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So my question is, we had just painted our hallways in my building and i have a lot of extra paint left over, my question is: How long can i use the extra paint to patch the wall until it starts to look different in shading? reason i ask is because the reason for the painting project is, when i went to go do a patch job; the paint didn't match anymore, it had been a couple months since it was brand new.
 

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Generally speaking, the term "touch-up" means going back and hitting spots that were missed during a paint job. Usually within a couple of weeks at most. Any longer than that, although it's quite common for people to try, and I consider it to be a crap shoot. Especially if the paint has any kind of sheen to it. The whole "touch up" thing has been taken way out of context.

That being said, it can sometimes be done if you are using paint from the exact same can you painted with in the first place. Going back to the Depot and buying another gallon a couple years later ain't going to do it. No matter how hard you try.
 
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What they said

and... Some paints touch up better then others. Few things that help to touch up are. Using the same type roller(size matters). Which side you face your handle (keep it the same). Easier to touch up on walls that have true coats and not skimpy walls with uneven finish or not true sheen.

Other posters are right but using a few methods you can get "touch ups" to look better then most who try to do it.

Good luck.
 

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What's the correct way to store paint for 12 years?
Some place warm and dry all year. This person kept it in their closet and like I said they used it every so often so it didn't settle and turn into sludge.

One job we did last year I asked the HO to store paint and stains inside, he didn't and needs touch ups. Cottage cheese is what he has now.
 

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CD is spot on. Don't store them where lots of moisture may be present like a basement. The lid areas tend to rust and also the bottoms of the can get rust holes sometimes. Of course that's for metal cans. I've stored some paint for as long as 20 years and have USED it after much straining and reconditioning. I don't recommend it, but, in a pinch, it still does the job.
 

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If the paint was only a couple months old, should be fine. Maybe you will get flashing from an eggshell or satin though.

I have stirred paint that froze and got thick, splashed some water in it and as long as it was a matte finish, still dried seemless.
 

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I have stirred paint that froze and got thick, splashed some water in it and as long as it was a matte finish, still dried seemless.
I had a BM rep tell me once that Regal can 'potentially' go through several freeze thaw cycles and still be fine if you get it reshaken (this was proven in their labs), but they never ever want this information to be well known to the public. Can't say I've ever experimented with this myself.
 

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I think it also depends how much paint is left in the can. I have stirred decades old sears weather beater, that was basically a mass of paint that looked like a volcanoe, added a splash of water and stirred into paintable paint again. Yet if its 10 percent paint left in a gallon can of air, it dries solid.
Interesting comment from the paint rep good to know.
Some of the jobs, ya get people asking ya to do touch ups, last minute when your wrappin up new work and so in those cases, if their paint froze in the garage, im gonna try and do the touch up, rather than come back a separate day w new paint.
 
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