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Hello Everyone,

I have a lot of experience with interior and exterior painting, but have always avoided cabinets. I am now moving into a new construction home but I was too late to choose my cabinet color (they gave me dark brown). The cabinets are beech and stained in a dark brown. The wife wants gray, so gray it is.

I'm a KM guy, and will will specifically be using Gallery Gray, likely in a semi-gloss. Boy, do I have a ton of questions for you all.

ITEM 1: I have always used an airless Graco X7, but am planning on investing in an HVLP due to the seemingly better results one can achieve. (True?) I need these cabinets to have a factory finish or I will never hear the end of it. Because I will only need this sprayer for the cabinets, it doesn't need to be commercial-grade. The Capsprays are awesome, but out of my budget. I am thinking about getting a Fuji Semi-PRO 2 (tried to insert the URL here, but apparently I need to have posted 20 times to do that) and utilizing the gravity fed hopper. Does anyone have experience with a sprayer like this?

ITEM 2: What type of paint do you all recommend to shoot through an HVLP (assuming you recommend HVLP)? I like the idea of the KM (1930) Pro oil-water hybrid due to the hard shell finish and low odor, but realize I will probably have to thin this down with only a 2 stage sprayer.

ITEM 3: Of course, I may be off-base entirely, so I would love to get all of your opinions on what sprayer/paint type combo to use along with what prep, sanding, and finish (polishing compound, etc.)

I really appreciate it, everyone! Pictures will surely come once the project gets underway.

Best,

Patrick
 

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I am not familiar with the X7 so can’t speak to that (others will), but I would NOT recommend an HVLP if you are wanting to spray acrylic enamels such as KM’s Dura-Poxi. They are generally too heavy a product to be pushed through an HVLP and thinning them reduces their integrity too much, at least IMO.

I use a Graco 395 with a Graco FFLP 310 tip and get great results. I just use a bit of XIM latex leveler in it.
 

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hi

HVLP & PPG Breaktrough with 10% water as tinner works perfect with Titan 115. If you cant afford good HVLP better consider FFLP 310.
 

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I've rarely heard anyone recommend an HVLP for spraying Waterborne finishes. Most don't have enough power and the turbine produces hot air, which can cause issues. I've achieved excellent results with my airless, but an air assist airless would be another alternative.

A few of the biggest challenge of achieving a "factory" comes to down to your prep work and your spray booth. Overspray and dust/dirt floating in your spray booth can easily ruin your finish.


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I have two X17's that I rent out for small jobs. I wish I had never bought them. They spray OK but the Pumps and guns that come with them are basically unservicable. You can't run any solvent through them or risk destroying the packings. Never even bothered with them to spray doors/cabinets. Much happier with my 390's.
 

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I have to concur that a better finish can be obtained with an airless. There are just too many variables with HVLP, and even if you get one dialed in as good as you can on pressure, viscosity, air mix, fan width, etc., it’s just not going to atomize as well as a FF tip in an airless.

HVLP does give you more control, and makes spraying boxes easier. For doors though, it’s hard to beat an airless finish.

We use a lot of Breakthrough for cabinets, and it’s great in many ways.


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You need to prime them with BIN first. Supposedly, breakthrough will stick to anything though... Durapoxy sticks to oil, but I wouldnt trust it over stain and lacquer.
 

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Simple is always better tough.
For stained any color lacquer top coated cabinets :

clean the substrate with a dawn water mixture and dry with a towel.easy and cheap way to clean from oil and surface dirt.fine sand with 220 lightly.
Get your Lacquer undercoater pigmented to the color of your choice.
first coat is your repair coat.you will see the surface defects and what you have to repair.
second coat is your final color coat.get a good clean look after sprayed.
the third and fourth is your topcoat.Any sheen you like is ok. this is lacquer and i love hand rubbed or dull rubbed satin on them.

make sure you use HVLP and 1.3 needle. do not spray more than 4 mil each coat.get your self a mil gauge if you are not sure.it is cheap and always good to have.
good luck and do not try to spray water base acrylic paints like breakthrough or else with your hvlp. hvlp sprayers are meant to use with fine finishes not thick body paints.Use your x7 for them and finish wall and else not cabinets.

Good luck .
 

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I’ve seen tons of painted cabinets with waterborne finishes done many myself. The end result is how well will the finish hold up to repeated use , washing, opening ,closing etc.

I’m not sold on many I can say that. Sure they look great when sprayed , the product sprays easily, flattens out , looks killer. But how well how duarable it will be remains to be seen.
Still nothing like a oil or lacquer finish.
 

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Technogod:. Thanks for your tips! Are you referring to pigmented lacquers? Could you tell us specifically what products you are using?
 

