtf. lol! get bent bud
 

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Its paint. Its acts weird, different temperatures and humidity can make the paint dry a touch lighter or darker. Also, how heavy the paint is applied can affect it. The paint brand itself is a huge factor too. Im gonna take a wild guess here: Sherwin Williams Promar, or Behr ceiling paint right? Those are notorious for not touching up. Consider it a lesson learned to always paint the whole ceiling.

BTW this happens even using the same bucket of paint. SW can be two different colors where you brush and where you roll from the SAME BUCKET...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I painted the whole ceiling. Looks ok now even though its a bit darker. That brought me to another question. I used the blue masking tape and it reaaly stuck to the crown molding. Actually pulled some of the white paint off the crown and it didn't come off clean. when I pulled it off, it took some of the new paint I put on the ceiling with it and left a lot of touch up. As a T&T guy, I've masked a lot but I've always used the older beige colored masking tape. Should I keep using it instead of the blue stuff?
Thanks you, guys.
 

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I painted the whole ceiling. Looks ok now even though its a bit darker. That brought me to another question. I used the blue masking tape and it reaaly stuck to the crown molding. Actually pulled some of the white paint off the crown and it didn't come off clean. when I pulled it off, it took some of the new paint I put on the ceiling with it and left a lot of touch up. As a T&T guy, I've masked a lot but I've always used the older beige colored masking tape. Should I keep using it instead of the blue stuff?
Thanks you, guys.
Generally the best masking tape is the green Frog tape for clean lines and days to pull off. Blue tape is I guess midgrade now, and beige is the worst. In truth Frog is the only stuff I've used that is markedly better by a significant margin. Otherwise it seems to be basically down to how fresh the tape is, fresh beige tape will outperform old blue tape left in a vehicle for a whole summer. Generally the beige tapes are rated only for 2-3 days, or 24 hours to pull off paint, I think Frog tape is one week or 10 days, and the blue tapes are 3-5. If you leave any masking tape up for 2-3 weeks it will probably pull paint off with it. If you're unsure about paint pulling off, it's better sometimes to razor the "line" you want vs just pulling the tape, and it's better to pull slowly.

Ideally no paint would pull off either your freshly painted work, or old painted work, but it depends on how well the paint got to cure and if there were any surface contaminants under the paint coating (ie, recoating over dirty surfaces, not priming over oil based paint) or other factors like using a cheap paint, not following recoat times, too much humidity in the room for the paint to cure quickly, etc, all would make the paint bond worse and make tape peel it off.

As a pro painter there's always a time and a place for masking tape, but generally if you can avoid it you should and cut in with a brush. On ceilings on the crown you'd probably want to put plastic on the crown to catch spatter, but even on ceilings spatter can be minimized with a good microfiber roller cover. Of course cutting in with a brush takes skill and hours to develop, vs Frog Tape which doesn't.
 

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Generally the best masking tape is the green Frog tape for clean lines and days to pull off. Blue tape is I guess midgrade now, and beige is the worst. In truth Frog is the only stuff I've used that is markedly better by a significant margin. Otherwise it seems to be basically down to how fresh the tape is, fresh beige tape will outperform old blue tape left in a vehicle for a whole summer. Generally the beige tapes are rated only for 2-3 days, or 24 hours to pull off paint, I think Frog tape is one week or 10 days, and the blue tapes are 3-5. If you leave any masking tape up for 2-3 weeks it will probably pull paint off with it. If you're unsure about paint pulling off, it's better sometimes to razor the "line" you want vs just pulling the tape, and it's better to pull slowly.

Ideally no paint would pull off either your freshly painted work, or old painted work, but it depends on how well the paint got to cure and if there were any surface contaminants under the paint coating (ie, recoating over dirty surfaces, not priming over oil based paint) or other factors like using a cheap paint, not following recoat times, too much humidity in the room for the paint to cure quickly, etc, all would make the paint bond worse and make tape peel it off.

As a pro painter there's always a time and a place for masking tape, but generally if you can avoid it you should and cut in with a brush. On ceilings on the crown you'd probably want to put plastic on the crown to catch spatter, but even on ceilings spatter can be minimized with a good microfiber roller cover. Of course cutting in with a brush takes skill and hours to develop, vs Frog Tape which doesn't.
Great answer. Very comprehensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So, does the tape get stickier as it ages? Come to think of it, I have found old rolls in my tool buckets that I could only rip little unusable peices off the roll because it was so stuck together. These rolls are probably a year old and have not been in thier original package wapping, Just sitting out in the air. The one I used on the crown moulding did seem rather hard to pull through the hand masker and boy did it stick to the trim! Peeled some of the trim paint off, even!
 

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So, does the tape get stickier as it ages? Come to think of it, I have found old rolls in my tool buckets that I could only rip little unusable peices off the roll because it was so stuck together. These rolls are probably a year old and have not been in thier original package wapping, Just sitting out in the air. The one I used on the crown moulding did seem rather hard to pull through the hand masker and boy did it stick to the trim! Peeled some of the trim paint off, even!
Yep, it does. Another advantage of Frog Tape is it's in a plastic box that you seal back up again, so less potential of UV light or air hitting it.

It's expensive tape, though. :(

Another thing you can buy is "low tack" masking tape. https://www.amazon.com/FrogTape-Delicate-Surface-Painting-280222/dp/B004QAO9V6 Frog's version is yellow. I think basically all the companies make low tack or "Delicate Surface" masking tape, including 3M. Just again, the caveat there is it should be freshest, as that would matter most. If you need to store it for long periods of time, it's best to leave it unopened and in a cabinet in a cool dry place, not in a hot vehicle or similar.
 
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