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Almost all our cabinet jobs are oak. They are usually grease and nicotine stained.
Washing with dawn dish soap will do nothing.
Before any grain filling or priming we wipe down with will bond or in some cases KK.
We always shellac first always.
Then we fill grain ( which can take multiple coats depending on the desired finish.
Prime again or topcoat depending on product . Lacquer is a great choice but not always ready available in my area especially in deep colors.
I’ve sprayed all kinds of waterborne products with HVLP with no issues . It’s all in the additives and thinning. I’d rather use my airless or lacquer but it can be done. Just my 2 CT’s.

Listening to The might Led Zeppelin ( That’s the Way from LD111 🙌🏻🙌🏻🙌🏻🙌🏻
 

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Simple is always better tough.

For stained any color lacquer top coated cabinets :



clean the substrate with a dawn water mixture and dry with a towel.easy and cheap way to clean from oil and surface dirt.fine sand with 220 lightly.

Get your Lacquer undercoater pigmented to the color of your choice.

first coat is your repair coat.you will see the surface defects and what you have to repair.

second coat is your final color coat.get a good clean look after sprayed.

the third and fourth is your topcoat.Any sheen you like is ok. this is lacquer and i love hand rubbed or dull rubbed satin on them.



make sure you use HVLP and 1.3 needle. do not spray more than 4 mil each coat.get your self a mil gauge if you are not sure.it is cheap and always good to have.

good luck and do not try to spray water base acrylic paints like breakthrough or else with your hvlp. hvlp sprayers are meant to use with fine finishes not thick body paints.Use your x7 for them and finish wall and else not cabinets.



Good luck .


I’ve been considering switching to lacquer myself. Supply is a problem here. The only lacquer I have easy access to is Sherwin’s pre cat, which I do like. But I can only get it in white and off white.

Do you have a supplier that offers a full range of colored lacquer?

You mention the mil restrictions. That’s another thing that worries me. Recently painted a set that had been done in white lacquer years ago. It had cracked all the way through in several places. I assume from having too thick of a film applied. And of course they had yellowed.

Nothing looks like lacquer but lacquer, and it’s the best finish IMO. It has some drawbacks though.


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Technogod:. Thanks for your tips! Are you referring to pigmented lacquers? Could you tell us specifically what products you are using?
I live in California and because of the voc regulations finding a good paint for cabinets always a headache.

i hate to wave company flags blindly.i don't care how fancy names they have or not. i put them to test before i use for my customer for sure.
all i care is how quality products they have for my purpose.
also if i find a good product i don't care the 10 dollar's difference this and that one either.At the end of the day it is your name on the line.

pigmented lacquer or colorant added undercoater.i prefer colorant added undercoater follow by clear coat.this one i found easy work and sanding purposes.

i use Gemini,Mohawk,Sherwin Williams,Deft. these are the company's close to my area and they have the products i need.
 

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There's definitely a lot of pros and cons to any system. I can't imagine spraying lacquer in an occupied house on the frames. I've seen plenty yellow, chip, crack, and touch up is impossible.

Oil chips and yellows over time making touch up difficult. Plus, it's also stinky although not half as bad as lacquer.

Breakthrough is my product of choice. It doesn't smell all that bad, is about a tough as you can get for a waterborne, and touching up if anything does happen is a breeze.

If I had a cabinet shop with a proper spray booth and were doing them from new I'd be using lacquer. I just don't think it's worth jumping through all the hoops and dealing with the stink on a repaint.

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I’ve been considering switching to lacquer myself. Supply is a problem here. The only lacquer I have easy access to is Sherwin’s pre cat, which I do like. But I can only get it in white and off white.

Do you have a supplier that offers a full range of colored lacquer?

You mention the mil restrictions. That’s another thing that worries me. Recently painted a set that had been done in white lacquer years ago. It had cracked all the way through in several places. I assume from having too thick of a film applied. And of course they had yellowed.

Nothing looks like lacquer but lacquer, and it’s the best finish IMO. It has some drawbacks though.


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Yeap.thats the reason for cracking.Mil tickness.keep close to 4 mil.mil gauge helps lots to get use to your gun adjustment and spraying technique.i use hvlp never a airless for fine finishes.easy to adjust tough.
yellowing is something i really cannot speak but in my case i did not see any with this formulas up to now.

Sherwin williams i use are these cans.they have different formulas for different regions and it is confusing .but these cans never let me down.
the one on the very right is multi surface acrylic. it is the one you may spray with your airless.man i really love and love this formula.sprays easy,dries fast and very hard.sand like lacquer after 1 hour.i really have no idea what you need and want from a acrylic paint more than this. use for cabinet or trim or wall or metal or anything :))
i am not making advertisement. trying is believing.

 

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There's definitely a lot of pros and cons to any system. I can't imagine spraying lacquer in an occupied house on the frames. I've seen plenty yellow, chip, crack, and touch up is impossible.

Oil chips and yellows over time making touch up difficult. Plus, it's also stinky although not half as bad as lacquer.

Breakthrough is my product of choice. It doesn't smell all that bad, is about a tough as you can get for a waterborne, and touching up if anything does happen is a breeze.

If I had a cabinet shop with a proper spray booth and were doing them from new I'd be using lacquer. I just don't think it's worth jumping through all the hoops and dealing with the stink on a repaint.

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you are absolutely right.That is because cabinet finishing is another level of painting.needs lots of preparation and equipment.
you basically cannot put wall and house finishing with cabinetry finishing into same basket.


Breakthrough is a total bust in my area .50 voc formula.
but the other 250 is a real deal and impossible to find here in California.
i never want to spray that to a cabinetry tough.

New formula pre-cat lacquers are the industry standard for fast production paint for cabinetry.
it is not the best choice in some cases but the fast and easy way tough.
 

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you are absolutely right.That is because cabinet finishing is another level of painting.needs lots of preparation and equipment.
you basically cannot put wall and house finishing with cabinetry finishing into same basket.


Breakthrough is a total bust in my area .50 voc formula.
but the other 250 is a real deal and impossible to find here in California.
i never want to spray that to a cabinetry tough.

New formula pre-cat lacquers are the industry standard for fast production paint for cabinetry.
it is not the best choice in some cases but the fast and easy way tough.
Yeah I get the good stuff here which I use for the doors. I use the v50 for brush and rolling the frames because it's easier to work with and the frames don't take nearly as much abuse as the doors do.

I did my work desk with the good stuff 4 years ago and it looks like the day I did it. No cabinet doors are subjected to as much abuse as this desk gets.


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Yeap.thats the reason for cracking.Mil tickness.keep close to 4 mil.mil gauge helps lots to get use to your gun adjustment and spraying technique.i use hvlp never a airless for fine finishes.easy to adjust tough.
yellowing is something i really cannot speak but in my case i did not see any with this formulas up to now.

Sherwin williams i use are these cans.they have different formulas for different regions and it is confusing .but these cans never let me down.
the one on the very right is multi surface acrylic. it is the one you may spray with your airless.man i really love and love this formula.sprays easy,dries fast and very hard.sand like lacquer after 1 hour.i really have no idea what you need and want from a acrylic paint more than this. use for cabinet or trim or wall or metal or anything :))
i am not making advertisement. trying is believing.

I did a couple cabinet jobs with Multi surface and I won't be doing anymore. Areas that get handled frequently get sticky almost gummy for a lack of a better word. From what I was told it was SWs attempt to reverse engineer Breakthrough. It's close but doesn't have the long term durability of breakthrough.

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ITEM 1: I have always used an airless Graco X7, but am planning on investing in an HVLP due to the seemingly better results one can achieve. (True?) I need these cabinets to have a factory finish or I will never hear the end of it. Because I will only need this sprayer for the cabinets, it doesn't need to be commercial-grade. The Capsprays are awesome, but out of my budget. I am thinking about getting a Fuji Semi-PRO 2 (tried to insert the URL here, but apparently I need to have posted 20 times to do that) and utilizing the gravity fed hopper. Does anyone have experience with a sprayer like this?

-Depending on what product you choose will determine what sprayer. Enamels both oil and latex will have good success through an airless unit and the correct tip. I have been told to stay away from budget priced turbine sprayers. You will have better results buying an 10+ gal air compressor and a decent HVLP. Check out the cabinets I just posted, they were sprayed with the Harbor Freight Purple gun and a 10 gal compressor (I used water-borne lacquer, clear satin)

ITEM 2: What type of paint do you all recommend to shoot through an HVLP (assuming you recommend HVLP)? I like the idea of the KM (1930) Pro oil-water hybrid due to the hard shell finish and low odor, but realize I will probably have to thin this down with only a 2 stage sprayer.

-Like stated above, any oil or latex enamels are better sprayed through an airless. I am saying this from experience. I used SW Proclassic oil enamel last year and had nothing but problems through an hvlp so switched to my airless and had great results. Durapoxy is just as thick, I always use an airless with fantastic results. If you want to use an HVLP set-up and want to spray the cabinets gray your options are slim. Any white or clear lacquers work wonders through hvlp.

ITEM 3: Of course, I may be off-base entirely, so I would love to get all of your opinions on what sprayer/paint type combo to use along with what prep, sanding, and finish (polishing compound, etc.)

-If you want gray cabinets your options for material should stay around enamels. Which you will want to put through an airless sprayer. If they were my cabinets I would strip them down to wood, carefully because most cabinet centers are veneer (chemical strippers help). Two coats of SW Easy sand Primer, only need to sand before top coats. Spray two coats of Proclassic Alkyd (oil-base), make sure to let dry for 24 hours between coats. A light sanding before the final coat with 220 would do you good.

*Check out the photos of projects section in the forum, I have a few cabinet threads that may be worth checking out
 
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